Man yanks out two teeth with rusty pliers after he couldn’t book dentist appointment

A desperate man resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out after being unable to book a dentist appointment.

Chris Savage performed the self-dentistry in his bedroom because he could not register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment, saying it was the ‘most horrible thing I’ve ever done.’

The 42 year old said he had been in ‘agony’ for days, saying that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of ‘agonising pain.’

The labourer admitted he had to get ‘very drunk’ by downing eight cans of Stella Artois to mask the pain before he pulled out the first tooth. He then waited another 24 hours to pull the second out – this time sober.

Chris said he was in ‘agony’ for days

Mr Savage, from Southsea in Portsmouth, said: “I ended up having to get very drunk the first time.

“Nobody wants to take part of their own face away with a set of pliers and no real painkillers.

“I put the pliers on my tooth and the second I did that it hurt.

“So I took them away, waited five minutes, built up again and then thought I’ve just got to do it.

Chris used a rusty set of pliers to take the teeth out

“It was a proper yank, a grip and pull – there’s no mucking about once you get to the point it’s started coming out.”

Mr Savage added that though there wasn’t much blood there was ‘enough to be scary’, and that it was ‘worth the risk of infection’.

The father of three didn’t register with an NHS dentist when he moved to Portsmouth from Alton, Hants, three years ago.

The teeth Chris pulled out himself

He lost his two front teeth in a bicycle crash last year, and when he began to experience pain recently he called around 20 dental practices, none of whom were taking on new patients.

He then phoned 111, who directed him to a practice that had volunteered to do triage appointments during the pandemic to help the NHS, but was referred back to 111 when he contacted them.

“It was like a massive game of pass the parcel”, he said.

Mr Savage signed up to receive Universal Credit during lockdown, leaving him with £50 a week for food and bills, meaning he was reluctant to spend the £100 per tooth it would have cost him to have them removed privately.

Chris lost his two front teeth in a bicycle crash last year

He said: “I could’ve waited a week – borrowed money, and had it done in hygienic conditions but there was no way I could’ve waited.

“Hygiene wasn’t going through my head, it was just ‘get this out’ – but the relief was worth it.

“The squelch noise as you pull

Man who couldn’t see a dentist pulls out own teeth

  • Chris Savage, 42, pulled out two of his own teeth at home in Southsea last week
  • Labourer lost his income during lockdown and couldn’t get a dental appointment
  • Portsmouth South MP called Mr Savage’s case ‘another example of the sad consequences of the Government failing to provide service levels required’ 

A labourer who lost his income during lockdown pulled out two of his own teeth with pliers and downed eight cans of Stella Artois to numb the pain because he couldn’t get a dental appointment due to the coronavirus crisis.

Chris Savage, 42, resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out in his bedroom because he couldn’t register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment, calling last Thursday’s procedure ‘the most horrible thing I’ve ever done’.

He said he had been in ‘agony’ for days, and revealed that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of ‘agonising pain’.

The labourer, from Southsea in Portsmouth, Hampshire, admitted to getting ‘very drunk’ beforehand by downing eight cans of Stella Artois to mask the pain before he pulled out the first tooth. He then waited a day before pulling out the second tooth.

His case has now been raised with the NHS by a health watchdog who said Mr Savage has been ‘severely let down’ by services in the city.

He said: ‘I ended up having to get very drunk the first time. Nobody wants to take part of their own face away with a set of pliers and no real painkillers.

‘I put the pliers on my tooth and the second I did that it hurt. So I took them away, waited five minutes, built up again and then thought I’ve just got to do it.

Chris Savage, 42, resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out in his bedroom because he couldn’t register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment
The labourer said he had been in ‘agony’ for days, and revealed that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of ‘agonising pain’

‘It was a proper yank, a grip and pull — there’s no mucking about once you get to the point it’s started coming out.’

Mr Savage added that though there wasn’t much blood there was ‘enough to be scary’, and that it was ‘worth the risk of infection’.

The father-of-three didn’t register with an NHS dentist when he moved to Portsmouth from Alton three years ago. He lost his two front teeth in a bicycle crash last year, and when he began to experience pain recently he called around 20 dental practices, none of whom were taking on new patients.

He then phoned 111, who directed him to a practice that had volunteered to do triage appointments during the pandemic to help the NHS, but was referred back to 111 when he contacted them.

‘It was like a massive game of pass the parcel’, he said.

Mr Savage signed up to receive

Coronavirus UK: Man who couldn’t see a dentist pulls out own teeth

A labourer who lost his income during lockdown pulled out two of his own teeth with pliers and downed eight cans of Stella Artois to numb the pain because he couldn’t get a dental appointment due to the coronavirus crisis.

Chris Savage, 42, resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out in his bedroom because he couldn’t register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment, calling last Thursday’s procedure ‘the most horrible thing I’ve ever done’.

He said he had been in ‘agony’ for days, and revealed that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of ‘agonising pain’.

The labourer, from Southsea in Portsmouth, Hampshire, admitted to getting ‘very drunk’ beforehand by downing eight cans of Stella Artois to mask the pain before he pulled out the first tooth. He then waited a day before pulling out the second tooth.

His case has now been raised with the NHS by a health watchdog who said Mr Savage has been ‘severely let down’ by services in the city.

He said: ‘I ended up having to get very drunk the first time. Nobody wants to take part of their own face away with a set of pliers and no real painkillers.

‘I put the pliers on my tooth and the second I did that it hurt. So I took them away, waited five minutes, built up again and then thought I’ve just got to do it.

Chris Savage, 42, resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out in his bedroom because he couldn't register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment

Chris Savage, 42, resorted to yanking two of his own teeth out in his bedroom because he couldn’t register with a dentist or book an emergency appointment

The labourer said he had been in 'agony' for days, and revealed that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of 'agonising pain'

The labourer said he had been in ‘agony’ for days, and revealed that just touching the tooth with his rusty pair of pliers set off waves of ‘agonising pain’

‘It was a proper yank, a grip and pull — there’s no mucking about once you get to the point it’s started coming out.’

Mr Savage added that though there wasn’t much blood there was ‘enough to be scary’, and that it was ‘worth the risk of infection’.

The father-of-three didn’t register with an NHS dentist when he moved to Portsmouth from Alton three years ago. He lost his two front teeth in a bicycle crash last year, and when he began to experience pain recently he called around 20 dental practices, none of whom were taking on new patients.

He then phoned 111, who directed him to a practice that had volunteered to do triage appointments during the pandemic to help the NHS, but was referred back to 111 when he contacted them.

‘It was like a massive game of pass the parcel’, he said.

Mr Savage signed up to receive Universal Credit during lockdown, leaving him with £50 a week for food and bills, meaning he was reluctant to spend the £100 per tooth it would have cost him to have them removed privately.

He said: ‘I could’ve waited a week — borrowed money, and had it done in hygienic

Portsmouth dad pulled his own teeth out as he couldn’t see dentist

Chris Savage, from Portsmouth, took a pair of pliers to his mouth after local dental practices told him they weren’t taking on any new patients (Picture: Solent News)

A dad who struggled to get a dental appointment during the pandemic had to resort to yanking his own teeth out after downing eight cans of Stella.  

Chris Savage, 42, became desperate after 20 local dental practices told him they weren’t accepting any new NHS patients.

After days in agony he took matters into his own hands but described it as the ‘most horrible thing I’ve ever done.’

Chris, from Southsea, Portsmouth, admitted he had to get ‘very drunk’ by downing eight cans of Stella Artois to mask the pain before he pulled out the first tooth. He then waited another 24 hours to pull the second out – this time sober.

He said: ‘I ended up having to get very drunk the first time. Nobody wants to take part of their own face away with a set of pliers and no real painkillers.

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‘I put the pliers on my tooth and the second I did that it hurt. So I took them away, waited five minutes, built up again and then thought I’ve just got to do it.

‘It was a proper yank, a grip and pull – there’s no mucking about once you get to the point it’s started coming out.’

The father-of-three didn’t register with an NHS dentist when he moved to Portsmouth from Alton, Hampshire, three years ago.

Chris Savage could only perform the emergency surgery on himself after getting drunk (Picture: Portsmouth News/Solent News)

He lost his two front teeth in a bicycle crash last year, and when he began to experience pain recently he called around local practices, none of whom were taking on new patients.

He then phoned 111, who directed him to a practice that had volunteered to do triage appointments during the pandemic to help the NHS, but was referred back to 111 when he contacted them.

‘It was like a massive game of pass the parcel’, he said.

Chris signed up to receive Universal Credit during lockdown after losing work as a self-employed labourer. This left him with £50 a week for food and bills, meaning he was reluctant to spend the £100 per tooth it would have cost him to have them removed privately.

He said: ‘I could’ve waited a week – borrowed money, and had it done in hygienic conditions but there was no way I could’ve waited.

He said it was the ‘most horrible thing I’ve ever done’ (Picture: Portsmouth News/Solent News)

‘Hygiene wasn’t going through my head, it was just “get this out” – but the relief was worth it.

‘The squelch noise as you pull it out is like nothing I’ve ever experienced and I thought “I’ve made a big mistake here”.

‘Then 10 minutes later there was a massive relief, but I couldn’t do that

How Tartar Can Cause Teeth Stains and More

Plaque doesn’t just remain plaque if left on your teeth — it forms into tartar, and that’s an entirely different concern.

Plaque is soft, sticky, and colorless and can be removed with regular brushing and flossing. If left alone, plaque hardens and bonds with your teeth to become tartar and needs to be removed by a dental professional, said Maged el-Malecki, DMD, the dental director at Boston Dental.

“Tartar develops when biofilm in our mouths combine with food byproducts — this then becomes mineralized from our saliva,” el-Malecki said. “Over 60 percent of people have at least some tartar buildup, which means it is a common oral health issue.”

He even described tartar as a porous “crusty blanket” that forms between your teeth and gum line and can easily trap stains and cause discoloration.

“Because we can’t remove tartar ourselves, many people wait a long time to seek treatment. While waiting, tartar can continue to build up and cause gum inflammation, gum recession, and, in severe cases, bone loss due to the bacteria that live in tartar, which produces toxins.”

While tartar-removing instruments (like metal picks) are available at your local pharmacy, el-Malecki strongly urges against using these products. Since the tartar-removing process requires specialised techniques using sharp tools, DIY approaches can very easily damage your gums.

“Generally, we use a scaler and an ultrasonic tip to remove tartar and stains while also flushing the gums with either distilled water or an antimicrobial solution,” he explained.

Regularly removing plaque from your teeth by brushing and flossing are the most effective ways you can prevent and eliminate tartar at home, el-Malecki said.

Despite one’s best efforts, though, sometimes accumulating small amounts of tartar buildup is unavoidable. That’s why it’s essential to make checkups and cleanings with your dentist a priority.

Click here for more health and wellness stories, tips, and news.

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Protect Your Teeth From Tartar Stains With This Dentist’s Hygiene Tips

Plaque doesn’t just remain plaque if left on your teeth – it forms into tartar, and that’s an entirely different concern.

Plaque is soft, sticky, and colorless and can be removed with regular brushing and flossing. If left alone, plaque hardens and bonds with your teeth to become tartar and needs to be removed by a dental professional, said Maged el-Malecki, DMD, the dental director at Boston Dental.

“Tartar develops when biofilm in our mouths combine with food byproducts – this then becomes mineralized from our saliva,” el-Malecki said. “Over 60 percent of people have at least some tartar buildup, which means it is a common oral health issue.”

He even described tartar as a porous “crusty blanket” that forms between your teeth and gum line and can easily trap stains and cause discoloration.

“Because we can’t remove tartar ourselves, many people wait a long time to seek treatment. While waiting, tartar can continue to build up and cause gum inflammation, gum recession, and, in severe cases, bone loss due to the bacteria that live in tartar, which produces toxins.”

Related: Plaque Can Contain 1,000 Different Bacteria – Here’s How to Keep Your Teeth Clean

While tartar-removing instruments (like metal picks) are available at your local pharmacy, el-Malecki strongly urges against using these products. Since the tartar-removing process requires specialized techniques using sharp tools, DIY approaches can very easily damage your gums.

“Generally, we use a scaler and an ultrasonic tip to remove tartar and stains while also flushing the gums with either distilled water or an antimicrobial solution,” he explained.

Regularly removing plaque from your teeth by brushing and flossing are the most effective ways you can prevent and eliminate tartar at home, el-Malecki said.

Despite one’s best efforts, though, sometimes accumulating small amounts of tartar buildup is unavoidable. That’s why it’s essential to make checkups and cleanings with your dentist a priority.

Click here for more health and wellness stories, tips, and news.

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Dangerous dentist ‘hacks’ are flooding TikTok as influencers grind down teeth with nail files & use BLEACH for whitening

SCRAPING a nail file down her front teeth, a young girl beams for the camera in scenes that would make any viewer grimace.

The shocking video is just one example of a disturbing new ‘DIY dentistry’ trend that sees TikTok influencers advise their fans on how to get a perfect smile.

Young TikTok users have filmed themselves filing their teeth down

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Young TikTok users have filmed themselves filing their teeth downCredit: TikTok/Miadio
One trend sees users pour bleach on their toothbrushes

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One trend sees users pour bleach on their toothbrushesCredit: TikTok/Miadio

From rubbing bleach on their teeth through to scraping enamel with activated charcoal to get pearly whites, some truly shocking ‘hacks’ are going viral on the video-sharing app.

However, experts are warning such reckless trends will not just cause lasting damage and stains, but can also lead to pain later in life.

Dr Kamala Aydazada, dentist and founder of Kensington Cosmetic Dentist, says: “People are spending longer hours staring at themselves on video calls, as well as following others on social media – many of whom use ‘picture perfect’ filters and Photoshop to enhance their profiles.

“For some, this may lead them resorting to drastic measures to achieve the results they want.”

Here, we take a closer look at just some of the hacks going viral on TikTok – and Dr Aydazada explains why she wouldn’t recommend trying them at home…

‘Once filed down they’ll never grow back’

In a toe-curling new trend on par with running your finger nails down a chalkboard, TikTok users have been ‘reshaping’ their teeth – using nail files.

Young people are attempting to take matters into their own hands to get the 'perfect smile'

12

Young people are attempting to take matters into their own hands to get the ‘perfect smile’Credit: TikTok / millennial_rdh
TikTok users are grinding down their teeth using nail files but dentists warn against it

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TikTok users are grinding down their teeth using nail files but dentists warn against itCredit: TikTok / millennial_rdh

TikTok user Mia Dio, who has 145K followers, was one of the first to try out the technique, with the video liked over 51K times.

After using the ill-advised method, she shows a close up of her perfect smile, saying: “Guys, it’s literally working!”

Despite a warning applied to the video stating it contains “potential dangerous action”, one user commented: “I’ve thought about doing this so many times… They look good!!!”

Another added: “Is this real??? Is it dangerous??? Wanna do it but I’m scared lol.”

The bizarre trend spread right across TikTok

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The bizarre trend spread right across TikTokCredit: Tiktok

Explaining why it’s so damaging, Dr Ayazada says: “The enamel of your teeth is really thin and once filed down, it will never grow back.

“This can cause a number of issues, making the affected areas appear dull and develop more stains over time due to surface irregularities.

“Your teeth may end up with sensitivity or pain and will become more prone to cavities. I would like to remind everyone that you only have one set of permanent teeth and should not compromise your health attempting this ill-advised TikTok trend.”

Whitening teeth with BLEACH

Some users have also started using three per cent hydrogen peroxide to whiten their teeth at home – a

Bremerton dentist seeing more cracked teeth, jaw pain due to stress over pandemic

Dentists across the country have noticed increases in cracked teeth and jaw pain. (Unsplash)

With the added stress of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis, there’s been a cascading effect on many people, specifically involving cracked teeth, jaw pain, and other dental health issues.

According to Bremerton dentist Dr. Peter Ruff, he’s been seeing more and more instances of patients with cracked teeth and complaining of jaw pain, a direct result of frequent teeth-grinding.

“This is a stressful time, and we are seeing more issues,” Dr. Ruff told KIRO Radio.

Patients found to have lingering COVID symptoms for months after illness

That’s a trend that’s been consistent not just in Washington too, with one Winnipeg dentist describing a “huge increase” in patients who grind their teeth, seeing as many as three or four people a week with jaw pain and headaches.

A dentist in San Diego has seen similar problems among his patients too — prior to the pandemic, Dr. Paul Koshgerian told CNN he was treating roughly one cracked tooth a day. Nowadays, he sees anywhere from two to five cases a day. Iowa dentist Dr. Derek Peek spotted the same trend, treating twice as many cracked teeth in August and September as he did in those months last year.

To mitigate grinding and jaw pain, Dr. Ruff recommends preventative dental care, something he says many people have put off since the pandemic began.

“If early detection of the problem is available, then early treatment relates to less pain, less discomfort, and less expense,” he advised.

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Wisdom Extraction and Broken Teeth Service Open 24/7

Press release content from Accesswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

24/7 emergency dental care is now available through Emergency Dentist Northville, MI. Their fast-response service connects patients to the best dentist to suit their needs near their current location

NORTHVILLE, MI / ACCESSWIRE / September 28, 2020 / Emergency Dentist Northville, MI has announced that it is now open for 24-hour care. Patients in the local area can get in touch for emergency dental or oral health needs, including broken teeth, bleeding gums, tooth extraction and more.

More information can be found at: https://www.emergencydentalservice.com/emergencydentist/northville-mi-charles-s-choueiry-dds-pc

As part of the new service launch, patients can get instant insurance verification and financing options to make treatments more accessible. The specialist dental team is also able to help those who don’t have insurance or the extra money to pay for their emergency treatment.

Emergency Dentist Northville, MI offers an affordable dental plan to help patients save money on dental care. Patients seeking fast dental checkups and emergency appointments are encouraged to get in touch, with the practice open 24 hours per day.

The new service launch gives peace of mind to local residents who are now able to book a dental appointment at any time of day. They have the security of knowing that whenever an issue occurs, they will be able to get specialist attention to help.

Dental emergencies can happen at any time, and it’s important for patients to know where they can go for treatment. Emergency Dental Service can connect patients to the best local dentist available to suit their needs.

Dr Charles Choueiry heads a highly trained team with the aim of providing the best emergency dental care to patients in Northville. Their clinic has developed a reputation for excellent service, with numerous five-star reviews on Google.

One recent patient said: “Dr. Charles Choueiry is the finest dentist I have ever had. I am always comfortable with his work. He has a friendly, and helpful staff. I am most impressed with his cosmetic work. I highly recommend him to anyone seeking the finest dental care.”

Common reasons for patients to seek emergency dental care include partially or fully dislodged teeth, broken teeth, severe toothache, and lost dental crowns. Regardless of the patient’s needs, Emergency Dentist Northville is able to help.

They also have services available to patients in Phoenix, Arizona, available at: https://www.emergencydentalservice.com/emergencydentist/phoenix-az-smile-dental-studio

Los Angeles emergency dental care is provided at: https://www.emergencydentalservice.com/emergencydentist/los-angeles-ca-dr-bruce-e-king

Contact Info:

Name: Dr. Charles Choueiry

Email: Send Email

Organization: Northville Smiles

Address: 418 N Center St, Northville, MI 48167, United States

Phone: +1-248-962-3422

Website: https://www.emergencydentalservice.com/emergencydentist/northville-mi-charles-s-choueiry-dds-pc

SOURCE: Northville Smiles

View source version on accesswire.com:

https://www.accesswire.com/608198/Northville-MI-Emergency-Dentist-Wisdom-Extraction-and-Broken-Teeth-Service-Open-247

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Brushing Your Teeth in the Shower Is OK

I’ve always admired my roommate’s early-bird tendencies. She claims that jumping in the shower immediately after her alarm goes off keeps her from crawling back in bed – doing her dental hygiene routine under that running water gets her fully alert and ready to take on the day, too.



a close up of a knife: Brushing Your Teeth in the Shower Is OK - as Long as You Follow This Dentist's Tips


© Getty / Andriya Hartanto / EyeEm / Andriya Hartanto / EyeEm
Brushing Your Teeth in the Shower Is OK – as Long as You Follow This Dentist’s Tips

At this point, I’ll do nearly anything to become a morning person, but I’ve had my suspicions about how sanitary it is to brush your teeth in the shower.

That’s why I chatted with David C. Gordon, DDS, a partner at the Gordon Center For General and Advanced Dentistry in Gaithersburg, MD, before reinventing my morning rituals. Overall, he doesn’t see many problems with brushing your teeth in the shower – he just warns that the approach doesn’t always set you up to practice good oral hygiene consistently.

“The most important thing is that everyone brushes their teeth twice a day for two minutes [at a time] with fluoride toothpaste and flosses once a day,” he says.

“Most people shower once a day, but everyone should brush their teeth twice a day. Brushing in the shower either sets people up to only brush once a day or rush brushing the second time because it is not part of their routine.”

Gordon believes that those who brush in the shower are less likely to floss and use mouthwash because it’s an added step outside their shower routine. He believes that keeping a waterpik (although it shouldn’t fully replace your floss!) and mouthwash in the shower could help keep you on track.

And while you’re upgrading your oral hygiene supplies for the shower, consider investing in a toothbrush holder that’ll keep yours upright and dry.

“It can be unhealthy to store your toothbrush in the shower, but it does not have to be. A toothbrush shouldn’t be wet or damp all the time. If the shower does not dry out, the toothbrush can’t dry out, and bacteria can grow on it,” he says.

“There are plenty of suction cup toothbrush holders available for purchase. Stay away from the ones that enclose the toothbrush bristles as they can prevent the toothbrush from drying, and that will help bacteria form.”

As long as you follow Gordon’s tips, practice good oral hygiene consistently, and your dentist says to keep doing what you’re doing come your six-month checkup, you should be OK to continue brushing your teeth in the shower.

Click here for more health and wellness stories, tips, and news.

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