Trump, moving to show strength, aims for Monday release

BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — President Donald Trump hoped for a Monday discharge from the military hospital where he is being treated for COVID-19, a day after he briefly ventured out while contagious to salute cheering supporters by motorcade — an outing that disregarded precautions meant to contain the virus that has killed more than 209,000 Americans.

The scale of the outbreak within the White House itself was still being uncovered as press secretary Kayleigh McEnany announced she tested positive for the virus Monday morning and was entering quarantine. Trump’s doctors have not released an update on his condition since Sunday morning.

White House officials said Trump was anxious to be released after three nights at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where doctors revealed on Sunday that his blood oxygen level had dropped suddenly twice in recent days and that they gave him a steroid typically only recommended for the very sick. Still, the doctors said Trump’s health was improving and he could be discharged as early as Monday to continue the remainder of his treatment at the White House.

Trump “is ready to get back to a normal work schedule” and was optimistic about a Monday release, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows told Fox News. He said a determination would be made after further evaluation by his medical team later Monday.

Less than one month before Election Day, Trump was eager to project strength despite his illness. The still-infectious president surprised supporters who had gathered outside the hospital, riding by Sunday in a black SUV with the windows rolled up. Secret Service agents inside the vehicle could be seen in masks and other protective gear.

The move capped a weekend of contradictions that fueled confusion about Trump’s health, which has imperiled the leadership of the U.S. government and upended the final stages of the presidential campaign. While Trump’s physician offered a rosy prognosis on his condition, his briefings lacked basic information, including the findings of lung scans, or were quickly muddled by more serious assessments of the president’s health by other officials.

In a short video released by the White House on Sunday, Trump insisted he understood the gravity of the moment. But his actions moments later, by leaving the hospital and sitting inside the SUV with others, suggested otherwise.

McEnany spoke briefly with reporters Sunday evening without wearing a mask, but said that no members of the White House press corps spent enough time around her to be considered close contacts.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the best evidence is that people with mild to moderate COVID-19 aren’t contagious about 10 days after symptom onset. People with more severe disease likely are contagious no longer than 20 days after symptom onset, according to those guidelines. That means isolation — whether in the hospital or at home — is supposed to last for at least 10 days.

Joe Biden’s campaign, meanwhile, said the Democratic presidential nominee again tested negative for coronavirus

Wellington virtual Zumba class keeps students moving, hoping

Kristina Webb
 
| Palm Beach Post

WELLINGTON — Elyse Beras’ relationship with Zumba did not start out well.

The Wellington resident’s first try at the fitness class, which combines aerobics and Latin dance, fell flat. The instructor just wasn’t engaging.

Then Beras found Jamie Tizol. 

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The effervescent Zumba instructor drew Beras into the high-energy workouts — something Tizol continues to do with new students, now in a virtual format using the Zoom video conferencing platform, prompted by the coronavirus pandemic.

“She makes every individual feel, ‘You can do it with me, and I’m going to show you how,’” Beras said.

Tizol has earned praise from her students at the Wellington Community Center, with people heaping acclaim on the 43-year-old instructor for her engaging personality and skill as an instructor.

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But something else about Tizol’s virtual classes is getting the attention of Wellington residents. 

When Tizol moved from her physical classroom at the community center to a virtual classroom using the Zoom video conferencing platform, it opened up an opportunity for her dedicated students, like Beras, to share the classes with friends and family around the country.

It’s helped them connect, stay in touch and see each other in a fun setting each week, Beras said.

“She could get a person that’s dying up to dance,” she said.

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Tizol joined Wellington’s slate of community center instructors in 2016. She teaches four virtual classes: Zumba, Zumba Gold for people age 55 and older, Zumba Gold chair for people who may not be as mobile, and Zumba Toning, which incorporates a small amount of weight.

Moving from in-person classes to Zoom was “seamless” for Tizol, said Jenifer Brito, Wellington’s Community Services specialist, who organizes and directs senior programs. 

“We’re so lucky to have her,” Brito said. 

With 20 to 35 people per class, Tizol still finds a way to make each class personal for her students, Brito said. 

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“She really loves what she does, and it really shines through,” she said.

Wellington has received a flood of calls from grateful students over the past few weeks, Brito said.

“She’s bringing family members together during this time,” she said. “That’s special.”

For Tizol, each class is a gift. 

“I look forward to it every day, to see their smiling faces,” she said.

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Tizol began teaching Zumba about 15 years ago while living in Virginia. Growing up, she had a passion for dancing and music, and when a friend introduced her to the lively workouts, she fell in love. 

When she and her family moved from Virginia to Wellington six years ago, she had to start fresh with a new group of students. 

It was fate that she met Mary Ann

‘Execute with speed and adjust on the fly’: how this fitness studio changed its fate by moving online | Xero: Resilient business

After the arrival of a global pandemic, Ben Lucas discovered the power of reinvention. “It saved our business,” he says.

Lucas is a co-owner of Flow Athletic, a yoga studio and gym in the Sydney suburb of Paddington. Like many in the Australian fitness industry, he has had to transform the way he does business in 2020 – but he’s met each challenge head-on.

Ben Lucas with co-owner Kate Kendall.



In March, as the Covid-19 situation began to escalate, Flow prepared for the inevitable and loaned out 120 spin bikes to members so they could train at home. Then, once fitness studios were ordered to shut, it was quick to act: within 24 hours, Flow had moved its class schedule online. Lucas set up four Facebook groups – dedicated to yoga, strength, spin and pilates – so staff could live stream multiple classes at a time. Personal training appointments were conducted over Zoom or FaceTime. Even Flow After Dark, its signature “yoga silent disco”, became a live streamed event.

This quick thinking kept Flow in business. But even better, the move online has allowed Flow to open up to an entirely new customer base, finding clients in cities it would otherwise never have been able to reach.

“We had people in London, Singapore, Hong Kong and LA live stream their yoga – that was a market we never thought of,” Lucas says. “We had a mum doing it with her daughters in London and New York at the same time. That’s pretty cool.”

Isolation spin.



Tuning in from London.



Flow isn’t the only business that’s found success by taking a chance to rethink the way it does things: Xero’s Rebuilding Australia report found that of the 1000 small businesses surveyed in early June, 39% had found new customer markets during Covid.

The move online also made Flow think differently about how it operated its business. “For the personal training side of things, we had never thought to Zoom or FaceTime our sessions,” Lucas says. But it’s worked.

The shift to live streams has been a hit with clients. An online survey that Flow sent its customers found that 86% planned to continue with online classes even after the pandemic is over. Some like the convenience; others intend to use it when they’re away from home or on holidays.

Ben live stream.



“That was one of the other gifts of what happened – it forced a lot of our clients to go online because we didn’t have the in-person offering,” Lucas says.

“Previously they might not have done it because they thought they wouldn’t enjoy it. But they found they actually really liked it.”

While eased restrictions in Sydney have allowed Flow to reopen the doors to its Paddington studio, it’s not only continuing to run live-streamed classes, but is investing in a dedicated online platform to expand what it can do on the web. Currently, Flow runs 15 Facebook classes a week, while Lucas personally hosts one Zoom session a week. From 1 October, Flow will launch its on-demand service that will offer more than