U.S. tops 215K COVID-19 deaths; Dr. Anthony Fauci says ‘we’re in a bad place’

Oct. 13 (UPI) — The national death toll from COVID-19 has surpassed 215,000, according to updated figures Tuesday from research at Johns Hopkins University.

The data showed about 215,100 coronavirus deaths and an addition of about 41,700 cases nationwide on Monday. The figure is a decrease from about 44,600 cases a day earlier, which followed four straight days over 50,000.

There were an additional 300 deaths on Monday, according to the data, which also showed a total of 7.8 million cases nationwide since the start of the pandemic.

The data came on the same day researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University said U.S. deaths during the first five months of the health crisis may have been undercounted by as many as 75,000.

Over the past week, new cases nationwide have averaged almost 50,000 — a substantial increase over the previous week.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, told CNBC Monday the United States is in a “bad place” with the colder months approaching.

“We have got to turn this around,” he said.

“We have got to convince Americans that public health measures do not mean shutting the country down,” he added. “It’s actually an avenue to keeping the country open.”

Later Monday, Johnson & Johnson announced it had paused a late-stage human trial for its potential vaccine due to an adverse reaction in one of the volunteers.

Johnson & Johnson executive Joseph Wolk said although it’s a setback, the pause in the trial should reassure Americans that the company is following strict scientific and safety standards.

“We’re letting safety protocol follow proper procedure here,” he said, noting that adverse events in large trials are not uncommon.

In Colorado, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock warned that a surge in cases has brought the city to a “fork in the road,” as its seven-day average reached a record high.

The city, he said, could impose new restrictions if the trends don’t change quickly.

“That means our capacity in restaurants, retail business, event spaces and personal services, among others, get cut in half,” Hancock said. “When so many business right now are struggling just to stay open, that would mean absolute devastation to those businesses.”

In Montana, the state’s most populous county imposed new restrictions as hospital officials warned healthcare facilities are becoming overwhelmed.

Yellowstone County health officer John Felton said places of worship will be capped at 50% of regular capacity and no more than 25 people will be allowed to gather in any one place, indoors or outdoors. The county has a positivity rate of 62 per 100,000 people, among the highest in the nation.

At 54 positive cases per 100,000, Montana’s rate is the third-highest in the United States and trails only North and South Dakota, according to the Brown School of Public Health.

Billings Clinic CEO Scott Ellner has told business leaders the surge is “putting a tremendous strain” on the healthcare system.

“While we remain open and we are making adjustments, our health

Hurricane Irma caused over 400 senior deaths in Florida, study says

The aftereffects of 2017’s Hurricane Irma appear to have killed more than 400 senior residents of Florida nursing homes, a new university study shows.

Researchers at the University of South Florida and Brown University concluded that 433 additional patients died within 90 days of the September 2017 storm, compared to the same period in 2015, when there were no hurricanes.

Their study examined health data for 62,000 patients at 640 Florida nursing homes obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, according to the Tampa Bay Times. The study was recently released.

HURRICANE DELTA’S DEATH TOLL AT 4 AS LOUISIANA OFFICIALS STRESS GENERATOR SAFETY AFTER DEADLY FIRE

The study was prompted by the heat-related deaths of 12 residents at a Broward County nursing home. Authorities said those deaths were caused when the storm disabled the central air conditioning and the staff failed to move patients to a nearby hospital.

The study was prompted by the heat-related deaths of 12 residents at a Broward County nursing home.

The study was prompted by the heat-related deaths of 12 residents at a Broward County nursing home.
(John McCall/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, File)

An administrator and three nurses who worked at the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills have been charged with failing to prevent the deaths.

The researchers found that long-term nursing home residents suffered not only increased mortality rates after Irma, but more hospitalizations.

‘BUBBLE CURTAIN’ IS THE NEWEST CRAZY HURRICANE-KILLING IDEA

“Nursing homes need to really pay attention to these people when they’re in the process of reacting to a hurricane,” said co-author Lindsay Peterson, a research assistant professor of aging studies at USF.

In this geocolor image captured by GOES-16  and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hurricane Irma, a potentially catastrophic category 5 hurricane, moves westward, Tuesday morning, Sept. 5, 2017, in the Atlantic Ocean toward the Leeward Islands.

In this geocolor image captured by GOES-16  and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hurricane Irma, a potentially catastrophic category 5 hurricane, moves westward, Tuesday morning, Sept. 5, 2017, in the Atlantic Ocean toward the Leeward Islands.
(NOAA via AP)

Brian Lee, director of Families for Better Care, a nonprofit that advocates for better services at long-term care facilities, said the study shows that nursing homes need to do a better job preparing for hurricanes.

“This is an extremely vulnerable population, and nursing homes and other facilities need to do a better job of hardening their facilities to protect our loved ones,” Lee said.

After Irma, Florida required nursing homes and assisted-living facilities to install generators to keep residents cool in case of a storm. But the laws need to be tougher, Lee said.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE WEATHER COVERAGE FROM FOX NEWS

Nursing homes need generators that can allow cooling of residents in their rooms, not spot coolers that were used at Hollywood Hills. That required moving residents into large spaces to keep them cool. Fewer than 100 of the state’s long-term care facilities had temporary generators during Irma, the Times reported.

“We need to make sure that facilities can withstand these storms and not worry about transferring residents around and exposing them to potential transfer trauma,” Lee said.

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No Additional Deaths; 46 New Cases

WASHINGTON, DC — D.C Department of Health confirmed 46 new positive cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday. That’s up from the 38 reported on Monday. This brings the District’s total number of positive cases to date to 16,068.

D.C. Health reported no additional deaths due to COVID-19 on Tuesday. The total number of deaths in the District stands at 637.

According to D.C. Health, 443,081 coronavirus tests have been administered in the District, 233,450 residents have been tested, and 12,583 have been cleared from isolation.

The District currently has 50 intensive care unit beds available out of 345 total intensive care unit beds. There are currently 169 in-use ventilators out of a total of 440 available. Also, there are 25 COVID-19-positive ICU patients.

Get the latest updates on the new coronavirus in D.C. as they happen. Sign up for free news alerts and a newsletter in your Patch town.

Globally, more than 37.9 million people have been infected by COVID-19, and over 1 million people have died, Johns Hopkins University reported Tuesday morning. In the United States, more than 7.7 million people have been infected and over 214,000 people have died from COVID-19.

Total of Positive COVID-19 Cases By Age and Gender

(D.C. Health)
(D.C. Health)

Total of Positive COVID-19 Cases By Ward

(D.C. Health)
(D.C. Health)

Total COVID-19 Deaths By Ward

D.C. Health
D.C. Health

Total of Positive COVID-19 Cases By Race

(D.C. Health)
(D.C. Health)

Total of Positive COVID-19 Deaths By Race

(D.C. Health)
(D.C. Health)

District residents should take the following actions to help prevent the spread of COVID-19:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

  • Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. An alcohol-based hand sanitizer can be used if soap and water are not available.

  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.

  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

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This article originally appeared on the Washington DC Patch

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The Latest: Israel surpasses 2,000 deaths from coronavirus

JERUSALEM — Israel has now recorded more than 2,000 deaths from the coronavirus as the country remains under lockdown for a fourth week to quell the outbreak.

The Health Ministry reported Monday night that the country had surpassed 2,000 deaths. It reported five more fatalities on Tuesday, raising the toll to 2,021.

Israel — which has confirmed more than 295,000 cases — had garnered praise earlier this year for its swift imposition of travel restrictions to limit the pandemic’s spread, but after lifting the first nationwide lockdown in May, new cases quickly increased.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government imposed a second blanket lockdown on Sept. 18 as the infection rate per capita grew to one of the highest in the world.

Israel’s infection rate is gradually decreasing, and the Cabinet is deliberating how and when the government will start to lift restrictions.

———

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Second COVID-19 vaccine trial paused over unexplained illness

— Takeaways: Coronavirus at center of Supreme Court hearings

— Defiant Trump defends virus record at his first post-COVID rally

— As the pandemic presses on, waves of grief follow its path

———

— Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

———

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

ISLAMABAD — With Pakistan’s coronavirus caseload inching upward, the government has increased lockdowns across the country, targeting markets and neighborhoods with increasing numbers.

At a meeting of top government officials from across the country Tuesday, Planning and Development Minister Asad Umar said 3,497 so-called “smart” lockdowns have been imposed in districts across the country of 220 million people.

Pakistan has recorded 319,848 cases, including 531 new ones reported Tuesday.

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NEW DELHI — India has registered 55,342 new coronavirus cases, its lowest single-day tally since mid-August.

The Health Ministry raised India’s confirmed total to more than 7.17 million cases on Tuesday but said the country was showing a trend of declining daily cases over the last five weeks.

The ministry also reported 706 deaths in the past 24 hours, raising the toll to 109,856.

According to data shared by the Health Ministry, the average number of daily cases from Sept. 9-15 was 92,830. The average has steadily declined since then, falling to under 73,000 per day over the last week.

Meanwhile, India’s testing rate has remained constant, with almost 1.1. million tests being carried out every day.

India, a country of nearly 1.4 billion people, is second in the world in total cases, behind only the U.S., which has confirmed over 7.8 million infections.

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BEIJING — Authorities in the eastern Chinese port city of Qingdao say they have completed coronavirus tests on more than 3 million people following the country’s first reported local outbreak of the virus in nearly two months.

The city’s health department said Tuesday that no new positive cases had been found among the more than 1.1 million test results returned thus far. The city said it had a total of 12 cases, six with symptoms

Israel surpasses 2,000 deaths from coronavirus

JERUSALEM — Israel has now recorded more than 2,000 deaths from the coronavirus as the country remains under lockdown for a fourth week to quell the outbreak.

The Health Ministry reported Monday night that the country had surpassed 2,000 deaths. It reported five more fatalities on Tuesday, raising the toll to 2,021.

Israel — which has confirmed more than 295,000 cases — had garnered praise earlier this year for its swift imposition of travel restrictions to limit the pandemic’s spread, but after lifting the first nationwide lockdown in May, new cases quickly increased.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government imposed a second blanket lockdown on Sept. 18 as the infection rate per capita grew to one of the highest in the world.

Israel’s infection rate is gradually decreasing, and the Cabinet is deliberating how and when the government will start to lift restrictions.


___

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Second COVID-19 vaccine trial paused over unexplained illness

— Takeaways: Coronavirus at center of Supreme Court hearings

— Defiant Trump defends virus record at his first post-COVID rally

— As the pandemic presses on, waves of grief follow its path

___

— Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

___

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

ISLAMABAD — With Pakistan’s coronavirus caseload inching upward, the government has increased lockdowns across the country, targeting markets and neighborhoods with increasing numbers.

At a meeting of top government officials from across the country Tuesday, Planning and Development Minister Asad Umar said 3,497 so-called “smart” lockdowns have been imposed in districts across the country of 220 million people.

Pakistan has recorded 319,848 cases, including 531 new ones reported Tuesday.

___

NEW DELHI — India has registered 55,342 new coronavirus cases, its lowest single-day tally since mid-August.

The Health Ministry raised India’s confirmed total to more than 7.17 million cases on Tuesday but said the country was showing a trend of declining daily cases over the last five weeks.

The ministry also reported 706 deaths in the past 24 hours, raising the toll to 109,856.

According to data shared by the Health Ministry, the average number of daily cases from Sept. 9-15 was 92,830. The average has steadily declined since then, falling to under 73,000 per day over the last week.

Meanwhile, India’s testing rate has remained constant, with almost 1.1. million tests being carried out every day.

India, a country of nearly 1.4 billion people, is second in the world in total cases, behind only the U.S., which has confirmed over 7.8 million infections.

___

BEIJING — Authorities in the eastern Chinese port city of Qingdao say they have completed coronavirus tests on more than 3 million people following the country’s first reported local outbreak of the virus in nearly two months.

The city’s health department said Tuesday that no new positive cases had been found among the more than 1.1 million test results returned thus far. The city said it had a total of 12 cases, six with symptoms

The pandemic’s true toll: Deaths are up by 27%, study finds | Coronavirus

The coronavirus pandemic in Louisiana has marked some of the deadliest months on record for the state. From March 1 to August 1, about 24,000 people died, a 27% increase compared to the same five-month span in at least the last six years, according to a new study analyzing deaths during the pandemic.

Those cases are what scientists call excess deaths — the gap between reported deaths and expected deaths. The loss of life reflects the true toll of the virus, which impacts far greater numbers than those who die after a COVID-19 infection. 

In the past seven months, Louisiana hospitals have had to meet countless challenges as the coronavirus strained their staff and hospital capacity.

Louisiana’s increase is higher than the U.S. average, which was 20%, according to the analysis, published in the peer-reviewed Journal of the American Medical Association. Of all states, Louisiana ranked fourth for its per capita rate of excess deaths, behind only New York, New Jersey and Massachusetts.

According to the study, three-fourths of Louisiana’s excess deaths are attributed to coronavirus. But about 25%, or 1,232 people, are unaccounted for by COVID-19 infection.

“For every three people known to have died of COVID-19 in Louisiana, another person died due to some aspect of the pandemic,” said Dr. Stephen Woolf, study author and epidemiologist at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Within that 25% there are two groups of people. Some of those people were infected, but their death certificate didn’t mention it — possibly because they died at home or it wasn’t confirmed in a laboratory before or after death.

The second group is made up of people who were not infected but died because of the disruption to health care the pandemic caused.

“There are people dying of heart disease, strokes, diabetes and so forth because of interruptions in their care,” said Woolf.

In Louisiana, deaths from Alzheimer’s disease and dementia doubled. There were 64 such deaths in the first week of 2020, but 127 in the week ending April 11 during the peak of the virus. Diabetes deaths also increased significantly, Woolf said.

Those interruptions are driven both by fear of seeking care during the pandemic and a strapped medical system, he said.

On her last day of consciousness, Misty Luminais Babin held onto hope. “I choose life,” the 38-year-old told her sister, husband and doctor fr…

“My sense is that these deaths that are caused by disruptions are occurring more during surges when the system is being overwhelmed,” said Woolf. “In calmer times, people come out for appointments and the health system has the capacity to deal with them. When hospitals are getting overrun and emergency room patients are in hallways because there’s no room for them, that’s an environment where we worry about these kinds of deaths occurring more often.”

The findings of the report match up with what the state has reported and what doctors are seeing in hospitals, said Dr. Rebekah Gee, CEO of LSU Healthcare Services Division and former Secretary of

Montgomery County’s COVID-related deaths now 143

Montgomery County logged its 143rd COVID-19-related death Monday.

The death is a Spring woman in her 60s who died at the hospital. The woman had other health conditions in addition to testing positive for COVID-19.

The county’s total number of cases is now 12,365. Of those total cases, 1,914 are active, an increase of 177, according to the Montgomery County Public Health District.

Total hospitalizations, both county and noncounty residents, increased by 15 to 71 with 14 of those patients in ICU.

The reason for the difference in the new cases and active cases is the Montgomery County Public Health District is continuing to process cases that were reported to the Department of State Health Services directly by health care providers and entered into the National Electronic Disease Surveillance System.

Online registration is still available for COVID-19 testing in Montgomery County.


To get a voucher, go to mchd-tx.org or mcphd-tx.org and click on the “need to be tested” link. Fill out the information. A voucher will be emailed. Once you have the voucher, make an appointment at your choice of testing centers and get tested.

The MCHD/MCPHD COVID-19 Call Center is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Call 936-523-3916.

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Maryland adds 504 new coronavirus cases, five new deaths; positivity rate down slightly

Maryland added 504 confirmed cases of coronavirus Monday, as well as five new deaths associated with COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus.

These additions bring the state’s total to 131,861 confirmed infections and 3,859 fatalities since officials started tracking the pandemic’s spread in the state in March. Through Sunday’s count, the state had the 29th-most cases per capita and the 16th-most deaths per capita in the U.S., according to the Johns Hopkins University’s coronavirus resource center.

There are currently 384 patients who are hospitalized with the virus in Maryland down from 393 on Sunday. Ninety-three patients are in intensive care units, an increase of three from the day before. There are 291 people currently requiring acute care, dropping slightly from 303 on Sunday.

The seven-day average testing positivity rate currently stands at 2.76% in Maryland. That’s down by 0.07% from 2.83% Sunday. Hopkins, which tracks this measure in a different way than state officials, had the rate at 5.65% as of Sunday.

Maryland determines positivity by looking at the number of tests conducted, while Hopkins looks at the number of people tested. That means Hopkins counts individuals who are tested multiple times, regardless of results, only once in its data.

The World Health Organization has recommended that governments see 14 consecutive days with positivity rates below 5% before beginning to draw back restrictions related to the pandemic. Though Maryland has been reporting a rate below that measure for about three months, it began its reopening process before reaching the WHO’s suggested benchmark.

According to the Hopkins tracker, Maryland had performed the 32nd-most tests per capita in the nation as of Sunday, with over 28,000 tests per 100,000 people. The state was reporting a testing volume of over 2.9 million as of Monday.

As of Monday, 476 have died from the virus in Baltimore City, with an additional 17 probable deaths from COVID-19. Montgomery County, the most populated county in the state, has seen the most deaths from the virus, with 815 fatalities and 40 probable fatalities as of Monday.

Prince George’s County, the second most populated county in the state, followed Montgomery close behind with 814 deaths and 23 probable deaths. It has experienced the highest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the state, with 30,762 as of Monday.

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©2020 The Baltimore Sun

Visit The Baltimore Sun at www.baltimoresun.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Expect 20,000 more coronavirus deaths by the end of the month, former CDC director says

Another 20,000 Covid-19 deaths by the end of the month are “inevitable,” according to a former director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.



a man standing in front of a building: Medical staff wearing full PPE push a stretcher with a deceased patient to a car outside of the Covid-19 intensive care unit at the United Memorial Medical Center on June 30, 2020 in Houston, Texas. Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations have spiked since Texas reopened, pushing intensive-care wards to full capacity and sparking concerns about a surge in fatalities as the virus spreads. (Photo by Go Nakamura/Getty Images)


© Go Nakamura/Getty Images
Medical staff wearing full PPE push a stretcher with a deceased patient to a car outside of the Covid-19 intensive care unit at the United Memorial Medical Center on June 30, 2020 in Houston, Texas. Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations have spiked since Texas reopened, pushing intensive-care wards to full capacity and sparking concerns about a surge in fatalities as the virus spreads. (Photo by Go Nakamura/Getty Images)

The estimate is based on the number of infections “that have already occurred,” Dr. Tom Frieden said Saturday, during CNN’s “Coronavirus: Facts and Fears” town hall.

The United States reported 57,420 new coronavirus cases on Friday, the highest number of new daily cases since August.

“Anytime we ignore, minimize or underestimate this virus, we do so at our peril and the peril of people whose lives depend on us,” Frieden said.

More than 7.7 million people have been infected with the virus in the US and 214,377 have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

By February, the coronavirus death toll in the US could double to about 400,000, a model from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington School of Medicine projected. Daily deaths will peak at about 2,300 in mid-January, the model predicted.

Projections aren’t set in stone, however, and what the public does can have a big impact, another former CDC director, Dr. Richard Besser, said.

New Covid-19 cases continue to grow across the country, though. Florida health officials reported 5,570 new cases of Covid-19 on Sunday after there was no case or death update on Saturday, according to the Florida Department of Health.

There were also 178 Floridian deaths reported on Sunday, bring that total to 15,364, according to the data.

In Montana, it took almost five months from the beginning of the pandemic for the state to reach 5,000 confirmed coronavirus cases. But in just the past 11 days the state has reported a further 5,000 cases as the virus continues to spread throughout the country.

Impacts could be much greater than officials think

Officials are tracking coronavirus infections and deaths, but Frieden said those numbers may be too small.

The true number of coronavirus deaths in the United States is well over a quarter million, Frieden said Saturday.

Part of the problem in determining the true impact is how deaths are listed on death certificates, especially for older patients who are more likely to have other health problems along with a coronavirus infection. Often the other health condition is listed as the cause of death, he said.

“If you die from cancer, and you also have diabetes, you still died from cancer,” Frieden explained. “If you died from Covid, and you also had diabetes, you died from Covid.”

The number of infections is likely closer to 40 million people, he

L.A. County reports 971 new coronavirus cases, 3 deaths

LOS ANGELES, CA - APRIL 11: A couple in face masks walk down Cesar E. Chavez Blvd on Saturday morning in Los Angeles. Life around Cesar E. Chavez Blvd. and Soto St. has slow down as California officials extended stay-at-home orders into May and residents entered Easter weekend with unprecedented limits on their movements. Most of the people are adhering to the orders by mayor to wear masks while out running errands. Los Angeles, CA. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)
A couple walk down Cesar E. Chavez Boulevard near downtown Los Angeles. (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles County public health officials on Sunday reported 971 new coronavirus cases and three related deaths.

The number of new cases and deaths is usually lower on Sundays and Mondays because of laboratory reporting delays.

The county now has logged a total of 282,135 cases of the virus, and 6,771 people have died.

Officials continued to report encouraging signs of progress in the county’s fight against the virus.

There were 693 people with a confirmed case of COVID-19 in county hospitals as of Saturday, down from more than 2,200 at the peak of the crisis in mid-July.

L.A. County last week saw a slight uptick in the number of new coronavirus cases reported each day, on Wednesday reporting its highest daily count of infections since Aug. 22, but experts said it’s too early to say whether it represents the start of a larger surge in infections.

Even so, the percentage of tests that came back positive for the virus each day declined slightly over the course of the week, from a seven-day average of 3.2% Monday to 3% Sunday, officials said. The positivity rate, which helps officials determine whether more new cases are being identified because of increased transmission or because more people are being tested, has hovered around 3% for several weeks, officials said. In July, about 8% of tests were coming back positive.

The positivity rate is one of several metrics officials are keeping an eye on to gauge whether transmission of the virus is increasing and weigh whether more businesses should be allowed to reopen.

The state also recently created an equity metric that establishes specific positive case rate numbers that larger counties must meet in their poorer cities and neighborhoods.

L.A. County remains in the strictest tier of the state’s four-tier reopening system — Tier 1, or purple — because it continues to report more than 7 cases per 100,000 residents each day. That means that many nonessential businesses remain closed for indoor operations.

Officials have said they plan to proceed cautiously through the stages, directing business sectors to reopen slowly and in a staggered manner to avoid a surge in new infections that could threaten to overwhelm hospitals. Most recently, casino card rooms were permitted to resume outdoor operations Monday and indoor shopping malls were allowed to reopen at limited capacity Wednesday.

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.

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