Israel’s environment minister tests positive

JERUSALEM — A member of Israel’s Cabinet has tested positive for the coronavirus as the country remains under lockdown while battling a second wave of infection.



Ultra-Orthodox Jews pray and hold the four items used as a symbol on the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, as they keep social distancing and separated by plastic partitions during the current nationwide lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic in the Orthodox Jewish neighborhood of Mea Shearim in Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. The holiday commemorates the Israelites 40 years of wandering in the desert and a decorated hut is erected outside religious households as a sign of temporary shelter. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)


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Ultra-Orthodox Jews pray and hold the four items used as a symbol on the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, as they keep social distancing and separated by plastic partitions during the current nationwide lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic in the Orthodox Jewish neighborhood of Mea Shearim in Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. The holiday commemorates the Israelites 40 years of wandering in the desert and a decorated hut is erected outside religious households as a sign of temporary shelter. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)



An adult helps hold a child as his nasal swab sample is taken by a health worker at a COVID-19 testing center in Hyderabad, India, Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020. India has crossed 100,000 confirmed COVID-19 deaths on Saturday, putting the country's toll at nearly 10% of the global fatalities and behind only the United States and Brazil. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)


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An adult helps hold a child as his nasal swab sample is taken by a health worker at a COVID-19 testing center in Hyderabad, India, Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020. India has crossed 100,000 confirmed COVID-19 deaths on Saturday, putting the country’s toll at nearly 10% of the global fatalities and behind only the United States and Brazil. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)

Gila Gamliel, Israel’s environmental protection minister and a member of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud party, announced on Twitter Sunday that she had tested positive. She was the fourth minister in Israel’s government to test positive for COVID-19 since March.



People wear face masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19 as they stroll by the ancient Colosseum, in Rome, Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020. As of Saturday it is mandatory to wear masks outdoors in Lazio, the region that includes Rome. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)


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People wear face masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19 as they stroll by the ancient Colosseum, in Rome, Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020. As of Saturday it is mandatory to wear masks outdoors in Lazio, the region that includes Rome. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

“I feel good and hope to recover quickly with God’s help,” she wrote on social media.

The Israeli government imposed a nationwide lockdown on Sept. 18 ahead of the Jewish High Holidays in an effort to rein in a runaway outbreak of the coronavirus. The country has one of the highest daily infection rates per capita in the world.

According to Health Ministry figures, Israel has recorded over 264,000 cases and almost 1,700 deaths since the beginning of the pandemic.

___

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Doctor: Trump improving, but not ‘out of the woods’ yet

— Analysis: Trump faces credibility crisis over health scare



A health worker takes a nasal swab sample at a COVID-19 testing center in New Delhi, India, Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020. India has crossed 100,000 confirmed COVID-19 deaths on Saturday, putting the country's toll at nearly 10% of the global fatalities and behind only the United States and Brazil. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)


© Provided by Associated Press
A health worker takes a nasal swab sample at a COVID-19 testing center in New Delhi, India, Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020. India has crossed 100,000 confirmed COVID-19 deaths on Saturday, putting the country’s toll at nearly 10% of the global fatalities and behind only the United States and Brazil. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

— Pence ordered borders closed after CDC experts refused

— South Africa and India have asked the World Trade Organization to waive some provisions in the international agreements that regulate intellectual property rights to speed up efforts to prevent, treat and contain the COVID-19 pandemic.



Diners sit outside restaurants offering outdoor service as part of continued COVID-19 economic impact mitigation efforts, Saturday, Oct. 3, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)


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Diners sit outside restaurants offering outdoor service as part of continued COVID-19 economic impact

What We Know Of President Trump’s COVID-19 Diagnosis : Live Updates: Trump Tests Positive For Coronavirus : NPR

President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up as he leaves the White House to go to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after he tested positive for COVID-19.

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President Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up as he leaves the White House to go to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after he tested positive for COVID-19.

Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump tweeted early Friday morning that he tested positive for the coronavirus. But questions remain about what exactly happened before and after — when the president was first diagnosed, started experiencing symptoms and exactly what treatment he received and when.

On Saturday, White House Physician Sean Conley, for example, told reporters Trump was 72 hours into his diagnosis, but then said in a memo later on that he meant to say three days. Conley refused to say whether Trump had ever received supplemental oxygen this week, and another doctor said Trump received treatment 48 hours ago — also quickly walked back by the White House.

Here’s what we know about what happened when:

Saturday

President Trump hosted a ceremony in the White House Rose Garden to announce his nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, Amy Coney Barrett.

Eight people who attended the ceremony, including the president, have since tested positive for the coronavirus.

Later that night, Trump flew to Pennsylvania for an outdoor rally. Hope Hicks, one of Trump’s closest aides who would later test positive for the coronavirus, accompanied the president.

Tuesday

President Trump attended the presidential debate in Cleveland. Members of the Trump family and other guests of the president did not wear masks in the debate venue, despite being asked to by Cleveland Clinic staff.

Debate moderator Chris Wallace said on Fox yesterday that Trump wasn’t tested before attending the debate because he arrived late. They went on the honor system, he said.

Wednesday

Hope Hicks walk to Marine One to depart from the South Lawn of the White House on Wednesday.

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images


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Hope Hicks walk to Marine One to depart from the South Lawn of the White House on Wednesday.

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Trump flew to Minnesota for a fundraiser and an outdoor rally.

Hope Hicks reportedly started to feel unwell and tried to isolate on the Air Force One ride back to Washington.

Based on Conley’s initial reference to 72 hours since the diagnosis, that would mean Trump was diagnosed mid-day on Wednesday.

The White House later walked Conley’s reference back, saying it had not been 72 hours since the president was diagnosed, saying Conley meant to say it was day 3 since the diagnosis.

Thursday

Hicks reportedly received a positive coronavirus test on Thursday. She had also traveled with the president on Tuesday and Wednesday.

That afternoon, Trump flew to New Jersey for an indoor fundraiser where few people wore masks.

At Saturday’s press conference, Dr. Brian Garibaldi said the president began an experimental

At least 8 people who attended Supreme Court nomination ceremony have tested positive for COVID-19

At least eight people who have tested positive for coronavirus were in attendance at the Supreme Court nomination ceremony at the White House last weekend. The number of people in President Trump’s circle who tested positive for the virus is growing, following news of the president and first lady’s positive diagnoses early Friday morning. 

On Saturday, September 26, Mr. Trump nominated Judge Amy Coney Barrett to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court. He held an outdoor ceremony at the Rose Garden, which was attended by about 200 people — many of whom were not wearing masks or following social distancing guidelines. There are also photos of some of the attendees inside the White House on Saturday.

President Trump Announces His Supreme Court Nominee To Replace Justice Ginsburg
President Trump announces Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court in the Rose Garden at the White House on September 26, 2020. Seven people in attendance have since tested positive for COVID-19.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images


There is now growing concern that Mr. Trump contracted the virus at the ceremony, which could have possibly been a “super-spreader” event. Photos from the event show that chairs were not socially distanced, with many of the people who have tested positive sitting in close proximity. 

So far, at least eight people who attended that ceremony have tested positive for COVID-19: The president, first lady Melania Trump, former top aide Kellyanne Conway, former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, University of Notre Dame President John Jenkins, Senators Mike Lee of Utah and Thom Tillis of North Carolina and a White House reporter, according to the White House Correspondents’ Association.

Barrett tested positive for the virus over the summer and has since recovered, The Washington Post reports. 

Christie, who did not wear a mask to the event, announced his diagnosis on Saturday, tweeting “I will be receiving medical attention today.” Conway, who also did not wear a mask, announced her diagnosis late Friday, calling her symptoms “mild,” including a “light cough.”  

Lee, who was seen at the event hugging and kissing attendees without a mask, tweeted Friday that he had “symptoms consistent with longtime allergies” and would spend 10 days in isolation. Tillis, who did wear a mask, tweeted that he experienced no symptoms and will also isolate for 10 days. 

Lee appears to have been seated directly behind Vice President Mike Pence and Tillis was seated directly behind U.S. Attorney General William Barr. Both Pence and Barr announced that they tested negative for the virus on Friday.

President Trump Announces His Supreme Court Nominee To Replace Justice Ginsburg
Chairs at the September 26 nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court in the Rose Garden at the White House were not spaced six feet apart, and many attendees did not wear masks.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images


GOP Senator Ron Johnson, whose positive COVID-19 diagnosis was announced Saturday morning, did not attend Saturday’s event. He is the third Republican senator to test positive for the virus in two days.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer called to delay Barrett’s confirmation hearing following

President Trump hospitalized at Walter Reed after testing positive for COVID-19

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump arrived at the hospital Friday after he and first lady Melania Trump tested positive for COVID-19, raising fresh questions about the president’s health.

At recommendation of his physician, President Trump has been moved to Walter Reed hospital

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Trump, 74, went to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, in what aides said was a precautionary move. Officials said they expected him to be there for a few days.

Hours after arriving to the hospital, the White House released a memo from Sean Conley, the president’s physician, indicating Trump did not need to be put on oxygen but was starting remdesivir therapy, which is used for hospitalized adults who need oxygen but are not sick enough to require ventilation. Conley noted Trump was “doing very well,” had completed his first dose and was “resting comfortably.” 



a person wearing a suit and tie: A September 29, 2020 photo shows US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump upon arrival at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport in Cleveland, Ohio where Trump will be taking part in the first presidential debate.


© MANDEL NGAN, AFP via Getty Images
A September 29, 2020 photo shows US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump upon arrival at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport in Cleveland, Ohio where Trump will be taking part in the first presidential debate.

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Trump wrote on Twitter shortly before midnight that things were “going well, I think!” and thanked Americans for their support. 

Earlier Friday evening, Trump boarded Marine One, the presidential helicopter, en route to Walter Reed, which is about 9 miles away from the White House, in his first public appearance since he tested positive for the coronavirus. Wearing a mask and a navy suit and blue tie, he gave reporters the thumbs up as he walked across the lawn but did not stop to take questions. 

In taped remarks before his departure, Trump tried to assure the public that he and the first lady were doing well.

“I’m going to Walter Reed Hospital, I think I’m doing very well, but we’re going to make sure that things work out,” Trump said. “The first lady is doing very well. So thank you very much. I appreciate it.”

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said the president “remains in good spirits, has mild symptoms, and has been working throughout the day.” 

“Out of an abundance of caution, and at the recommendation of his physician and medical experts, the President will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days. President Trump appreciates the outpouring of support for both he and the First Lady,” she added.

The president’s diagnosis, which he tweeted just before 1 a.m. on Friday, sent shockwaves through Washington and across the country, causing markets to plummet just weeks before the presidential election. 

The president received a single 8 gram dose of Regeneron’s polyclonal antibody cocktail as a precautionary measure, according to a memo

Notre Dame president Rev. John Jenkins tests positive for coronavirus after White House SCOTUS ceremony

Jenkins was the latest prominent leader to announce an infection Friday, a day that began with the revelation that Trump and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive.

During his self-quarantine this week, Jenkins learned that a colleague with whom he had been in regular contact tested positive for the virus, according to an announcement sent to campus Friday afternoon. Jenkins was tested and found to be positive as well, so he is beginning “an extended period of isolation as indicated by University medical personnel and county health officials,” the announcement said.

In the statement to campus, Jenkins said, “My symptoms are mild and I will continue work from home. The positive test is a good reminder for me and perhaps for all of how vigilant we need to be.”

A spokeswoman for the university said there would be no further comment.

Last month, the prestigious Catholic university in Indiana switched to online instruction for two weeks, as virus cases rose rapidly in the early days of the term. Notre Dame, which has 12,000 students, resumed in-person classes earlier this month as officials determined the threat of an outbreak had diminished.

Jenkins is not the only university president to have gotten the virus — Harvard University’s president told the campus in March that he and his wife were ill, for example — but his attendance at the White House event raised questions.

Barrett is a professor of law at Notre Dame. Jenkins described the nomination ceremony in a letter to campus as a “historic event to support a faculty colleague and alumna of Notre Dame who is greatly respected by academic and judicial peers, revered by her students and cherished by her friends.”

But some students were shocked by photographs of Jenkins not wearing a mask at the ceremony in the Rose Garden, where guests sat close to one another.

Notre Dame requires certain behaviors for everyone on campus and has made clear that mask-wearing and physical distancing are “key responsibilities” for every member of the community.

Some students called for Jenkins’s resignation for failing to comply with the school’s health protocols. Students living on and off campus at Notre Dame have been held to the standards set forth by the school’s coronavirus rules, they wrote in a petition, “and those who have not adhered to safety guidelines have received disciplinary actions consistent with their indiscretion, including several students being dismissed from the University for gathering in large groups without masks.”

They wrote that Jenkins had frequently reminded them to hold one another accountable for the safety and well-being of everyone, “and he can no longer, in good conscience, call the student body, faculty and staff to adhere to the safety protocol that he ignores.”

On Thursday, the student senate voted down the resolution calling for his resignation with a 36-to-2 vote, according to Rachel Ingal, the president of Notre Dame’s student government. “Based on the dialogue in the room, the general sentiment was that there was a desire to

Live Updates: Trump Tests Positive For Coronavirus : NPR

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin departs from the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on September 30. Mnuchin is one of the people who had contact with President Trump in the past week and was subsequently tested for coronavirus and reported a negative result.

Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag


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Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin departs from the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on September 30. Mnuchin is one of the people who had contact with President Trump in the past week and was subsequently tested for coronavirus and reported a negative result.

Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

Several members of Congress and cabinet members who’ve spent time with President Trump in the last week were tested for coronavirus — and have announced the result was negative.

But that doesn’t mean they’re in the clear.

These results could be a false negative — which are common in people who’ve been infected with the virus during the first few days after exposure.

That’s because people who get infected with the coronavirus don’t test positive immediately. It takes several days after they’ve been exposed for the virus to show up in quantities that can be detected by tests, says Rachel Graham, a virologist who studies coronaviruses at the University of North Carolina.

“The average incubation period is about five days,” says Dr. Wafaa El-Sadr, an epidemiologist at Columbia University. That’s the period of time between exposure to the virus and the development of symptoms. “[Though] it could be as short as two days. Or it could be as long as 14 days.”

These estimates are based on a CDC-funded study of publicly reported cases of COVID-19 in January and February.

When someone breathes in droplets or small particles containing the virus, the virus enters the cells lining the nasal cavity and starts to make copies of itself. The first few days are a “tricky period,” Graham says, “where you may or may not have enough replication in the nose to detect [the virus].”

After a few days in the nasal cavity, the virus usually travels down into the lungs, where “it’s got a lot of cells to infect and a nice, warm humid environment to replicate in,” Graham explains. The host (in this case, Trump and his spouse) “can generate really, really high [quantities] of virus,” which move back up into the throat and nose, and spread back out to the world through sputum, snot and respiratory secretions.

This phase of infection — where there’s a much higher quantity of virus in the nose and throat — is when the coronavirus is most likely to be picked up by a swab and detectable in a test, Graham says, “So people are far more likely to test positive further past exposure than from a nasal swab a couple of days after exposure.” In other words, perhaps five days or more after the date of infection.

The incubation period

How long could I be contagious before a positive virus test?

How long could I be contagious before a positive virus test

How long could I be contagious before a positive virus test?

Studies have shown that people may be contagious for about two days before developing COVID-19 symptoms.

In fact, right before developing symptoms is when people are likely the most contagious, said Dr. Werner Bischoff, an infectious disease specialist at Wake Forest University.

People who never develop symptoms can spread infection, too. That’s a problem because many people would never seek testing unless they developed symptoms or knew they’d been exposed.

But there’s a more complicated part to this question: What if someone knows they were exposed but their virus test comes back negative — could they still be contagious?

Maybe.

A negative test within less than seven days after exposure “is a very, very poor indicator of whether you have virus on board,” said Dr. Alan Wells of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Some tests are less accurate than others, and you have to factor in the incubation period, he said.

A negative test between seven and 10 days of exposure is a better indicator, Wells said, but even then some people might not test positive until later.

“That is why if you have had a credible exposure, you should wear a mask and you should self-quarantine if there’s any question,” he said.

———

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How Shawn Johnson and Andrew East Reinforce Positive Body Image for Their 10-Month-Old Daughter

Shawn johnson/ instagram

Shawn Johnson and Andrew East are already committed to making sure their 10-month-old daughter, Drew Hazel, has a positive view of herself.

The couple recently opened up to PEOPLE about the small, and adorable, ways in which they reinforce a positive body image for Drew. The effort is especially important for Johnson, 28, who recently told fans about her struggles with eating disorders after competing in the 2008 Olympics as a gymnast.

For East, welcoming his daughter last November helped open his eyes to the burden of a negative body image.

“Now that I have a daughter, I feel like I have a different perspective on it, whereas before, I don’t think I really understood the body image issues as a male as much,” he tells PEOPLE.

“But now it’s something that I’m consciously trying to build in Drew as a positive self-image, because I know that our home is probably the best chance she has at getting positive reinforcement like that.”

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RELATED: Shawn Johnson & Andrew East: How Early Miscarriage Encouraged Them to Be Open About Their Parenting Journey

The NFL player, 29, went on to share that they have “a couple of fun traditions” they do as a family before Drew’s bath time. Often, they’ll stand in front of the mirror so Drew can see herself.

“I’ll say, ‘Oh, wow, look at the perfect baby,’ ” East adds of their bath time routine. “Just trying to do little things like that where she sees herself and relates it with positive things.”

Johnson says that as Drew gets older, they’ll continue to have conversations about body image. The athlete shared her own story, she says, “to tell more and more people that we’re not all perfect.”

“I wish as a kid, I had someone who had gone through that and had coached me through it and shared their journey so I didn’t feel alone,” Johnson says.

RELATED: Shawn Johnson ‘Was Really Scared’ Her Eating Disorder Would Return During Her Pregnancy

The couple have recently partnered with battery brand Duracell to get the word out about their lithium coin batteries, which have a bitter coating on them to discourage babies and small children from accidentally ingesting them.

“We’re new parents, and we have no idea what we’re doing, and we can research and prep and prepare and baby-proof all we want, but we’re still learning new things every single day,” Johnson says of the potential safety hazard. “It was just shocking to see that there was so much more we had to learn and to do to protect our baby.”

“There’s nothing that a baby won’t find that has potential to hurt them,” East adds. “And we’re in the phase now where Drew’s running around and we’re putting up the baby gates

How Long Could I Be Contagious Before a Positive Virus Test? | Science News

How long could I be contagious before a positive virus test?

Studies have shown that people may be contagious for about two days before developing COVID-19 symptoms.

In fact, right before developing symptoms is when people are likely the most contagious, said Dr. Werner Bischoff, an infectious disease specialist at Wake Forest University.

People who never develop symptoms can spread infection, too. That’s a problem because many people would never seek testing unless they developed symptoms or knew they’d been exposed.

But there’s a more complicated part to this question: What if someone knows they were exposed but their virus test comes back negative — could they still be contagious?

A negative test within less than seven days after exposure “is a very, very poor indicator of whether you have virus on board,” said Dr. Alan Wells of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Some tests are less accurate than others, and you have to factor in the incubation period, he said.

A negative test between seven and 10 days of exposure is a better indicator, Wells said, but even then some people might not test positive until later.

“That is why if you have had a credible exposure, you should wear a mask and you should self-quarantine if there’s any question,” he said.

The AP is answering your questions about the coronavirus in this series. Submit them at: [email protected]

Can the coronavirus travel more than 6 feet in the air?

How can I volunteer for a COVID0-19 vaccine study?

How can I tell the difference between the flu and COVID-19?

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Trump joins list of world leaders who have tested positive for coronavirus

President Trump has tested positive for the novel coronavirus, and in doing so, he joins a growing list of world leaders who have previously contracted the disease.

Since the start of the pandemic, at least seven major world leaders have tested positive for the virus, the most notable ones being Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Trump’s age, 74, places him within a category of people deemed to be at the highest risk of severe complications from the virus.

TOP CRITICS OFFER PRAYERS FOR PRESIDENT 

“People in their 60s or 70s are, in general, at higher risk for severe illness,” the CDC says on its website. “Severe illness means that the person with COVID-19 may require hospitalization, intensive care, or a ventilator to help them breathe, or they may even die.”

PRESIDENT TRUMP, FIRST LADY TEST POSITIVE FOR CORONAVIRUS, SET TO QUARANTINE AT WHITE HOUSE

Johnson, 55, was the first major world leader confirmed to have COVID-19 after he tested positive in March. He was subsequently moved to the intensive-care unit of St. Thomas’ Hospital in London after his symptoms got worse.

“Over the course of this afternoon, the condition of the prime minister has worsened and, on the advice of his medical team, he has been moved to the intensive care unit at the hospital,” a spokesman said at the time. “The PM is receiving excellent care, and thanks all [National Health Service] staff for their hard work and dedication.”

Johnson claimed it was “50-50” as to whether he’d have to be intubated, which is typically a last resort option for doctors. He credited the “wonderful, wonderful nursing” that he received while at the hospital. He also recorded a thank-you message to the staff that cared for him during his visit, which was released shortly after he was discharged from the hospital.

Bolsonaro, 65, was another notable leader who was previously infected. He reportedly tested positive for the virus three times between July 7 and July 21. While in quarantine at his presidential palace, he posted pictures of himself feeding birds and eating alone.

Bolsonaro has also said that he was taking the anti-malaria drug, hydroxychloroquine, which he has supported since the outbreak began, despite little evidence of its effectiveness. Before his diagnosis, he disregarded social distancing at lively demonstrations and encouraged crowds during outings from the presidential residence, often without a mask.

Juan Orlando Hernandez, the Honduras president was another leader to contract the virus. Hernandez, 51, announced in June that he and his wife had tested positive, along with two other people who worked closely with them. He was briefly hospitalized before being released in July.

Last month, Guatemalan President Alejandro Giammattei, 64 announced he had tested positive for the virus and would be working from home.

TRUMP RECEIVES WELL WISHES FROM TOP CRITICS AFTER CORONAVIRUS DIAGNOSIS

“My symptoms are very mild. Up to now, I have body aches, it hurt more yesterday than today, like a bad cold,” the president said during