Pauses of coronavirus antibody and vaccine trials are routine, doctor says

Two setbacks have been reported in 24 hours in the fight against the coronavirus. On Tuesday, drugmaker Eli Lilly halted human testing of a COVID-19 treatment citing a potential safety concern. A person familiar with the trial told CBS News the pause will last approximately two weeks.

The treatment, which uses COVID-19 antibodies, is similar to a therapeutic given to President Donald Trump that he touted as a cure. “It was like unbelievable,” Mr. Trump said. “I felt good immediately.”

This comes as Johnson & Johnson said its vaccine trial, the largest to date, is also stopping temporarily while it investigates if an unexplained illness was caused by its vaccine.

CBS News medical contributor Dr. David Agus said these pauses are routine and reassuring.

“So this is not unusual,” Agus said. “I hope that Americans see news like this and have comfort that we are investigating every single issue with these drugs and with these vaccines to make sure they are safe for the American people.”

Thirty-seven states are seeing a rise in average new cases; only one state — South Carolina — is down. A key driver is gatherings. A recent CDC report found that a 13-year-old girl infected 11 people staying at the same house during a family vacation, without masks or social distancing.

With many Americans resisting guidelines, the death toll continues to grow. Leanna Richardson lost her mother — a third-grade teacher from North Carolina — in just 10 days.

“And if anything else, let her death be a reminder that COVID-19 doesn’t care,” Richardson said. “COVID-19 is serious. This is a pandemic. This is not a joke.”

School officials at her mother’s school said they do not believe she contracted the virus at work where she was teaching students in person. 

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U.S. pauses Eli Lilly’s trial of a coronavirus antibody treatment over safety concerns

  • Eli Lilly’s phase three trial of its ACTIV-3 monoclonal antibody treatment for the coronavirus has been paused due to potential safety concerns.
  • The ACTIV-3 trial is designed to test a monoclonal antibody developed by Eli Lilly in combination with remdesivir, an antiviral with emergency use authorization for the virus.
  • It’s one of several ongoing trials, as part of the National Institute of Health’s “Activ” program, designed to accelerate the development of vaccine treatments in partnership with the pharmaceutical industry.



a group of people standing around a plane: In this May 2020 photo provided by Eli Lilly, researchers prepare mammalian cells to produce possible COVID-19 antibodies for testing in a laboratory in Indianapolis.


© Provided by CNBC
In this May 2020 photo provided by Eli Lilly, researchers prepare mammalian cells to produce possible COVID-19 antibodies for testing in a laboratory in Indianapolis.

Eli Lilly’s late-stage trial of its leading monoclonal antibody treatment for the coronavirus has been paused by U.S. health regulators over potential safety concerns, the company confirmed to CNBC on Tuesday.

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“Safety is of the utmost importance to Lilly. We are aware that, out of an abundance of caution, the ACTIV-3 independent data safety monitoring board (DSMB) has recommended a pause in enrollment,” a spokeswoman Molly McCully told CNBC. “Lilly is supportive of the decision by the independent DSMB to cautiously ensure the safety of the patients participating in this study.”

The company’s shares fell by about 3% in afternoon trading after the news started to leak out over Twitter.

The news comes less than 24 hours after Johnson & Johnson confirmed that its late-stage coronavirus vaccine trial was paused after a participant reported an “adverse event” the day before.

Dr. Mathai Mammen, global head of Janssen research and development at J&J, told investors on a conference call Tuesday that the company still has “very little information” on the reason for the holdup, including if the patient received the vaccine or the placebo. Preliminary information has been sent to the data safety monitoring board for review, he added.

Medical experts note that pauses in large clinical trials are not uncommon. They added it’s possible the bad reaction could be result of an unrelated illness, and not the drug itself. The review from the data and safety monitoring board will help determine that.

Video: Dr. Scott Gottlieb on remdesivir Covid-19 treatment study: ‘Results were strong’ (CNBC)

Dr. Scott Gottlieb on remdesivir Covid-19 treatment study: ‘Results were strong’

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The ACTIV-3 trial is designed to test a monoclonal antibody developed by Eli Lilly in combination with Gilead Sciences’ remdesivir, an anti-viral with emergency use authorization for the virus. It’s one of several ongoing trials that are part of the National Institute of Health’s “Activ” program, which is designed to accelerate the development of Covid-19 vaccines and treatments. It is also backed by Operation Warp Speed, the Trump administration’s effort to manufacturer and distribute vaccines to fight Covid-19.

Eli Lilly’s drug is part of a class of treatments known as monoclonal antibodies, which are made to act as immune cells that scientists hope can fight the virus. The treatment was developed using a blood sample from one of the

Johnson & Johnson Pauses COVID-19 Vaccine Clinical Trials over Participant’s ‘Unexplained Illness’

Johnson & Johnson has paused its late stage clinical trials for a COVID-19 vaccine because of an “unexplained” illness in one of the participants, the company said Monday. 

It said in a news release that the trial was paused while the study’s independent Data Safety Monitoring Board conducted a review and evaluation of the participant’s condition.

“Adverse events — illnesses, accidents, etc. — even those that are serious, are an expected part of any clinical study, especially large studies.”

The company noted the “significant distinction” between a study pause and a regulatory hold, explaining that a pause is not unexpected in vaccine trials. 

“A study pause, in which recruitment or dosing is paused by the study sponsor, is a standard component of a clinical trial protocol,” the statement said.

Johnson & Johnson’s coronavirus vaccine became the fourth to begin Phase 3 trials in the United States last month and becomes the second to be paused in the U.S. after AstraZeneca’s vaccine trial was put on hold last month after a volunteer in Britain developed a neurological complication.

AstraZeneca’s trial has resumed in Britain, but is still paused in the United States as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration carries out an investigation.

Johnson & Johnson did not reveal the specifics of the unexplained illness but will be conducting a review to see if it is related to the vaccine. 

“We must respect this participant’s privacy. We’re also learning more about this participant’s illness, and it’s important to have all the facts before we share additional information,” the company said.

“Serious adverse events are not uncommon in clinical trials, and the number of serious adverse events can reasonably be expected to increase in trials involving large numbers of participants. Further, as many trials are placebo-controlled, it is not always immediately apparent whether a participant received a study treatment or a placebo.”

When the trial’s move to Phase 3 was announced last month, the National Institutes of Health said it would involve up to 60,000 participants. 

The company’s vaccine is one of six being tested in the U.S. in the race to find an effective vaccine to ease the pandemic that has killed more than 215,000 Americans.

Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine requires only one dose of vaccine, so federal officials have expressed hope that testing can be carried out faster than studies of other vaccines which will require two doses, such as those made by Moderna and Pfizer, CNN reported. 

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J&J Pauses Coronavirus Vaccine Trials Due to Unexplained Illness | Top News

(Reuters) – Johnson & Johnson

has paused clinical trials of its coronavirus vaccine candidate due to an unexplained illness in a study participant, delaying one of the highest profile efforts to contain the global pandemic.

The move comes around a month after AstraZeneca

also suspended trials of its experimental coronavirus vaccine – which uses a similar technology – due to a participant falling ill.

J&J said on Monday the illness was being reviewed by an independent data and safety monitoring board as well as the U.S. group’s clinical and safety physicians.

The company, which reports quarterly financial results on Tuesday morning, said such pauses are normal in big trials, which can include tens of thousands of people.

It added the voluntary “study pause” in giving doses of the vaccine candidate was different from a “regulatory hold” imposed by health authorities.

AstraZeneca last month paused late-stage trials of its experimental coronavirus vaccine developed with the University of Oxford due to an unexplained illness in a British study participant.

While AstraZeneca’s trials in Britain, Brazil, South Africa and India have since resumed, its U.S. trial is still on hold, pending a regulatory review.

The J&J and AstraZeneca vaccines are both based on a so-called adenovirus, a harmless modified virus that instructs human cells to produce vaccine proteins.

They are both also part of the U.S. government’s Operation Warp Speed programme to support vaccine development.

“This could be a second case of adenoviral vaccine to spur safety concerns,” said Bryan Garnier analyst Olga Smolentseva.

AstraZeneca and medical experts say trial suspensions to look into the cause of a participant’s illness are not uncommon. Underwriters of clinical trial insurance have said premiums for coronavirus vaccines studies are only marginally higher than for pre-pandemic vaccines.

J&J on Sept. 22 became the fourth Warp-Speed participant to enter the final stage of testing on humans, with the aim of enrolling 60,000 volunteers in the United States and abroad.”Everybody is on the alert because of what happened with AstraZeneca,” Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of infectious diseases at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, said by email, adding it could take a week to gather information.

“This is likely to be a neurological event,” he said. Last month, J&J said its vaccine candidate produced a strong immune response in an early-to-mid stage clinical trial. This prompted the company to start the large scale trial, with results expected by the end of this year or early 2021.

J&J declined to elaborate on the illness due to privacy concerns. It did say some participants in studies get placebos, and it was not always clear whether a person suffering a serious adverse event in a trial received a placebo or the treatment.

Stat News reported https://www.statnews.com/2020/10/12/johnson-johnson-covid-19-vaccine-study-paused-due-to-unexplained-illness-in-participant/?utm_content=buffer37312&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=twitter_organic the pause earlier, citing a document sent to outside researchers, which stated that a “pausing rule” had been met, the online system used to enroll patients in the study had been closed and the data and safety monitoring board would be convened.

(Reporting by Ayanti

J&J pauses coronavirus vaccine trials due to unexplained illness

(Reuters) – Johnson & Johnson JNJ.N has paused clinical trials of its coronavirus vaccine candidate due to an unexplained illness in a study participant, delaying one of the highest profile efforts to contain the global pandemic.

The move comes around a month after AstraZeneca AZN.L also suspended trials of its experimental coronavirus vaccine – which uses a similar technology – due to a participant falling ill.

J&J said on Monday the illness was being reviewed by an independent data and safety monitoring board as well as the U.S. group’s clinical and safety physicians.

The company, which reports quarterly financial results on Tuesday morning, said such pauses are normal in big trials, which can include tens of thousands of people.

It added the voluntary “study pause” in giving doses of the vaccine candidate was different from a “regulatory hold” imposed by health authorities.

AstraZeneca last month paused late-stage trials of its experimental coronavirus vaccine developed with the University of Oxford due to an unexplained illness in a British study participant.

While AstraZeneca’s trials in Britain, Brazil, South Africa and India have since resumed, its U.S. trial is still on hold, pending a regulatory review.

The J&J and AstraZeneca vaccines are both based on a so-called adenovirus, a harmless modified virus that instructs human cells to produce vaccine proteins.

They are both also part of the U.S. government’s Operation Warp Speed programme to support vaccine development.

“This could be a second case of adenoviral vaccine to spur safety concerns,” said Bryan Garnier analyst Olga Smolentseva.

AstraZeneca and medical experts say trial suspensions to look into the cause of a participant’s illness are not uncommon. Underwriters of clinical trial insurance have said premiums for coronavirus vaccines studies are only marginally higher than for pre-pandemic vaccines.

J&J on Sept. 22 became the fourth Warp-Speed participant to enter the final stage of testing on humans, with the aim of enrolling 60,000 volunteers in the United States and abroad.”Everybody is on the alert because of what happened with AstraZeneca,” Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of infectious diseases at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, said by email, adding it could take a week to gather information.

“This is likely to be a neurological event,” he said. Last month, J&J said its vaccine candidate produced a strong immune response in an early-to-mid stage clinical trial. This prompted the company to start the large scale trial, with results expected by the end of this year or early 2021.

J&J declined to elaborate on the illness due to privacy concerns. It did say some participants in studies get placebos, and it was not always clear whether a person suffering a serious adverse event in a trial received a placebo or the treatment.

Stat News reported here the pause earlier, citing a document sent to outside researchers, which stated that a “pausing rule” had been met, the online system used to enroll patients in the study had been closed and the data and safety monitoring board would be convened.

Reporting

Johnson & Johnson pauses COVID vaccine trial over sick participant

Washington — Johnson & Johnson said Monday that it had temporarily halted its COVID-19 vaccine trial because one of its participants had become sick.



a woman with her mouth open: nurse giving a woman a vaccine injection.jpg


© Johnson & Johnson
nurse giving a woman a vaccine injection.jpg

“We have temporarily paused further dosing in all our COVID-19 vaccine candidate clinical trials, including the Phase 3 ENSEMBLE trial, due to an unexplained illness in a study participant,” the company said in a statement.

The pause means the enrollment system has been closed for the 60,000-patient clinical trial while the independent patient safety committee is convened.

J&J said that serious adverse events (SAEs), such as accidents or illnesses, are “an expected part of any clinical study, especially large studies.” Company guidelines allow them to pause a study to determine if the SAE was related to the drug in question and whether to resume study.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Doctor prefers masks to vaccine right now 00:45


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The J&J Phase 3 trial had started recruiting participants in late September, with a goal of enrolling up to 60,000 volunteers across more than 200 sites in the U.S. and around the world, the company and the U.S. National Institutes for Health (NIH), which is providing funding, said.

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The other countries where the trials were taking place are Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru and South Africa.

J&J was the tenth maker globally to conduct a Phase 3 trial against COVID-19, and the fourth in the U.S. The U.S. government has given J&J about $1.45 billion in funding under Operation Warp Speed to develop its vaccine candidate.

The vaccine is based on a single dose of a cold-causing adenovirus, modified so that it can no longer replicate, combined with a part of the new coronavirus called the spike protein that it uses to invade human cells.

J&J used the same technology in its Ebola vaccine which received marketing approval from the European Commission in July.



a person preparing food in a kitchen: Is a coronavirus vaccine possible in 2020? 07:53


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Is a coronavirus vaccine possible in 2020? 07:53

Pre-clinical testing on rhesus macaque monkeys that were published in the journal Nature showed it provided complete or near-complete protection against virus infection in the lungs and nose. Like several other Phase 3 trials that are underway, its primary objective is to test whether the vaccine can prevent symptomatic COVID-19.

In September, trials on the coronavirus vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University were paused after a U.K. volunteer developed an unexplained illness.

The vaccine is one of the most advanced Western projects, having already been tested on tens of thousands of volunteers worldwide. Trials resumed earlier this month in Japan but not the United States, where AstraZeneca is still working with regulators.

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J&J pauses COVID-19 vaccine trials due to illness [Video]

Johnson & Johnson announced Monday (October 12) it’s temporarily paused trials for a COVID-19 vaccine after a participant in the study fell ill for unknown reasons.

The news delays one of the highest profile efforts to contain the global pandemic.

And also another major setback in the race for a COVID-19 vaccine, after AstraZeneca paused late-stage trials of its vaccine candidate last month, also due to unexplained illness in a trial participant.

Johnson and Johnson said in a statement that their participant’s illness is being reviewed and evaluated by an independent monitoring board as well as the company’s clinical and safety physicians.

The company said that the current “study pause” in giving doses of the vaccine was different from a “regulatory hold” required by health authorities.

It added that such pauses are normal in big trials, which can include tens of thousands of people.

J&J had kicked off its final 60,000-person trial just last month, the results of which were expected by the end of this year or early 2021.

Johnson & Johnson declined to elaborate on the participant’s illness due to privacy concerns.

But the company says that some participants in studies get placebos, and it can be unclear whether a person suffering a serious illness in a clinical trial received a placebo or the treatment.

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Johnson & Johnson pauses clinical trials for a COVID vaccine over patient illness

Johnson & Johnson has paused its clinical trials for a COVID-19 vaccine following a patient illness, just weeks after it announced it was in its final stage.

A pause is not entirely unexpected in vaccine trials. When another vaccine trial was temporarily stopped last month, experts hailed the move, pointing to it as an example of the scientific rigor that is being maintained despite the understandably intense public interest for a COVID-19 vaccine.

The Johnson & Johnson trial was paused after an “unexplained” illness in one of its participants and in compliance with regulatory standards, the company said in a news release Monday night. The pharmaceutical company said the patient’s condition was being reviewed and evaluated by the ENSEMBLE independent Data Safety Monitoring Board.

“We must respect this participant’s privacy,” the company’s statement said. “We’re also learning more about this participant’s illness, and it’s important to have all the facts before we share additional information.”

It’s unclear whether the patient received the experimental vaccine or were in the placebo-control group.

AstraZeneca also started its Phase 3 vaccine trial last month but was placed on pause in the U.S. after a participant in the United Kingdom was reported to have developed a spinal cord injury. The company resumed its trial with Oxford University in the U.K. but was awaiting Food and Drug Administration approval to continue in the U.S.

Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, told NBC News last month that the pause should reassure those with concerns about possible vaccine safety issues.

“If anybody thinks we’re just glossing over these kinds of issues in the big rush to approve a vaccine, this ought to be reassuring,” Collins said during a “Doc to Doc” interview with NBC News medical correspondent Dr. John Torres, which was streamed on Facebook.

Pfizer and Moderna also have vaccine trials that went into Phase 3 in July, both of which require two doses about a month apart. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is instead administered in one dose, avoiding the complicated coordination to require that people return in time for the second dose.

Johnson & Johnson announced last week that European Commission approved an advance purchase agreement from its parent company, Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies, for 200 million doses of the vaccine to E.U. member states following approval. The company also said it was looking to allocate up to 500 million vaccine doses toward international efforts for low-income nations.

This story originally appeared on NBCNews.com.

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