Trump boasts of Covid-19 immunity at first rally since diagnosis

President Donald Trump boasted about his Covid-19 immunity as he held his first rally since his diagnosis.

Trump staged a vigorous return to the campaign trail Monday night as he walked to the podium in Sanford, Fla., without a mask, throwing campaign merchandise to the crowd. Just hours before he stepped on stage, Trump’s physician announced the president was no longer infectious after testing negative for consecutive days.

To prove his medical team’s point, Trump emphasized his good health to an audience where numerous maskless people could be spotted among the dense crowd: “It does give you a good feeling when you can beat something and now they say you’re immune,” he said at the hourlong rally.

“I feel so powerful,” he said. “I’ll walk into that audience. I’ll walk in there, I’ll kiss everyone in that audience. I’ll kiss the guys and the beautiful women.”

As Trump acknowledged the uncertainty surrounding the length of his immunity, he accused unspecified people of “reducing” the immunity period to make the virus seem more severe than it actually is. The uncertainty about the length (and strength) of immunity, however, is caused by the lack of information about the virus, which has been infecting humans for less than a year. Experts have only recently documented cases of people becoming reinfected.

The president also pointed out that medical professionals have a better grasp of the virus now than they did six months ago, and said that life would go back to normal — even as health experts warn that the United States could face 200,000 more deaths by 2021. And as he thanked Americans for staying resilient, the crowd chanted, “We love you.”

“I have such respect for the people of this country the way they’ve handled it,” he said. “It’s been an incredible love-fest together.”

And with his promise for normalcy, Trump emphasized that “the cure cannot be worse than the problem itself” as he praised Florida and Gov. Ron DeSantis, who was in the crowd, for opening up businesses and tourism. However, he failed to note that Florida now has the third-largest number of cases out of all of the U.S. states, with 5,570 new confirmed cases on Sunday.

As he pushed for the opening of the economy, he claimed that Democratic nominee Joe Biden would seek a “draconian unscientific lockdown” that would delay recovery for the state.

“When you’re the president, you can’t lock yourself in a basement and say, ‘I’m not gonna bother with the world,’” Trump said. “And it’s risky, but you’ve got to get out.”

In a speech filled with many of his most familiar applause and attack lines, Trump also boasted about the size of his crowd as he mocked Biden for his smaller gatherings.

Anthony Fauci, however, on Monday expressed his wariness about holding large political rallies during a pandemic.

“Put aside the political implications the rally has,” Fauci said on CNN. “Purely for public health, we know that’s asking for trouble when you

Trump, downplaying risk, says he’s ready to ‘kiss everyone’ at his first campaign trail rally since COVID-19 diagnosis

President Trump in his return to the campaign trail in Florida on Monday evening boasted he has recovered from COVID-19 and is impervious to the disease that has killed more than 210,000 Americans.

The president, who tested positive on Oct. 1, also indicated he is unconcerned about being contagious and told the audience gathered at Orlando Sanford International Airport that he would be happy to engage in some close contact. 

“One thing with me, the nice part, I went through it, now they say I’m immune. … I feel so powerful,” Trump said. “I’ll walk in there, I’ll kiss everyone in that audience. I’ll kiss the guys, and the beautiful women, and the — everybody. I’ll just give you a big fat kiss.”

Trump spoke for about an hour. While his remarks were short by the standards of his past rallies, which are often about 80 minutes long, it was far longer than any of the brief videos he released while recovering from the virus or his first live speech, which took place at the White House on Saturday and lasted less than 2 minutes. 

The president’s return to the campaign trail came shortly after the White House medical team announced that he tested negative “on consecutive days.” Trump’s return to public events came exactly 10 days after the White House said his symptoms first appeared, which is the period of isolation recommended by the Centers for Disease Control.

Trump, who was treated with steroids and experimental drugs, became ill after his campaign and the White House hosted a series of events that ignored masks and social distancing measures designed to stop the spread of the virus. Over a dozen people linked to those gatherings also tested positive, including senior members of the president’s campaign team and White House staff.

The White House has declined to reveal precisely how many staffers have fallen ill. Trump’s team has also repeatedly refused to say when he last tested negative prior to his diagnosis, raising the possibility that the testing regimen supposedly in place at the White House was not followed and also making it impossible to say whether the president traveled to events while contagious. 

Even after the cluster of cases at the White House, Trump’s Florida rally still didn’t include standard measures designed to minimize risks of coronavirus spread. Guests were packed together and many did not wear masks. 

On stage, Trump, as he has for months, criticized lockdowns and quarantine measures as detrimental to the economy. He encouraged people to ignore them if they choose.

“The cure cannot be worse than the problem itself,” Trump said of the lockdowns.“If you want to stay, stay. Relax. Stay. But, if you want to get out there, get out.”



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Trump at a campaign rally in Orlando, Fla. (John Raoux/AP)


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President Trump at a campaign rally in Orlando, Fla. (John Raoux/AP)

The president also suggested keeping distance from others was never an option for him.   

Video: President Trump: White House doctors said I can’t spread the virus anymore

Trump hosts first public event since COVID-19 diagnosis, says virus will ‘disappear’ with ‘science, medicine’

President Trump on Saturday hosted somewhere between 300 and 400 people on the South Lawn of the White House, marking his first public event since he was hospitalized after contracting COVID-19 last week. It’s been just two weeks since a crowd gathered in the Rose Garden for Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court nomination, which experts believe may have been the catalyst for a coronavirus outbreak that affected both the Trump administration and Republican senators.

Trump was scheduled to speak Saturday for about 30 minutes, but wound up only utilizing 18, an unusual instance of efficiency for the president, who is known for going on tangents that drift far beyond the scope of his planned marks. His voice reportedly sounded “a touch hoarse,” but he showed no outward signs of illness and said he was “feeling great,” The Associated Press reports.

During his speech, Trump said the coronavirus “is going to disappear” largely thanks to “science, medicine,” and “the American spirit.” That’s a familiar line for the president, although this time the optimism appeared based in his belief that newly-developed coronavirus therapies, rather than wishful thinking, would lead the charge.

The event was not billed as a campaign rally, but the president’s rhetoric suggested otherwise. Read more at Axios.

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Study: New bedside test means faster diagnosis, treatment of COVID-19

Oct. 8 (UPI) — A rapid, bedside test for COVID-19 delivers results in less than two hours, meaning that appropriate treatment can be initiated earlier for those already hospitalized because of their symptoms, according to a study published Thursday by The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

The standard COVID-19 test uses polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, technology, which amplifies small samples of DNA in order to identify the presence of virus in samples taken from an infected person’s nose or throat.

The PCR test requires samples to be sent to a centralized lab within the hospital for processing, typically takes more than 20 hours to produce results, the researchers said.

The enhanced speed of the bedside, or “point-of-care” tests, also means patients infected with the new coronavirus can be isolated earlier, reducing the risk for transmission to other patients and healthcare workers.

“Our findings are the first to suggest the clinical benefits of molecular point-of-care COVID-19 testing in hospitals, demonstrating reduced delays, bed moves and time in assessment areas, which all lead to better infection control,” study co-author Dr. Tristan William Clark, of Southampton General Hospital in England, said in a statement.

“We believe that [these] molecular [tests] should be urgently integrated … to reduce coronavirus transmission within hospitals to prevent the next wave of the pandemic overwhelming health services around the world,” Clark said.

Since the start of the global pandemic in March, healthcare systems worldwide have relied on PCR testing of patient samples in centralized hospital laboratories, an approach that is accurate, but also lengthy and resource intensive, according to Clark and his colleagues.

The longer time it takes to generate results with PCR testing means that patients often wait in mixed assessment rooms to be admitted to the correct COVID-19 or non-COVID ward, increasing the possibility of transmission, the researchers said.

However, with point-of-care tests, nasal and throat swab samples are collected and placed into small cartridges for analysis. Unlike PCR tests, which require specially trained lab personnel, the bedside tests can be performed by healthcare workers in the emergency room or other assessment area, they said.

For this study, Clark and his colleagues evaluated the QIA-stat-Dx point-of-care testing platform, manufactured by Dutch firm Qiagen, in 1,054 adults with COVID-19 symptoms being assessed in the acute medical unit and emergency department of Southampton General Hospital between March 20 and April 29.

Nose and throat swabs were taken from all patients and tested for COVID-19 infection, with 499 patients evaluated using the QIA-stat-Dx, while the rest were assessed using only PCR testing. All test results were confirmed using the standard PCR approach as well, the researchers said.

Among those tested with QIA-stat-Dx, 197, or 39%, were found to be positive for COVID-19, while 155, or 28%, of those evaluated by only PCR were positive for the virus, the data showed.

The point-of-care test produced results in roughly 1.7 hours on average, while PCR evaluation took approximately 21.3 hours per patient, according to the researchers.

After testing, patients were transferred to

Trump Says Coronavirus Diagnosis A ‘Blessing From God’, Shares COVID-19 Treatment He Received

KEY POINTS

  • Trump called his coronavirus diagnosis a ‘blessing from God’
  • The president shared a five-minute clip where he touted his Regeneron treatment regimen
  • He also said he wants to make the treatment available for free to the general public

President Donald Trump on Wednesday uploaded a video on his Twitter account where he called his recent coronavirus diagnosis a ‘blessing from God’ and touted the benefits of an experimental drug treatment he received. 

In the nearly five-minute clip, the president — who spoke from the White House Rose Garden — praised his treatment regiment, including the antibody cocktail made by Regeneron, for helping him “feel great.”

“For me, I walked in, I didn’t feel good. A short 24 hours later I was feeling great. I wanted to get out of the hospital,” Trump said. “And that’s what I want for everybody. I want everybody to be given the same treatment as your president, because I feel great. I feel, like, perfect.”

“I think this was a blessing from God that I caught it. This was a blessing in disguise,” he added.

Trump claimed he told his doctors to give him the Regeneron treatment. The president also said he is now convinced that his treatment regimen should be made available for free to the broader public. It is unclear how he planned to make the cost of the drugs free for thousands of patients, The Hill reported.  

Regeneron, a New York-based biotech company, made the drug REGN-COV2 that is intended to mimic the human body’s immune system and provide it with molecules to fight off the novel coronavirus. 

According to USA Today, REGN-COV2 is currently being tested in people who contracted COVID-19, including those who have been diagnosed with the virus, are symptomatic, but not hospitalized. The drug has yet to receive approval for use in the U.S. or other countries. 

The video is the latest attempt from the White House to project optimism after numerous reports alleged that Trump’s coronavirus condition may be severe after he received the antiviral drug remdesivir and the steroid dexamethasone. 

The president covered other talking points in the clip, including his belief that a coronavirus vaccine will soon be ready. He also said he pushed health agencies to speed up their approval processes and claimed China will “pay a big price” for the virus originating there. 

No mask, no worries, says US President Donald Trump No mask, no worries, says US President Donald Trump Photo: AFP / NICHOLAS KAMM

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Trump works from Oval Office six days after COVID-19 diagnosis

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump and Biden’s plans would both add to the debt, analysis finds Trump says he will back specific relief measures hours after halting talks Trump lashes out at FDA over vaccine guidelines MORE worked from the Oval Office on Wednesday, less than a week after his coronavirus diagnosis, as his doctor said he was feeling “great” and experiencing no symptoms.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that coronavirus patients self-isolate for at least 10 days after the onset of their symptoms. Trump tested positive for COVID-19 on Thursday and spent three days at Walter Reed National Military Medical Facility receiving care over the weekend, returning to the White House on Monday evening. 

A White House spokesman said Trump is being briefed on stimulus talks and Hurricane Delta. A Marine stood outside the entrance to the West Wing, a sign that the president is at work inside.

Trump tweeted Wednesday that he had spoken with Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) and Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) about the hurricane, and shared local Federal Emergency Management Agency guidance for individuals to prepare for the storm.

“Please heed the directions of your State and Local Officials. We are working with them very closely — please be prepared, be careful, and be safe!” Trump tweeted.

 

In working from the Oval Office, Trump may be increasing the risk that others in the West Wing catch the virus. It was not clear who was briefing Trump on Wednesday afternoon. 

A growing number of individuals working in the White House or connected to Trump’s campaign or who otherwise have recently attended White House events have tested positive for the virus over the past week.  

White House chief of staff Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsFormer GOP chair Michael Steele calls Trump ‘the superspreader’ in the White House Murkowski after Trump halts talks: Congress must move on virus package Overnight Health Care: Trump calls off coronavirus relief talks MORE said earlier Wednesday that Trump had wanted to work from the Oval Office on Tuesday — one day after he returned from the hospital — and the White House was instituting safety protocols in order to ensure that it is safe. Trump has otherwise been working out of the residence, where he and first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpDemocratic Rep. Carbajal tests positive for COVID-19 Biden: ‘We shouldn’t have’ second debate if Trump still has COVID-19 Overnight Defense: Top military officers quarantine after positive COVID case | Distracted pilot,

Olivia Newton-John tearfully talks breast cancer diagnosis: ‘I knew immediately something was wrong’

Olivia Newton-John opened up about the first time she was diagnosed with breast cancer in a tearful video shared on Monday.

The “A Little More Love” singer was first diagnosed with the disease in 1992, had a secret battle with cancer in 2013 and her most recent diagnosis in 2017.

Newton-John, 72, currently has stage four metastatic breast cancer.

JOHN TRAVOLTA PRAISES ‘GREASE’ CO-STAR OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN AMID HER CANCER BATTLE: ‘I’M VERY PROUD OF HER’

The “Grease” actress announced a new foundation in her name to help other cancer survivors.

Olivia Newton-John attends 2018 G'Day USA Los Angeles Black Tie Gala 

Olivia Newton-John attends 2018 G’Day USA Los Angeles Black Tie Gala 
(Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)

“I am probably one of those people who’s living beyond cancer, living beyond probably what people expected to happen,” the Australian singer said in her video.

She then got tearful recalling her 1992 diagnosis and said, “I knew immediately something was wrong.

“I had a mammogram. The mammogram was benign and I had a needle biopsy that was also benign,” Newton-John said. But she persisted and got a surgical biopsy, which then led to her breast cancer diagnosis.

OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN GIVES HEALTH UPDATE ON BREAST CANCER DIAGNOSIS

The singer added: “I don’t say this to scare women, but you have to just trust your instincts.

“All this was overwhelming. It was a feeling of dread, terror, the unknown,” she said of that time.

Newton-John then added she chose to be strong moving forward for the sake of her daughter, Chloe Lattanzi.

“I made the decision that I was going to be okay. I had to believe I was going to be okay, that my daughter was the most important thing in my life and I would be okay for her,” the Grammy winner said.

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She also discussed her combination of cancer treatments ranging from chemotherapy, meditation, acupuncture, massage, and plant medicine to help her manage her pain.

Newton-John has long been an advocate for medicinal marijuana.

“Plant medicine has played an amazing role in my life. I have seen the incredible beauty of the plants and their healing abilities,” the actress said. “I know it sounds strange but if I hadn’t had that experience, I wouldn’t be sitting here talking to you about kinder therapies.”

She added: “Your body wants to heal itself. That’s why I’m excited to start this foundation.”

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The Olivia Newton-John foundation notes on their website, “We will fund the discovery of kinder therapies and advocate for more effective ways to prevent, treat and cure all cancers.”

In January, the actress gave a positive health update and revealed her tumors shrunk in size.

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Families of COVID-19 victims slam president’s downplaying of his diagnosis

Hours before he was released from a hospital stay for his coronavirus diagnosis Monday, President Trump tweeted his thoughts on the pandemic that’s killed over 210,000 Americans, saying, “Don’t be afraid.”



President Donald Trump boards Marine One to return to the White House after receiving treatments for COVID-19 at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md.


© Evan Vucci/AP
President Donald Trump boards Marine One to return to the White House after receiving treatments for COVID-19 at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md.

On Twitter, supporters of the president praised his strength and hailed his message, calling him “Our beloved President” and “BEST PRESIDENT EVER!”

But for scores of families who’ve lost loved ones to the disease, as well as first responders and other advocates, the response was far different. Many of them slammed the president’s cavalier sentiment and warned that it could make the situation worse.

Brian Walter, a New York City transit worker who lost his father to the virus, told ABC News in a statement that Trump’s advice to people not to fear the coronavirus “hurts.”

MORE: Trump returning to White House after saying he ‘learned’ about COVID-19 by having it

“It makes me worry for all the families who will still experience the loss of a loved one because our president refuses to take this pandemic seriously,” he said.



a close up of a green field: Empty chairs who represent a fraction of the more than 200,000 lives lost due to COVID-19, are seen during the National COVID-19 Remembrance, at The Ellipse outside the South side of the White House, Oct. 4, 2020, in Washington.


© Jose Luis Magana/AP
Empty chairs who represent a fraction of the more than 200,000 lives lost due to COVID-19, are seen during the National COVID-19 Remembrance, at The Ellipse outside the South side of the White House, Oct. 4, 2020, in Washington.

Walter is a member of the survivor network and advocacy group COVID Survivors for Change, which has been documenting the toll the pandemic has left on millions of Americans. On Sunday, the group installed 20,000 empty chairs on the lawn across from the White House to symbolize the nation’s COVID-19 deaths.

Chris Kocher, executive director of COVID Survivors for Change, said in a statement that he was taken aback by Trump’s tweet, given that he had the best health care and treatment in the world — a luxury that most coronavirus patients don’t have.

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Trump’s doctors told the press that he was given several medications including an antibody cocktail, remdesivir and steroids.

“For the long haulers living with symptoms of COVID-19 for months on end, this virus is terrifying. Trump doesn’t care, and he still doesn’t get what families are going through,” Kocher said in a statement.

Susan R. Bailey, the president of the American Medical Association, urged Americans to keep heeding warnings from doctors and health experts.

“We know vigilance is the best response to the COVID-19 pandemic because this virus doesn’t feed on fear; it feeds on complacency,” she said in a statement.

Liza Billings, a New York City nurse who lost her brother to the pandemic and is also member of COVID Survivors for Change, criticized Trump’s take

‘A slap in the face’: Families of COVID-19 victims slam president’s downplaying of his diagnosis

Advocates warn the president’s cavalier attitude could make the pandemic worse.

On Twitter, supporters of the president praised his strength and hailed his message, calling him “Our beloved President” and “BEST PRESIDENT EVER!”

But for scores of families who’ve lost loved ones to the disease, as well as first responders and other advocates, the response was far different. Many of them slammed the president’s cavalier sentiment and warned that it could make the situation worse.

Brian Walter, a New York City transit worker who lost his father to the virus, told ABC News in a statement that Trump’s advice to people not to fear the coronavirus “hurts.”

“It makes me worry for all the families who will still experience the loss of a loved one because our president refuses to take this pandemic seriously,” he said.

PHOTO: Empty chairs who represent a fraction of the more than 200,000 lives lost due to COVID-19, are seen during the National COVID-19 Remembrance, at The Ellipse outside the South side of the White House, Oct. 4, 2020, in Washington.

Empty chairs who represent a fraction of the more than 200,000 lives lost due to COVID-19, are seen during the National COVID-19 Remembrance, at The Ellipse outside the South side of the White House, Oct. 4, 2020, in Washington.

Empty chairs who represent a fraction of the more than 200,000 lives lost due to COVID-19, are seen during the National COVID-19 Remembrance, at The Ellipse outside the South side of the White House, Oct. 4, 2020, in Washington.

Walter is a member of the survivor network and advocacy group COVID Survivors for Change, which has been documenting the toll the pandemic has left on millions of Americans. On Sunday, the group installed 20,000 empty chairs on the lawn across from the White House to symbolize the nation’s COVID-19 deaths.

Chris Kocher, executive director of COVID Survivors for Change, said in a statement that he was taken aback by Trump’s tweet, given that he had the best health care and treatment in the world — a luxury that most coronavirus patients don’t have.

Trump’s doctors told the press that he was given several medications including an antibody cocktail, remdesivir and steroids.

“For the long haulers living with symptoms of COVID-19 for months on end, this virus is terrifying. Trump doesn’t care, and he still doesn’t get what families are going through,” Kocher said in a statement.

Susan R. Bailey, the president of the American Medical Association, urged Americans to keep heeding warnings from doctors and health experts.

“We know vigilance is the best response to the COVID-19 pandemic because this virus doesn’t feed on fear; it feeds on complacency,” she said in a statement.

Liza Billings, a New York City nurse who lost her brother to the pandemic and is also member of COVID Survivors for Change, criticized Trump’s take on the virus.

“I watched as medical teams fought like hell to save patients from COVID-19.

Biden Says He Will Debate Trump Following President’s COVID-19 Diagnosis if Experts Say It’s Safe | America 2020

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden on Monday indicated he would participate in the next scheduled debate with President Donald Trump if experts determined it was safe.

“I’ll do whatever the experts say is appropriate to do,” Biden told reporters before he boarded his campaign plane.

He said he would “listen to the science” to make the decision, adding that “we should be very cautious.”

The former vice president and his wife, Jill Biden, are scheduled to deliver remarks in Miami later Monday. The pair has so far tested negative for the virus following the news that Trump and several people in his inner circle were diagnosed with COVID-19.

Photos: Donald Trump, the Past 2 Weeks

trump covid

Biden declined to comment on Trump’s excursion from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Sunday to wave at supporters from inside a car. He also did not want to comment on Trump’s health, saying he would “leave that to the doctors.”

The next presidential debate is scheduled for Oct. 15.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that isolation and other precautions for most people can generally be discontinued 10 days after symptom onset if they have been fever-free for 24 hours without the help of medication and other symptoms are improving. But if a patient was admitted to a hospital and needed oxygen, they might need to isolate longer, possibly up to 20 days after symptoms first appeared.

Trump used supplemental oxygen on Friday, according to his medical team, and was later admitted to Walter Reed medical center.

But Trump could stop isolation earlier than the criteria indicates if he receives two negative tests results in a row at least 24 hours apart from each other, according to CDC guidance.

The latest in Trump’s inner circle to test positive for the virus was White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Monday.

The president’s medical team indicated on Sunday that Trump could be released from the medical center to return to the White House as early as Monday. The team noted two incidents of drops in Trump’s oxygen levels since he tested positive. The most recent drop, which happened Saturday morning, prompted doctors to put the president on dexamethasone, a widely available steroid that has been shown to reduce death in severe COVID-19 cases.

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