SEngine Precision Medicine to Present at Society of Functional Precision Medicine Virtual …

Press release content from Globe Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

SEATTLE, Oct. 13, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — SEnginePrecision Medicine, a precision oncology company revolutionizing cancer diagnostics and drug discovery by pre-testing drugs on patient-derived tumor organoids, today announced that Chief Medical Officer Astrid L. Margossian, MD, PhD, will present at the Society for Functional Precision Medicine (SFPM) Virtual Monthly Seminar on October 14th at 11:30 am ET.

Dr. Margossian is leading SEngine’s clinical validation initiatives for the PARIS® Test, a CLIA certified cancer organoid based drug sensitivity test for all solid tumors. The presentation is entitled, “Predictive Clinical Value of a CLIA-Approved Organoid Based Drug Sensitivity Test,” and will highlight the data on the PARIS® Test, recently presented at the ASCO 2020 and ACCR 2020 annual meetings, inclusive of organoids sensitivity results, showing clinical correlation with genomics and previous clinical treatments. Registration for the live event is available for free at https://www.sfpm.io/seminars.php.

SFPM’s virtual monthly seminar brings together distinguished guest speakers and through interactive panel discussions and Q&A sessions focuses on these key topics:

  • Demonstrating the clinical utility of functional precision medicine testing
  • Implementing functional testing in precision medicine clinical trials
  • Accelerating the application of functional testing
  • Addressing stakeholder, educational and investment challenges for functional precision medicine

About PARIS® Test
The CLIA certified PARIS® Test is based on the capability to propagate patient-specific cancer tissue as organoids ex vivo and is applicable to all solid tumors including colon, breast, lung, ovarian and pancreatic cancer. Organoids are cancer-derived cells grown in 3D outside the body, which maintain the functionality of the original tumor as well as its genomic characteristics. For cancers where the path is not clear, such as many metastatic and recurrent cancers, the PARIS test provides crucial information to the treating physicians to match the right drug to the right patient.

About SEngine Precision Medicine
SEngine Precision Medicine Inc. is a precision oncology company revolutionizing cancer diagnostics and therapies by pre-testing drugs on patient-derived organoids grown ex-vivo utilizing patient specific tumor cells. As a spin-out from the world-renowned Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, SEngine is leveraging over two decades of R&D in diagnostics and drug discovery. The Company is commercializing the PARIS® Test, a next generation diagnostic test that predicts drug responses integrating knowledge of cancer genomics with organoids, robotics, and AI-driven computational tools. SEngine’s CLIA certified PARIS® Test generates predictive drug sensitivity reports for patients with solid tumors. SEngine is also pursuing drug discovery via strategic collaborations with biopharmaceutical / pharma companies leveraging its precision oncology platform.

Discover more at SengineMedicine.com and follow the latest news from SEngine on Twitter at @SEngineMedicine and on LinkedIn.

Contact:
Stephanie Carrington
[email protected]
646-277-1282

Source Article

Vituity and Decoded Health Launch Virtual Front Door for Hospitals and Health Systems

Vituity, a nationwide, physician-owned-and-led multispecialty partnership, and Decoded Health, a startup focused on building the world’s first clinical hyper-automation platform, today announced the launch of the world’s first clinically trained, artificially intelligent virtual front door solution for hospitals and clinics. Serving as the digital entry point to the healthcare system, Vituity’s Intelligent Virtual Front Door Solution will utilize Decoded Health’s Hyperautomation Platform to scale the entire clinical workflow, from inferring patients’ needs to rationalizing a plan of care.

Through a deep learning network, the platform provides providers with the ability to multiply their capacity and focus on what matters most – treating patients – and patients with the right care from anywhere in the world. The platform goes beyond traditional telehealth platforms by utilizing conversational AI to interview the patient, recommend a care plan to the physician, gain physician approval, and provide the patient with the necessary treatment while integrating simultaneously with common electronic health records.

“We recognized that Decoded Health has deep technical expertise and is laser-focused on creating the best solution for patients and clinicians,” says Rick Newell, MD, Chief Transformation Officer at Vituity. “They have leveraged our four decades of industry-leading insights, our experience of providing care to millions of patients each year across the country, and our collaborative relationships with health systems and payers, and turned them into a solution that creates more efficiencies and also drives revenue. We are excited to launch this latest care innovation to hospitals and health systems nationwide.”

“Healthcare technologies frequently die on the vine because it is difficult to understand the problem across a diverse set of stakeholders, navigate the complexity of the healthcare environment, and then deploy through robust national relationships,” said Mark Hanson, CEO of Decoded Health. “An early critical insight for our team was that healthcare startups need a clinical partner to break through customer discovery and validation. This partnership allowed our team to benefit from the expertise of thousands of Vituity providers with experience and relationships across hundreds of healthcare systems to quickly develop a unique offering and accelerate growth.”

About Vituity

For nearly 50 years, Vituity has been a catalyst for positive change in healthcare. As a physician-led and -owned multispecialty partnership with a nationwide footprint, nearly 5,000 Vituity clinicians working across nine acute care specialties care for more than 6.5 million patients each year.

Vituity’s acute focus and compassionate care are the driving forces that place us at the heart of better care. Our clinicians and practice management leaders develop front-line solutions for healthcare challenges that improve quality and have a direct, positive impact on millions of lives nationwide.

Our services span the entire acute care continuum, integrating emergency medicine, hospital medicine, critical care, anesthesiology, acute psychiatry, neurology, acute care surgery, telehealth, post-acute care, and outpatient medicine. Partnering with hospitals, health systems, clinics, payers, employers, and state and local government, our footprint continues to rapidly expand. Learn more at vituity.com.

About Decoded Health

Decoded Health is developing the world’s first Clinical RPA platform that

Vida Health Chosen as Virtual Chronic Disease Provider for Vitality’s Gateway Flex Marketplace

Vida’s chronic condition management, stress management, weight loss and lifestyle programs will be offered on the first-of-its-kind benefits marketplace

Vida Health has been selected as a preferred virtual health provider for Vitality’s new Gateway Flex. As employers face rising costs of employee benefits and the changes brought on by the pandemic, Gateway Flex offers a new way of boosting health and wellness engagement by offering more relevant choices to employees to meet their specific needs.

Through the first-of-its-kind platform, employers select a list of partners that will be most impactful in meeting their employees’ diverse health needs. Employees are then able to select the services they need and can use employer-allocated funds to purchase services of their choice.

As a preferred partner, Vida Health will offer a number of clinically validated programs for users to choose from. The programs include weight loss, stress management, chronic condition management, tobacco cessation, exercise, nutrition, sleep, resilience, and prediabetes.

“Vida has a proven track-record of achieving industry-leading outcomes for its users,” said Tal Gilbert, CEO, Vitality USA. “We were very selective about which vendors we offered as part of Gateway Flex and the sustained behavior change and lasting outcomes Vida’s virtual solution provides were a perfect fit for our member organizations.”

“We’re proud to be participating in this innovative new program from Vitality,” said Vida Health Founder and CEO Stephanie Tilenius. “The only way to solve America’s health problem is by helping people to live healthier lives — one person at a time. The additional people who now have access to Vida through this partnership help us move closer to our goal of eradicating chronic illness in America.”

About Vida Health

Vida Health is a leading virtual care platform that was designed from the ground up to treat multiple chronic health conditions simultaneously, through a balance of machine learning that personalizes each person’s treatment and a human connection with real life health coaches and therapists who bring the empathy and accountability people need to reach their goals. Vida Health’s services are delivered through a mobile platform that supports individuals in preventing, managing and reversing chronic conditions such as pre-diabetes, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, depression, anxiety, etc. The platform integrates deep individual expert care with data-driven technology and remote monitoring to deliver best-in-class health outcomes and cost savings to employers and health plans. To-date, some of the largest nationwide health plans and employers have benefited from Vida’s unique offering.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201013005296/en/

Contacts

Connor Jones
[email protected]

Source Article

Tyme Technologies to Present at Jefferies Virtual Global Healthcare Conference on November 17-19, 2020

Tyme Technologies, Inc. (NASDAQ: TYME), an emerging biotechnology company developing cancer metabolism-based therapies (CMBTs™), announced that its leadership will present at the Jefferies Virtual Global Healthcare Conference on November 17-19. In one-on-one sessions, the Company will present its corporate overview for fiscal year 2021 with a special focus on multiple growth opportunities driven by advances in the science of cancer cell metabolism, SM-88 (racemetyrosine) late-stage trials in pancreatic cancer, SM-88 HopES trial in ultra-rare metastatic sarcoma, proof-of-concept RESPOnD™ trial evaluating TYME-19 in COVID-19, and expanding clinical plans for its cancer-metabolism pipeline candidate SM-88 in prostate, breast and hematological cancers.

Event: Jefferies Virtual Global Healthcare Conference
Place: Waldorf Hilton, London
Presentation Date: November 17-19, 2020
Format: One-on-one sessions

The presentation will be accessible on the events page under the investor relations section of Tyme Technologies’ website at www.tymeinc.com.

About SM-88

SM-88 is an oral investigational modified proprietary tyrosine derivative that is believed to interrupt the metabolic processes of cancer cells by breaking down the cells’ key defenses and leading to cell death through oxidative stress and exposure to the body’s natural immune system. Clinical trial data have shown that SM-88 has demonstrated encouraging tumor responses across 15 different cancers, including pancreatic, lung, breast, prostate and sarcoma cancers with minimal serious grade 3 or higher adverse events. Learn more.

About TYME-18

TYME-18 is composed of a proprietary surfactant delivery agent with a specific sulfonic acid component. It is designed for intra-tumoral administration of difficult to treat tumors and leverages the acidic tumor microenvironment and signaling pathways to kill cancer cells. TYME-18 is distinct in composition, but like SM-88, aims to leverage susceptibilities of a cancer that are related to its altered metabolism. Initial preclinical data for TYME-18 in animal tumor models demonstrate rapid and complete tumor regression, with no reported local or systemic toxicities. TYME-18 continues to be studied as a potential therapy for difficult to treat tumors that may not be eligible for surgical or other interventions. Learn more.

About TYME-19

TYME-19 is a potent, well characterized synthetic antiviral bile acid that is being evaluated as a potential oral therapy for COVID-19. In preclinical testing, TYME-19 repeatedly prevented COVID-19 viral replication without attributable cytotoxicity in treated cells. COVID-19 hijacks a cell’s ability to make proteins and lipids and divert these processes to make viral proteins and lipids in order to reproduce. COVID-19 accomplishes this by inducing stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where cells process proteins, which enables the virus to remodel protein and lipid synthesis. In preclinical testing, TYME-19 has been shown to counteract these effects, preventing viral replication, by reducing ER stress. TYME-19 is believed to physically degrade viruses by solubilizing the protective lipid layer and other structural components, which prevent a virus from binding to and infecting a cell.

About TYME-88-Panc Pivotal Trial

The TYME-88-Panc pivotal trial applies the latest advances in the field of cancer metabolism by evaluating the efficacy and safety of an oral investigational compound that targets the metabolic mechanisms of the

Why experts say the pandemic-led virtual fitness boom is here to stay

  • Much like how Netflix and Amazon disrupted the way Americans watch television and shop, experts say the on-demand fitness boom is ushering in the next wave of digitization in our lives. 
  • While the pandemic was integral to the rise of digital fitness, Matthew Schopfer, head of research at Infusive, said it ultimately served to accelerate a push towards digital fitness that had long been in the works.
  • “The virtual component was already a big deal for us as a brand,” Retro Fitness Chief Marketing Officer Victor Bao told Business Insider. “And then as the pandemic shut down every single business in the world, we made a big thrust into virtual.”
  • We talked to leaders in the fitness industry and analysts about why they think virtual fitness is here to stay, even when the pandemic subsides. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The pandemic has drastically changed the way Americans exercise, and now experts say it will have lasting effects on the long-term digitization of fitness. 

With gyms and fitness studios temporarily shuttered earlier this year to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, consumers found alternate outlets to break a sweat — namely virtual, on-demand fitness programs.

According to Matthew Schopfer, head of research at investment management firm Infusive, while it is true that the pandemic was integral to this shift, the coronavirus ultimately served to accelerate a push toward digital fitness that had long been in the works. 

Much like how Netflix and Amazon disrupted the way Americans watch television and shop, Schopfer says the on-demand fitness boom is another example of digitization infiltrating all aspects of our lives.  

“We’ve seen this across all sorts of different industries and categories, whether that’s e-commerce or digital entertainment or food delivery, and also of course on-demand fitness,” he told Business Insider. “The rising penetration of digital consumption was already an ongoing global secular trend.” 

Infusive’s early research also indicates that there will be a “permanent consumer behavior change” regarding how Americans exercise over the long term, Schopfer added.

“We’re less of the view that as soon as the economy reopens everything goes back to normal,” he said. “[Virtual fitness] may decelerate from the current growth level, but broadly speaking, we think this shift toward things being more digital at the consumer level is really here to stay.”

Gyms and studios find their virtual footing 

For Retro Fitness — a chain of 150 gym locations across the US — wading into virtual programming during the pandemic ultimately helped to accelerate the company’s pre-pandemic push towards becoming a “lifestyle brand,” according to Chief Marketing Officer Victor Bao. 

“The virtual component was already a big deal for us as a brand,” Bao told Business Insider. “And then as the pandemic shut down every single business in the world, we made a big thrust into virtual.”

He added that this effort included streaming classes taught by Retro instructors, but also mental health and nutritional content. Just last week, the company launched “Retro Fitness Kitchen,” a

Online fitness stars bank on virtual gyms being more than just a phase

Melas’ move into the world of hybrid in-person and digital fitness is an example of a broader trend, which sees Australians now saying will continue virtual workouts having tried them throughout the pandemic.

New research from fitness class scheduling and booking app Mindbody has found that, while most prefer in-person fitness classes over opening their laptops to get the endorphins flowing, over half (51 per cent) anticipate continuing virtual workouts once a week, and 37 per cent expect to keep working out virtually two to three times weekly.

New features

Earlier this year, Mindbody itself added on-demand and livestream features for use by the 5000 Australian gyms, yoga and dance studios, and other fitness operators that use its software.

Its study found that yoga (32 per cent) was the most popular class to do from home, while pilates (28 per cent) and strength training (26 per cent) had been the classes most Australians had returned to in-person during the July period when restrictions eased in most of Australia.

Mindbody’s 2020 New Normal survey was taken by 702 people across Australia about their pre-COVID-19 and current fitness habits. It was conducted between August 11 and August 20, with respondents aged from 18 to 65.

Mindbody Asia-Pacific vice president and managing director Hema Prakash says more Australians will now expect both the studio and virtual fitness experience to be available post-COVID.

“We’re saying to everyone this hybrid model is not a new normal, it’s going to be your absolute normal,” she says.

Mindbody’s customers – gym owners and fitness operators – are on average reporting revenues down around 25 per cent on the previous year due to COVID-19.

Prakash says the businesses faring best were doing so because of extensive customer surveys and having already built up a strong sense of community.

Sydney-based Pilates instructor Bianca Melas has attracted a loyal base of clients to her online platform. 

“If you are a business person that accidentally came into this world of wellness, and you’ve relied on luck, you may not survive this next six months. If you didn’t build the community aspect of your brand and business, it’s going to be super hard to start from scratch again right now,” Ms Prakash said.

In April, around 800 of Mindbody’s then 3000-strong global workforce were laid off or furloughed. The company has since re-hired some as pre-COVID fitness spending levels have rebounded.

In fact, the Mindbody New Normal survey found that the majority of respondents planned to spend the same amount or more on fitness compared to pre-COVID.

In NSW, 87 per cent of respondents felt this way, in Victoria, that figure was 75 per cent, in Queensland, that figure was 89 per cent, and in Western Australian, that figure was 80 per cent.

Melas says her shift to hosting virtual classes had required her to pay attention to details, like virtual room aesthetics and compiling accompanying Spotify music playlists. She says the snappy 30-minute classes have resonated well with clients.

She launched

With athletes trained in resilience, Special Olympics helps members maintain mental and physical fitness through virtual events

Michael Heup, a Special Olympics athlete who has become a leading advocate for people with disabilities, took a deep breath as the torch approached. Heup, who started his Special Olympics career in 2001, has previously competed in soccer, basketball, tennis, snowshoe and other events.

“It’s disappointing that we can’t have large-scale events and gatherings, but we are excited to be back doing what we love,” he said. “Sports!”

His teammate behind him threw his fist in the air.

The small gathering stood in stark contrast to the boisterous crowd of thousands of athletes and law enforcement officials who have rallied around the torch lighting each year.

For 50 years, Special Olympics Maryland has fostered community for thousands of people with disabilities. Weekly trainings and annual tournaments have provided opportunities for connection and purpose, inspiring confidence among people historically subjected to social ostracism.

But when the pandemic took hold in March, Special Olympics Maryland, among other chapters nationwide, was forced to cancel practices, basketball tournaments, kayaking championships and its Summer Games.

A spring and summer void of sporting events could have been catastrophic for the nonprofit and those who rely on it. Instead, it blossomed into a vibrant virtual community buoyed by the signature fortitude of its athletes.

Over the past six months, state chapters of the Special Olympics have launched a series of virtual events that have helped maintain active routines for hundreds of thousands of people with intellectual and physical disabilities. In Maryland, Special Olympics leadership spearheaded weekly online fitness classes. And they launched walk, run and biking challenges, customizing a mobile app to track activity. They have also established online social clubs, including one that throws a virtual dance party every Saturday night.

“What we offer at Special Olympics, it is an essential part of our athletes’ social interaction,” said Jim Schmutz, president and CEO of Special Olympics Maryland. “But what you and I have experienced in the pandemic as it relates to isolation is more close to what our athletes experience historically on a daily basis. So in some cases, our athletes have adapted better than anyone.”

Monique Matthews, a 30-year-old athlete from Baltimore, has been a regular track-and-field competitor with the Special Olympics for eight years. Before the pandemic, she spent many of her days looking forward to Tuesdays and Saturdays, when she would meet with her friends to hone her running skills.

While she noticed people around her mourn the loss of their routines, Matthews simply found new ones online when the public health crisis mandated isolation.

“I just don’t look at it as a pandemic. I look at it as an opportunity to get to know myself better,” she said.

Once shy and afraid to speak her mind, Matthews has taken advantage of the comfortable virtual environment to become a leader among athletes statewide. Over the past six months, she has started leading Zoom sessions about police brutality and teaching online exercise classes that leave fellow athletes sweaty and tired.

“Right now, I feel

Debate commission co-chair defends virtual move after Trump pulls out: ‘We will be guided by the medicine’

Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) co-chair Frank Fahrenkopf has defended the organization’s decision to move the second presidential debate, slated for Oct. 15, to a virtual setting after President Trump dismissed the idea as a “waste” of time. 

“We looked at this thing very, very carefully, and as I have said many times in this particular cycle, we will be guided by the medicine,”  Fahrenkopf said Thursday on “The Story.”

“We will be guided by those people advising us, we are not doctors. And as you know, the Cleveland Clinic has been advising us throughout. They went along with this decision.

The CPD announced early Thursday that “the second presidential debate will take the form of a town meeting, in which the candidates would participate from separate remote locations.” Steve Scully of C-SPAN is still set to moderate from Miami.

TRUMP SAYS HE’S ‘NOT GOING TO WASTE’ HIS TIME ON VIRTUAL DEBATE

Fahrenkopf told host Martha MacCallum there were “just too many questions as to whether or not we could present this with many, many people who would be present in Miami who would be vulnerable.”

The format change was announced six days after the president announced he and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive for the coronavirus. The positive test came a little more than 48 hours after the first debate between Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

The CPD decision was driven “not only [by] his [Trump’s] diagnosis and what happened in Cleveland but what’s happened in the White House in the last week or so [with] so many people having to be tested and quarantined,” Fahrenkopf explained.

TRUMP ADVISER BLASTS DEBATE COMMISSION AS ‘CORRUPT, COMPLICIT SWAP CABAL’

“We have 65 people who work and build these sets and so forth and in a town hall meeting we have people there. We want to make sure that everyone is safe and we will … not take a chance. That’s why we decided if we were going to have this, we had to do it virtually to make sure everyone was safe.”

Trump told Fox Business Netowrk’s Maria Bartiromo earlier Thursday that he will not “waste my time” in a virtual debate, and called the idea of sitting “at a computer” to debate his 2020 challenger “ridiculous.”

Fahrenkopf told MacCallum, however, that the president may have misunderstood the conditions of the updated virtual setting.

“The president said, ‘You don’t want that kind of debate where you’re sitting in front of a computer.’ You’re not,” he explained. “The provisions were they would sit wherever they wanted to – the president could do it from the Oval Office. There would be press people present, also with Biden, people there to make sure he wasn’t reading off a teleprompter.

“I think the president wasn’t properly briefed as to what we’re talking about when we’re talking about a virtual debate,” he said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

When asked whether a new statement from White House physician Dr. Sean

YMCA Of Austin Launches Virtual Fitness Programs

AUSTIN, TX — Just because the coronavirus has halted some activities doesn’t mean you can’t stay fit. With that in mind, the YMCA of Austin is launching an online platform for members offering a fitness experience for them to remain active and healthy, officials said.

Launching this month, the Virtual Y includes access to more than 20 hours of YMCA Live exercise classes each week plus an on-demand library of hundreds of instructional fitness classes. Classes range from yoga, barre and tai chi to cardio fitness and HIIT (High-Impact Interval Training). Classes are suitable for people of all ages and abilities, including a full complement of senior programs such as balance exercises and low-impact workouts for people with reduced mobility.

“On-demand fitness platforms are everywhere these days, but what sets the Virtual Y apart is the local, personal connection we can provide with our instructors, other participants and the community as a whole,” James Finck, YMCA of Austin President & CEO, said in a prepared statement.

The Virtual Y is just the latest in the Y’s long history of innovation, which spans from the invention of basketball and volleyball to the creation of group swim lessons and summer camps. After the citywide shutdown in March, the Austin Y began piloting virtual programming that drew a nationwide audience. Since then, thousands of people have enjoyed a wide variety of programs that have included coffee clubs, kids’ yoga, virtual storytimes, senior fitness, Zumba and even bible study.

“Our Y has worked quickly in response to this public health crisis to meet community needs, whether by distributing thousands of pounds of food, providing child care to essential workers or performing outreach to isolated seniors,” Finck said. “The Virtual Y is yet another way that we are innovating to help people maintain their health while following safety guidelines.”

The Virtual YMCA is a benefit available to all full-facility YMCA of Austin members for no extra cost. An exclusive stand-alone Virtual YMCA membership is also available for $25 per month. More details are available at the YMCA of Austin homepage.

In the coming weeks. The Y will launch virtual Personal Training exclusively for members as well as Youth & Family programming. The Y is also currently offering fee-based virtual youth programs such as dance, martial arts, boxing, art and educational enrichment. More details are available at the Virtual Program Options portal of the YMCA of Austin website.

About the YMCA of Austin

The YMCA is a nonprofit organization that has served the Austin community since 1953, providing health and wellness, aquatics, youth sports, day camp, childcare, youth leadership and family enrichment opportunities for more than 100,000 members and 30,000 program participants annually. More information on the YMCA of Austin is available at the YMCA of Austin homepage.

This article originally appeared on the Austin Patch

Source Article

Virtual care after surgery may be more convenient for patients

Virtual follow-up care for surgical patients provides as much face time with doctors as in-person care, according to a new study.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, many surgical patients are being offered virtual follow-up appointments instead of in-person visits, the researchers noted.

Their study included 400 patients who had minimally invasive laparoscopic removal of their appendix or gallbladder at two North Carolina hospitals. They were randomly assigned to a post-discharge virtual or in-person visit.

The study began in August 2017 but was put on hold in March 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic, and only 64% of patients completed the follow-up visit.

Lead author Dr. Carolina Reinke said sometimes people are feeling so well after minimally invasive surgery that they don’t bother with the follow-up.

Total clinic time was longer for in-person visits than virtual visits — 58 minutes versus 19 minutes — but patients in both groups spent the same amount of time with a member of their surgical team — 8.3 minutes versus 8.2 minutes — discussing their recovery.

The findings were presented this month at a virtual meeting of the American College of Surgeons. Research presented at meetings is typically considered preliminary.

“I think it’s really valuable for patients to understand that, in the virtual space scenario, they are still going to get quality time with their surgical team,” said Reinke, an associate professor of surgery at Atrium Health in Charlotte, N.C. “A virtual appointment does not shorten that time, and there is still an ability to answer questions, connect, and address ongoing medical care.”

This is one of the first studies to compare virtual follow-up visits and face-to-face surgery follow-ups, according to the researchers.

“Other studies have looked at the total visit time, but they haven’t been able to break down the specific amount of time the patient spends with the provider. And we wanted to know if that was the same or different between a virtual visit and an in-person visit,” Reinke said.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on telemedicine.

Copyright 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Source Article