Beyond Celiac Chosen by 9 Meters Biopharma as Exclusive Patient Organization to Recruit for First-Ever Phase 3 Clinical Trial

Premier Patient Recruiter for Celiac Disease Research, Beyond Celiac Taps Extensive Network to Advance Study

Go Beyond Celiac, an online patient database launched in 2017, allows its thousands of users to participate in research by sharing their celiac disease stories and experiences and learn how to become involved in research studies such as the Phase 3
Go Beyond Celiac, an online patient database launched in 2017, allows its thousands of users to participate in research by sharing their celiac disease stories and experiences and learn how to become involved in research studies such as the Phase 3
Go Beyond Celiac, an online patient database launched in 2017, allows its thousands of users to participate in research by sharing their celiac disease stories and experiences and learn how to become involved in research studies such as the Phase 3

Philadelphia, PA, Oct. 14, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Beyond Celiac, the leading catalyst for a celiac disease cure in the United States, today announced it has been chosen by 9 Meters Biopharma, Inc. (Nasdaq: NMTR) as the exclusive patient organization to recruit for the first-ever Phase 3-stage clinical trial therapeutic for treatment of celiac disease. Beyond Celiac will use its unrivaled connection to the celiac disease community and its powerful online patient database to recruit participants for the study of larazotide acetate, which aims to address leaky gut in celiac disease.

“We really listen to our community’s wants and needs. Because of our extensive connection to the people and commitment to connecting researchers with our community, Beyond Celiac has become the partner of choice for leading biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies such as 9 Meters,” said Beyond Celiac CEO Alice Bast. “This is the furthest a celiac disease clinical trial has gone, and it’s an exciting opportunity for our organization to play a vital role in fulfilling its promise.”

9 Meters Biopharma is evaluating larazotide acetate for celiac disease patients who continue to experience gastrointestinal symptoms while following a gluten-free diet. Designed to tighten junctions between intestinal cells, larazotide acetate would act like shoelaces to help restore leaky junctions to a normal state and would be used in addition to the gluten-free diet. It is being tested at more than 100 clinical sites, with a goal of 525 study participants. Results are expected by the end of 2021.

By partnering with Beyond Celiac for recruitment, 9 Meters Biopharma now has access to the power of Go Beyond Celiac, a secure online patient database with thousands of users who share their celiac disease stories and experiences with researchers and seek to become involved in studies.

“Our conservative estimate is that our celiac disease program is at least two years ahead of everyone else’s,” said John Temperato, president and CEO of 9 Meters Biopharma. “Beyond Celiac is going to help us across the finish line in developing the effective treatments that celiac patients deserve.”

Celiac disease is a serious genetic autoimmune disorder that affects an estimated 1 in 133 Americans, more than half of whom are still undiagnosed. The disease causes damage to the small intestine, resulting in debilitating symptoms, and if left untreated, can lead to serious long-term health problems including infertility and some types of cancer.

 

About Beyond Celiac

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Johnson & Johnson pauses clinical trials for a COVID vaccine over patient illness

Johnson & Johnson has paused its clinical trials for a COVID-19 vaccine following a patient illness, just weeks after it announced it was in its final stage.

A pause is not entirely unexpected in vaccine trials. When another vaccine trial was temporarily stopped last month, experts hailed the move, pointing to it as an example of the scientific rigor that is being maintained despite the understandably intense public interest for a COVID-19 vaccine.

The Johnson & Johnson trial was paused after an “unexplained” illness in one of its participants and in compliance with regulatory standards, the company said in a news release Monday night. The pharmaceutical company said the patient’s condition was being reviewed and evaluated by the ENSEMBLE independent Data Safety Monitoring Board.

“We must respect this participant’s privacy,” the company’s statement said. “We’re also learning more about this participant’s illness, and it’s important to have all the facts before we share additional information.”

It’s unclear whether the patient received the experimental vaccine or were in the placebo-control group.

AstraZeneca also started its Phase 3 vaccine trial last month but was placed on pause in the U.S. after a participant in the United Kingdom was reported to have developed a spinal cord injury. The company resumed its trial with Oxford University in the U.K. but was awaiting Food and Drug Administration approval to continue in the U.S.

Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, told NBC News last month that the pause should reassure those with concerns about possible vaccine safety issues.

“If anybody thinks we’re just glossing over these kinds of issues in the big rush to approve a vaccine, this ought to be reassuring,” Collins said during a “Doc to Doc” interview with NBC News medical correspondent Dr. John Torres, which was streamed on Facebook.

Pfizer and Moderna also have vaccine trials that went into Phase 3 in July, both of which require two doses about a month apart. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is instead administered in one dose, avoiding the complicated coordination to require that people return in time for the second dose.

Johnson & Johnson announced last week that European Commission approved an advance purchase agreement from its parent company, Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies, for 200 million doses of the vaccine to E.U. member states following approval. The company also said it was looking to allocate up to 500 million vaccine doses toward international efforts for low-income nations.

This story originally appeared on NBCNews.com.

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Disgruntled patient sent back to prison for stalking his dentist

Thomas Baddeley, 42, spent four years trailing orthodontist Dr Ian Hutchinson, 53, to plot revenge over his dental treatment at his private practice called the 'Smile Lounge'

Thomas Baddeley, 42, spent four years trailing orthodontist Dr Ian Hutchinson, 53, to plot revenge over his dental treatment at his private practice called the ‘Smile Lounge’

An resentful patient was arrested for stalking his dentist – just weeks after being released from prison for having a ‘murder kit’ in his car.

Thomas Baddeley, 42, spent four years trailing orthodontist Dr Ian Hutchinson, 53, to plot revenge over his dental treatment at his private practice called the ‘Smile Lounge’.

The former patient kept a crossbow, mask and kitchen knife hidden in his car which he planned to use to carry out the attack.

The court heard Baddeley even bought 30 different second-hand cars so he would not be spotted driving past the dentists’s home and work.

He was jailed for 16 months for stalking Dr Hutchinson – and ordered to stay away when he was released from behind bars last month.

But a court heard Baddeley was spotted by a police officer cycling past Dr Hutchinson’s surgery in breach of the restraining order.

Baddeley is today back behind bars after being remanded in custody by a judge for breaking the ‘stay away’ court order.

Businessman Baddeley even made a chilling timetable for ‘The Event’ including notes about how to avoid leaving fingerprints and what he should say to the police if caught.

Baddeley, of Montpellier, Bristol, admitted stalking and possessing a knife and an offensive weapon – rather than more serious charges.

He was first jailed in August after officers found a 'murder kit' including a crossbow (pictured), black ski mask, and a kitchen knife in his car. He was released in September due to time spent in prison awaiting trial

He was first jailed in August after officers found a ‘murder kit’ including a crossbow (pictured), black ski mask, and a kitchen knife in his car. He was released in September due to time spent in prison awaiting trial

The fact that his victim was unaware meant Baddeley could not be charged with a more serious stalking offence carrying a maximum jail term of 10 years.

He was sentenced to 16 months jail in August but released last month because of the time he spent in custody awaiting trial.

But on Friday he was back in court to plead guilty to breaching a restraining order by going to Dr Hutchinson’s surgery in Chepstow, Monmouthshire.

District Judge Martin Brown said his ‘obsession’ was continuing and he would be sentenced on 23 October at Cardiff Crown court.

However, Judge Brown said the case had had a huge impact on Dr Hutchinson.

‘This is a very unhealthy obsession because there has been no other explanation presented to the court,’ he said.

Dr Hutchinson (pictured) had no idea his ex-patient was stalking him until the police knocked on his door - and was left 'extremely distressed'

 Dr Hutchinson (pictured) had no idea his ex-patient was stalking him until the police knocked on his door – and was left ‘extremely distressed’

‘The only reason you were in the Chepstow area was to continue your obsession.’

The previous court heard Baddeley staked out the dentists’s home and work in several different cars to work out his routine in a plan to carry out his dark revenge.

But he was caught when a worried neighbour spotted him sitting in a car with a black balaclava hood – and police

Hospital Debates Penis Transplant in Transgender Patient

In a move that could revolutionize gender-reassignment surgery, hospital officials in Boston are considering whether to allow a first-ever penis transplant in a transgender man. Surgeons hope to attach a dead man’s penis to the groin of a patient born as a biological female.

“This would be a quantum leap if you were able to transplant a real penile structure. It’s certainly pushing the boundaries,” Curtis Cetrulo, MD, a plastic and reconstructive surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital, told MedPage Today. “We’re ready to do it, and we could do it pretty soon if we get it approved. I’m hopeful we can do it. It would be super-helpful to a lot of these [transgender] patients.”

Surgeons in the U.S. and South Africa have only performed a handful of successful penis transplants, all in adult men who lost their genitals to cancer or trauma. Cetrulo led a landmark 2016 transplant surgery in a 64-year-old man who’d had a penectomy due to cancer. In a 14-hour procedure in 2019, Johns Hopkins University surgeons successfully attached a penis, scrotum, and parts of abdominal wall to a soldier who was severely injured in a bomb blast in Afghanistan. Surgeons reported successful recovery of urinary and sexual function in both cases.

There are no generally accepted penis-transplant guidelines nor agreement about whether the procedure is appropriate for transgender patients. MGH currently allows the transplant in men who have congenital penis defects or who lost their penises to injury or cancer. Officials are considering whether to expand the existing protocol to allow the surgery in a specific transgender patient, Cetrulo said.

The main objectives of penis transplants are to provide an aesthetic phallus, urinary function, and sexual function (including erections and “erogenous sensitivity”), he said.

While outcomes remain unknown, the prospect of penis transplants in transgender men is “huge,” California gender reassignment surgeon Marci Bowers, MD, told MedPage Today. “This is like a heart transplant to someone who has end-stage heart disease. It’s that big. Prior methods were just so substandard in so many ways.”

As Bowers noted, phalloplasties – in which phalluses are constructed from flaps of skin – have complication rates of 80% to 90%, and that’s not the only limitation. Oregon activist and author Jamison Green, PhD, a transgender man, told MedPage Today that phalloplasties “don’t have the same aesthetic appeal [as natural penises] and they don’t enlarge and get hard on their own. They’re always the same size.”

Metoidioplasties are another option for transgender men, but they also have limitations. In these procedures, surgeons form neophalluses out of clitoral tissue. The phalluses are disappointingly small, Green said. “You do have an erection and it can stay hard. Some people are capable of penetrating a partner, and some are not.”

Compared to these existing options, Cetrulo said, a penis transplant ideally will offer “fewer urethral complications, better cosmetic outcome, and better physiological sexual capacity.”

Still, limitations include the fact that transgender men who receive penis transplants will not be able to ejaculate since

Former nurse and patient advocate is looking for a kidney. Now the mother of 4 has to advocate for herself

CHICAGO — Registered nurse Christine Hernandez was just entering her 40s when she asked her doctors about her kidney function.



a person sitting on a table: Christine Hernandez preps herself for dialysis at her home Sept. 18, 2020, in Chicago, Ill. Hernandez, a registered nurse, is suffering from stage 5 kidney failure. She has set up her sunroom as a "hemo center," where she performs all of the duties necessary for her dialysis.


© Stacey Wescott/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Christine Hernandez preps herself for dialysis at her home Sept. 18, 2020, in Chicago, Ill. Hernandez, a registered nurse, is suffering from stage 5 kidney failure. She has set up her sunroom as a “hemo center,” where she performs all of the duties necessary for her dialysis.

Knowing she had two brothers with kidney disease, she asked her primary care physician for a referral to a nephrologist.

Hernandez recalls her doctor saying that her kidney lab results were good, and there was no reason she should see a nephrologist. But Hernandez, a Chicago mother of four, said she had a feeling she had kidney disease too.

The referral was given, and the nephrologist biopsied her kidneys in 2016. Her kidneys were operating at only 30% of capacity, and that was without having symptoms, she said.

“I was just flabbergasted,” she said. “I cried. All these things went through my head really fast: I was like, ‘I have little kids. What’s going to happen to them? I’m a nurse; I’m supposed to help people. What’s going to happen to my career?’ I was in fight or flight mode — trying to figure out how could I fix it because in the medical field you could fix everything, right?

“Well, you can fix everything but a kidney. I asked my nephrologist if we can put a stent inside my kidney to open up, so it could get blood flow through it, and he says it’s too late for that.”

Hernandez was diagnosed with medullary cystic kidney disease, an inherited condition that ends in kidney failure. In Hernandez’s case, the condition resulted in her arteries atrophying. Her doctor recommended going on a strict diet and seeing a nephrologist often. But eventually she would need dialysis and a transplant. In a matter of four years, Hernandez says her condition has progressed pretty fast. She went from 10-hour days advocating for patients in hospitals to spending almost eight hours a day four days a week preparing, using and breaking down her home hemodialysis device, which purifies her blood. She’s on three different regional transplant lists around the country and hopes to add more. She’s also seeking a donor on her own via Facebook. Her family’s history of kidney disease prevents a relative from donating, she said.

“I’m just fighting for my life,” Hernandez said. “I’m trying to get my life back and live for my kids and go back to nursing, believe it or not. A lot of nurses are like, ‘Oh, with your condition, nurses would retire.’ But I’m not your average nurse. I want to go back and pay it forward; I want to help people.”

Hernandez, who worked with high-risk moms and babies at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and in the neonatal intensive care unit at Mount Sinai Hospital, will tell her story to a virtual audience Oct.

Chesapeake Regional Information System for Our Patients (CRISP) Selects Get Real Health for Patient Portal Solution

Maryland Patients Will Have Secure Access to Their Health Data Starting With COVID-19 Test Results

Get Real Health, a member of the CPSI (NASDAQ: CPSI) family of companies and a provider of comprehensive patient engagement tools, announced today that the Chesapeake Regional Information System for our Patients (CRISP), Maryland’s statewide health information exchange, has selected Get Real Health’s patient engagement platform to help improve secure access to COVID-19 test results for patients in Maryland.

The first phase of the project will be rolled out across the state of Maryland and is expected to be available in November 2020. Included in the first phase is the proven Get Real Health patient engagement platform that will enable patients to access their COVID-19 test results quickly and easily in a secure environment. Available in both a web-based portal and native mobile application, individuals will have access to their COVID-19 test results anytime, anywhere for added efficiency and convenience.

This patient engagement solution will seamlessly integrate with the Health Information Exchange (HIE) currently in place as part of the CRISP suite of tools, facilitating the secure exchange of data from disparate providers and organizations throughout the region.

“These are unprecedented times related to protecting public health in our community due to COVID-19, and we are honored to work with the official health exchange for the state of Maryland,” said Robin Wiener, president of Get Real Health. “Helping to ease the stress of COVID-19 testing and playing a role in improving the health and safety of our fellow citizens is personal to us. As a Maryland company, we have benefited from the support of many state and local organizations over the years. Being a part of this project brings our mission full circle.”

“It is critical that patients have their COVID-19 test results as quickly as possible,” said Craig Behm, Maryland executive director of CRISP. “Although most patients will receive information directly from their physicians, those going to walk-up testing sites may need results through CRISP instead. Get Real Health’s focus on access and interoperability make them great partners in this endeavor.”

“The importance of patient involvement and empowerment in managing their care is more important than ever as we manage through this pandemic,” said Boyd Douglas, president and chief executive officer of CPSI. “We look forward to the benefits and impact that the Get Real Health patient engagement platform will have in Maryland and other states for years to come.”

About Get Real Health

Get Real Health, a member of the CPSI family of companies, combines a world of new information from patients, devices and apps with existing clinical data to help individuals and healthcare professionals engage and empower each other. By giving providers and patients the information and tools that they need to work together, we help our customers meet their ever-changing patient engagement needs. Our suite of products helps deliver value-based care, improve outcomes, activate patients, and increase patient loyalty and satisfaction, all while meeting regulatory requirements. For more information,

CNN medical analyst: I’d perform psychiatric evaluation on Trump if he were my patient

Dr. Leana Wen, a CNN medical analyst and visiting professor at George Washington University, said she would perform a psychiatric evaluation on President TrumpDonald John TrumpQuestions remain unanswered as White House casts upbeat outlook on Trump’s COVID-19 fight White House staffers get email saying to stay home if they experience coronavirus symptoms White House says ‘appropriate precautions’ were taken for Trump’s outing to see supporters MORE if he were her patient and left the hospital while still infected with the novel coronavirus “to go for a car ride.”

“If @realDonaldTrump were my patient, in unstable condition + contagious illness, & he suddenly left the hospital to go for a car ride that endangers himself & others: I’d call security to restrain him then perform a psychiatric evaluation to examine his decision-making capacity,” she tweeted on late Sunday.

 

Earlier Sunday, Trump, who was admitted to the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for treatment last week after confirming he and first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpGOP lawmaker calls on Pelosi to apologize for response to Trump contracting coronavirus White House gave New Jersey officials list of 206 people at Trump’s Thursday fundraiser events Photo of Mark Meadows rubbing his head during update on Trump’s health goes viral MORE tested positive for coronavirus, was seen riding in a motorcade and waving at supporters during a “surprise” trip around the hospital.

Trump and Secret Service agents were seen wearing masks inside the vehicle. 

Deputy White House press secretary Judd Deere said Trump “took a short, last-minute motorcade ride to wave to his supporters outside and has now returned to the Presidential Suite inside Walter Reed.”

The official added that “appropriate precautions were taken in the execution of this movement to protect the President and all those supporting it, including PPE. The movement was cleared by the medical team as safe to do.”

Deere declined to say if the president requested the move. 

The drive-by sparked criticism online from those who said the move put others who rode in the vehicle with Trump  at unnecessary risk. 

“Every single person in the vehicle during that completely unnecessary Presidential ‘drive-by’ just now has to be quarantined for 14 days,” James Phillips, an attending physician at Walter Reed. “They might get sick. They may die. For political theater. This is insanity.”

Wen previously served as president of Planned Parenthood before being removed from the organization last year due to “philosophical differences” she said she had with new board chairs “over the direction and future” of the organization. She was the first physician to head Planned Parenthood in years.

–Updated at 7:47 a.m.

Trump’s doctors grapple with competing demands from public and patient, experts said

The chief White House physician was facing heavy scrutiny over the weekend for obscuring aspects of President Donald Trump’s health after he was diagnosed with COVID-19, focusing attention on the vexing challenge he faces navigating the demands of an anxious nation and a commander-in-chief who favors rosy assessments.



a group of people standing in front of a building: Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Oct. 4, 2020.


© Jacquelyn Martin/AP
Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Oct. 4, 2020.

“When you’re in a complicated situation like this, you can only go so far,” said Dr. Benjamin Aaron, the chest surgeon who in 1981 removed the bullet from President Ronald Reagan, and said he and his colleagues “felt a sense of duty to level with the American people.

“It’s appropriate to be open, but there has to be a certain amount of implied trust” with his VIP patient,” he said.

MORE: An unusual patient, an unusual treatment: Trump and the risks of ‘VIP syndrome’


a group of people standing in front of a building: Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Oct. 4, 2020.


© Jacquelyn Martin/AP
Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Oct. 4, 2020.

The man standing at the crossroads of these competing interest now is Dr. Sean Conley, an Afghan War veteran and military physician who has addressed reporters twice over the weekend about the president’s battle with the novel coronavirus, a diagnosis he received late last week.

Conley offered conflicting statements about the president’s health status and treatment timeline, prompting a crisis of credibility emanating from the esteemed hospital’s medical staff. On Saturday, Conley said he and his staff were “extremely happy with the progress the president has made,” and described his symptoms as mild. But after the briefing concluded, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows offered a vastly more dire prognosis, calling the president’s vitals on Friday “concerning.”

MORE: Trump adviser defends campaign virus precautions despite packed events, maskless attendees

Conley attempted to clean up the diverging takes on Sunday, telling reporters that Meadows’ comments had been “misconstrued,” but acknowledged he was “trying to reflect the upbeat attitude of the team and the president, over the course of the illness, has had,” in describing the president’s status.

“I didn’t want to give any information that might steer the course of illness in another direction,” Conley said, “and in doing so, it came off that we were trying to hide something, which wasn’t necessarily true.”



a man sitting at a table using a laptop: U.S. President Donald Trump works in a conference room while receiving treatment after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S. October 3, 2020.


© White House/via Reuters
U.S. President Donald Trump works in a conference room while receiving treatment after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S. October 3, 2020.

The president’s critics have accused the White House of deliberately misleading the American people. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, of New York, issued a call on Sunday for the full details of Trump’s health status to be released, along with the names and health status of everyone who has tested positive at recent related events.

“When you don’t have full transparency, when there’s

An army of doctors. Access to an experimental drug. A special patient gets special care.

Trump’s caregivers are sparing nothing in their attempt to treat his coronavirus infection.

From his team of providers to his helicopter flight to the hospital to the experimental drug that fewer than 10 others have received outside a clinical trial, Trump has access to care available to few of the other 7.3 million people in the United States infected so far by the coronavirus. Even with symptoms that Conley appeared to describe as moderate at worst, the 74-year-old president is the VIP of VIPs in his battle against covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

“I think about it as a realist,” said Robert Wachter, professor and chair of the department of medicine at the University of California at San Francisco. “He is the president of the United States. For him to get the most vigorous therapies . . . even if we have not yet reached the point where there is enough evidence to make it available to everyone in the country, doesn’t seem off to me.”

“I think access to treatment and frequent monitoring is probably a good thing for evolving medical care of a new disease,” added John W. Mellors, chief of infectious diseases at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

VIP treatment is a feature of American medicine. Major hospitals throughout the country have private spaces for celebrities, the super-rich and the influential, patients who want to be shielded from the public and just may make a large donation if they are happy with their care. They are U.S. citizens and foreign nationals from places including Saudi Arabia, China, Canada and Mexico.

The coronavirus pandemic, in contrast, has featured memorable scenes of community hospitals from New York to Texas nearly overwhelmed by desperately sick people, of doctors and nurses working around-the-clock with insufficient equipment. At least 208,000 people in the United States have died of covid-19, according to a Washington Post analysis.

Trump has been widely criticized for his handling of the pandemic, especially in the early months, when the federal government left states to scramble for face masks, ventilators and other equipment needed by caregivers and patients. That performance is his greatest weakness in next month’s election against his Democratic rival, former vice president Joe Biden, polls show.

In addition to his suite at the military hospital in Bethesda, Md., the most notable advantage Trump enjoys is access to an experimental antibody treatment that has been given to fewer than 10 people under the “compassionate use” program that the president’s doctors employed to obtain the drug from its manufacturer, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. About 2,000 others have received the drug or a placebo because they are enrolled in the company’s clinical trial.

“The VIP treatment around antibodies is ethically troubling and yet there are many, many other things we do to support the president that are different from what you and I get, and we live with it every day,” Wachter said.

The drug has been touted as a potential game-changer by prominent scientists — a way

An unusual patient, an unusual treatment: Trump and the risks of ‘VIP syndrome’

With unlimited access to resources and the nation’s finest physicians by his side, President Donald Trump may reasonably expect to be treated with a higher level of care and attention than the average American infected with COVID-19.

Experts say that may not be a good thing.

On Friday, after the White House revealed that the president had been given an unapproved but promising antibody cocktail, medical professionals warned that his special treatment, known colloquially in medical circles as “VIP syndrome,” may have adverse effects.

“When a patient is high profile, there’s a temptation to break away from the standard medical care that you would give to any other patient — and sometimes to the disadvantage to the patient, the VIP,” said Dr. Mark Siegel, a Yale academic and physician.

PHOTO: Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Oct. 3, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus.

Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Oct. 3, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus.

Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Donald Trump, briefs reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Oct. 3, 2020. Trump was admitted to the hospital after contracting the coronavirus.

Dr. Sean Conley, the president’s personal physician, said at a Saturday press briefing that Trump is “receiving all the standard of care and beyond.”

“We are maximizing all aspects of his care, attacking this virus with a multi-pronged approach,” he said. “I didn’t want to hold anything back. If there was any possibility that it would add value to his care and expedite his return, I wanted to take it.”

Shortly before Marine One swept the president off to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, on Friday, the White House announced that the president had been administered a dose of an unproven antibody therapy developed by drugmaker Regeneron.

Regeneron’s treatment has not been authorized by the Food and Drug Administration. The company said in a statement that the president was granted approval to use it as part of a “compassionate use” clause, which clears the way for legal access to an experimental drug outside of a clinical trial.

Experts said there’s evidence the antibody cocktail may improve the president’s condition, but it carries the risk of producing unexpected side effects.