Man City sweating on Kevin De Bruyne’s fitness for Arsenal clash after being sent back with injury from Belgium duty

KEVIN DE BRUYNE has been sent back to Manchester City after his injury scare at Wembley on Sunday.

The Belgium international looked in some discomfort when he was subbed late in the 2-1 defeat to England.

Kevin De Bruyne faces a race against time to be fit to face Arsenal on Saturday

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Kevin De Bruyne faces a race against time to be fit to face Arsenal on SaturdayCredit: Getty Images – Getty

He spent Monday with the rest of Roberto Martinez’s squad in London – and was even pictured out on his bike with team-mates.

However it was decided he would not be ready to play against Iceland tomorrow night – so will not board the flight to Reykjavik today.

Instead he will return to the Etihad where City will be keen to see if there are any major issues with a game against Arsenal looming on Saturday.

A tweet from the Belgium FA read: “Kevin De Bruyne has returned to his club. He couldn’t be fit enough to play against Iceland.”

It will be a worry for Pep Guardiola who has already seen the first few weeks of City’s season wrecked by illness and injuries.

Martinez insisted after the game at Wembley that there was no major concern for his midfielder – but did say he was not feeling quite right.

The former Everton boss said: “I would not say that Kevin is injured. He said he felt something.

“It is too early to know what he has, but he did not feel a hundred per cent. It was rather a precautionary change.”

The Manchester City star was subbed off late on in the defeat to England at Wembley

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The Manchester City star was subbed off late on in the defeat to England at WembleyCredit: AP:Associated Press

Ironically De Bruyne, 29, warned at the weekend that many players will get injured this season due to the heavy workload and lack of a proper summer break.

Guardiola is hoping to have at least one forward back to face Arsenal with Gabriel Jesus and Sergio Aguero making good progress in their recoveries.

Raheem Sterling pulled out of the international games due to a minor hamstring problem – which City do not believe is a major issue.

Pep Guardiola told by Richard Keys to bring in Sam Allardyce to sort out Man City defence after 1-1 draw vs Leeds

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Novak Djokovic gives fitness update after Carreno Busta accuses him of feigning injury concerns



Novak Djokovic


Novak Djokovic

Pablo Carreno Busta made a startling accusation on Wednesday when he alleged that top seed Novak DJokovic was feigning injury concerns during their quarter-final meetings at French Open 2020. 17th seed Carreno Busta took the first set 6-4 only to go down in 4 sets and crash out of the competition.

Novak Djokovic seemingly wasn’t in top gear in the first set as he had headed into the match with a strap on his neck and his movements were restricted. Carreno Busta though was ruthless as he came up with spotless service games while Djokovic was struggling with it, getting only 40 percent of his first serves in.

After losing the first set, Djokovic received treatment on-court as his trainer worked on his upper-left arm. Djokovic was feeling uncomfortable but after the on-court treatment, the Serb was able to manage a strong comeback and fend off the threat from the 17th-seed Spaniard.

Djokovic needed 3 hours and 10 minutes to beat Carreno Busta 4-6, 6-2, 6-3, 6-4 but the Spaniard wasn’t happy with the treatment Djokovic received. Notably, Carreno Busta had beaten Djokovic when the Serb was defaulted during his Round of 16 match at US Open — the only loss for the World No. 1 in the ongoing season.

“Each time he is in trouble he usually does it, that means to say that he was in trouble, that he wasn’t comfortable and that I was playing at a high level and was causing him to doubt himself. Every time a match gets complicated he asks for medical assistance. He has been doing this for a long time. I already knew that. I knew it would happen at the US Open, I knew it would happen here and I know it will keep on happening,” Carreno Busta said.

“I don’t know if it’s something chronic in his shoulder or just mental, but he didn’t put me off.”

Don’t want to get into it too much: Djokovic

Meanwhile, Djokovic said he did not feel great before coming into the match but he is feeling okay after overcoming his neck and shoulder issues during the quarter-final. Djokovic will face 5th seed Stefanos Tsitsipas in the semi-final as he bids to win his 18th Grand Slam at Roland Garros this year.

“I definitely didn’t feel great coming onto the court today, a few things happened in the warm-up. I had some neck issues and some shoulder issues. I don’t really want to get too much into it. I’m feeling okay, I’m still in the tournament so I don’t want to reveal too much. As the match went on, I felt better, and didn’t feel as much pain,” Djokovic said.

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Acute Kidney Injury in COVID-19 Varies, But It Is Deadly

Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center.

The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) among patients hospitalized for COVID-19 in China was significantly lower than for similar patients in the United States, a new retrospective study from Wuhan indicates.

However, mortality among patients who do develop AKI following COVID-19 infection — especially if they require dialysis — is much higher in both regions than it is for patients who do not sustain kidney damage, this and other studies consistently show.

In an editorial accompanying the Wuhan study, published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Edward Siew, MD, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and Bethany Birkelo, DO, Veterans Affairs, Nashville, Tennessee, say the Chinese researchers should “be commended” for their contribution to the literature. “The extraction and analysis of data under challenging conditions with several clinical and logistical unknowns are laudable,” they write.

Yet, they add, “Although the findings add important data to the existing knowledge on COVID-19–associated AKI, important knowledge gaps remain.”

“Among these are the need to better understand the factors underpinning individual differences in the risk for AKI. The incidence of AKI in this study was one fifth of that observed in more recent studies of hospitalized patients from Western countries,” they comment.

Do Age, Presence of Comorbidities Explain the Differences?

Digging down, it would appear that age and the presence of comorbidities explain a large part of the variance in AKI incidence rates.

In the group of 1392 COVID-19–infected patients admitted to a tertiary teaching hospital in Wuhan between January 18 and February 28, 2020, only 7% developed AKI during their hospital stay. That said, 72% of patients who developed AKI died in hospital. 

In contrast, among hospitalized patients who did not develop AKI, the mortality rate was only 14%, note Yichun Cheng, MD, of Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China, and colleagues in their article published online September 22 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

“Acute kidney injury is a common, serious complication in critically ill patients that is associated with increased mortality, longer hospital stay, and higher medical costs,” the Chinese investigators point out.

Meanwhile, US researchers have updated a prior analysis in which the incidence of AKI was 36.6% among approximately 5500 patients admitted to 13 New York hospitals between March 1 and April 5, 2020, as reported by Medscape Medical News.

At the time of publication, 40% of these patients were still in hospital, “so we didn’t know what happened to them,” second author of the new paper, Jamie Hirsch, MD, told Medscape Medical News.

The incidence of AKI of 39.9% in the larger cohort of 9657 hospitalized patients is similar to the earlier figure. The updated analysis was published online September 19 by Jia H. Ng, MD, MSCE, of the Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Great Neck, New York City, and colleagues in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases