With athletes trained in resilience, Special Olympics helps members maintain mental and physical fitness through virtual events

Michael Heup, a Special Olympics athlete who has become a leading advocate for people with disabilities, took a deep breath as the torch approached. Heup, who started his Special Olympics career in 2001, has previously competed in soccer, basketball, tennis, snowshoe and other events.

“It’s disappointing that we can’t have large-scale events and gatherings, but we are excited to be back doing what we love,” he said. “Sports!”

His teammate behind him threw his fist in the air.

The small gathering stood in stark contrast to the boisterous crowd of thousands of athletes and law enforcement officials who have rallied around the torch lighting each year.

For 50 years, Special Olympics Maryland has fostered community for thousands of people with disabilities. Weekly trainings and annual tournaments have provided opportunities for connection and purpose, inspiring confidence among people historically subjected to social ostracism.

But when the pandemic took hold in March, Special Olympics Maryland, among other chapters nationwide, was forced to cancel practices, basketball tournaments, kayaking championships and its Summer Games.

A spring and summer void of sporting events could have been catastrophic for the nonprofit and those who rely on it. Instead, it blossomed into a vibrant virtual community buoyed by the signature fortitude of its athletes.

Over the past six months, state chapters of the Special Olympics have launched a series of virtual events that have helped maintain active routines for hundreds of thousands of people with intellectual and physical disabilities. In Maryland, Special Olympics leadership spearheaded weekly online fitness classes. And they launched walk, run and biking challenges, customizing a mobile app to track activity. They have also established online social clubs, including one that throws a virtual dance party every Saturday night.

“What we offer at Special Olympics, it is an essential part of our athletes’ social interaction,” said Jim Schmutz, president and CEO of Special Olympics Maryland. “But what you and I have experienced in the pandemic as it relates to isolation is more close to what our athletes experience historically on a daily basis. So in some cases, our athletes have adapted better than anyone.”

Monique Matthews, a 30-year-old athlete from Baltimore, has been a regular track-and-field competitor with the Special Olympics for eight years. Before the pandemic, she spent many of her days looking forward to Tuesdays and Saturdays, when she would meet with her friends to hone her running skills.

While she noticed people around her mourn the loss of their routines, Matthews simply found new ones online when the public health crisis mandated isolation.

“I just don’t look at it as a pandemic. I look at it as an opportunity to get to know myself better,” she said.

Once shy and afraid to speak her mind, Matthews has taken advantage of the comfortable virtual environment to become a leader among athletes statewide. Over the past six months, she has started leading Zoom sessions about police brutality and teaching online exercise classes that leave fellow athletes sweaty and tired.

“Right now, I feel

Diamond Dental Associates LLC, Has The Best Flemington Dentist For Oral Healthcare And Treatment Needs

Diamond Dental Associates LLC, Has The Best Flemington Dentist For Oral Healthcare And Treatment Needs

Flemington, NJ – Members of the Flemington, NJ community who wish to sport the best smiles and enjoy the advantages of top oral health can rest assured that Diamond Dental Associates LLC has the best dentists in the area to deliver these premium services at the most affordable prices. At Diamond Dental Associates LLC, the dental team focuses on providing premium quality dental care and treatment solutions to patients while delivering the best dental experience in the process.

As the leading dental clinic in the area, Diamond Dental Associates LLC has a team of dentists with over three decades of experience who are on the ground to listen to oral health complaints from patients and address the problem. At Diamond Dental Associates LLC, the team employs the use of the latest dental technologies to establish diagnosis and craft treatment plans that are most suitable for the needs of each patient.

Promising the very best dental experience, the top Flemington Dentist at the clinic said: “Here at Diamond Dental Associates LLC, we pledge to provide the finest personal service using state of the art technology for our patients, who will always be welcomed to a warm and caring environment. At Diamond Dental Associates we change lives one smile at a time. We are committed to making every interaction with our patients a positive one. We respect and acknowledge your concerns about the dental treatment you will receive. We recognize that it is difficult for highly fearful people to visit a dental office for needed treatment and we offer services that help you to feel confident that the treatment we provide is in your best interests and fits in with your preferences, lifestyle, and monetary investment.”

As a dental clinic that is constantly working on new ways to address the dental care and treatment needs of patients, Diamond Dental Associates LLC – Flemington Dentist has expanded the services offered to include general dentistry practice which focuses on improving oral health and protecting the mouth from common debilitating conditions. As part of the general dentistry services offered, patients will get to enjoy routine dental examinations, oral cancer screening, teeth cleaning, dental sealants, and more.

Added to this, the dental team at Diamond Dental Associates LLC also offers a wide range of cosmetic dental solutions aimed at improving the appearance and appeal of the teeth. As part of the cosmetic dental solutions offered, patients are welcomed into the clinic to enjoy teeth whitening services aimed at brightening the teeth and smile; cosmetic bonding used to restore decayed teeth, strengthen a weak tooth, close spaces between the teeth, and alter the shape and/or size of the tooth.

The dentists also offer dental veneers that are used to cover up blemishes, chips, cracks, and tooth discoloration; dental implants for restoration of missing or lost teeth; as well as sports mouthguards and sleep apnea treatment.

Visit Diamond Dental Associates LLC at North, 334 NJ-31 #1, Flemington, NJ 08822, or call 908-838-0004. For more information, send an email

Frenchman in right-to-die case to stop food, medicine

A terminally ill Frenchman who had planned to live stream his death on social media told AFP Saturday that he would refuse all food and medication “until the very end”.

Alain Cocq, 57, had earlier announced he was refusing all food, drink and medicine from September 5 after French President Emmanuel Macron turned down his request for euthanasia.

But he accepted palliative care after refusing food and medication for over three days because the pain had become unbearable.

“From midnight on Monday, October 12, I will stop all hydration, food and treatment apart from painkillers,” he told AFP.

“I will go right till the end.”

Cocq suffers from a rare genetic condition which causes the walls of his arteries to stick together.

He has used his plight to draw attention to the situation of terminally ill patients in France who are not allowed to die in line with their wishes.

Cocq said that when he had accepted palliative care after his abortive first attempt, the medical emergency team had to put him back on hydration and food for the pain killers to work. 

He said he had drawn a lesson from that.

“This time round, I will put my wish in writing … even if I seek medical aid at a given moment, it does not mean I wish to live.

“It would mean that I cannot bear the suffering any longer and that I seek a deep and continued sedation,” he said.

Right-to-die cases have long been an emotive issue in France.

Most polarising was the case of Vincent Lambert, who was left in a vegetative state after a traffic accident in 2008 and died in July last year after doctors removed life support following a long legal battle.

The case divided the country as well as Lambert’s own family, with his parents using every legal avenue to keep him alive but his wife and nephew insisting he must be allowed to die.

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Coronavirus pandemic and election-year politics collide, eroding trust in science

The positive development immediately became entangled in election-year politics, with President Trump repeatedly making false and exaggerated claims about the new therapeutics. He called them a cure, which they’re not. He said he was about to approve them — a premature promise given that the FDA’s career scientists are charged with reviewing the applications.

This has been the 2020 pattern: Politics has thoroughly contaminated the scientific process. The result has been an epidemic of distrust, which further undermines the nation’s already chaotic and ineffective response to the coronavirus.

The White House has repeatedly meddled with decisions by career professionals at the FDA, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other science-based agencies. Many of the nation’s leading scientists, including some of the top doctors in the administration, are deeply disturbed by the collision of politics and science and bemoan its effects on public health.

“I’ve never seen anything that closely resembles this. It’s like a pressure cooker,” Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in an interview.

Trust has been damaged by White House intrusions and the FDA’s own mistakes. Earlier this year, the agency granted emergency authorization to hydroxychloroquine, the malaria drug wrongly touted by Trump as a treatment for covid-19, then reversed course when it became clear the medication could cause dangerous complications. In August, FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn drew sharp criticism for inaccurately describing the benefits of convalescent plasma, statements for which he later apologized.

Millions of Americans have embraced some version of a conspiracy theory that imagines the pandemic as a wildly exaggerated threat, or even an outright hoax, pushed by politically motivated scientists and the mainstream media to undermine the president. This is a form of science denial that leads many people to refuse to wear masks or engage in social distancing.

Scientists, meanwhile, worry that the politicization of the regulatory process could undermine the rollout of a vaccine even if it is approved by career professionals at the FDA. This is shaping up as a communications challenge for the government: Many people will want to know who, exactly, is greenlighting a vaccine.

“If the public health professionals, if Dr. Fauci, if the doctors tell us that we should take it, I’ll be the first in line to take it. Absolutely,” Sen. Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.), the Democratic nominee for vice president, said in Wednesday’s debate with Vice President Pence. “But if Donald Trump tells us that we should take it, I’m not taking it.”

Moments later Pence said it is “unconscionable” for Harris “to undermine public confidence in a vaccine.” He added, “Stop playing politics with people’s lives.”

The scolding by Pence was remarkable given that Trump has repeatedly framed the vaccine effort in terms of the November election — including just hours before Wednesday’s vice-presidential debate, when he came close to accusing his own government’s scientists of trying to delay a vaccine.

“We’re going to have a great vaccine very, very shortly. I think we

Democrats introduce bill creating commission to rule on president’s fitness for office

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Congressman Jamie Raskin introduced a bill on Friday to form a commission that would rule on the president’s fitness for office in order to “enable Congress to help ensure effective and uninterrupted leadership” in the presidency.

This panel, called the Commission on Presidential Capacity to Discharge the Powers and Duties of Office, would be “the body and process called for in the 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution,” Pelosi and Raskin’s offices said in a statement on Thursday.

At the conference press conference announcing the bill on Friday morning, Pelosi insisted that the bill was not intended to determine President Trump’s fitness of office.

“This is not about President Trump. He will face the judgment of voters. But he shows the need to create a process for future presidents,” Pelosi said. Mr. Trump claimed in a tweet later on Friday that “Crazy Nancy Pelosi is looking at the 25th Amendment in order to replace Joe Biden with Kamala Harris,” referring to the Democratic nominees for president and vice president.

APTOPIX Virus Outbreak Congress
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington on Friday. 

J. Scott Applewhite/AP


The 25th Amendment provides the procedure for the vice president to take over the duties of president in case of his death, resignation or inability to perform his duties. The amendment says that when the vice president and a majority either of Cabinet officials “or of such other body as Congress may by law provide” determine that the president is “unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office,” then the vice president shall take over the duties of president.

“The 25th Amendment is all about the stability of the presidency and the continuity of the office,” Raskin said in the conference announcing the bill, noting that it was ratified on a bipartisan basis after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

“In the age of COVID-19, which has killed more than 210,000 Americans and now ravaged the White House staff, the wisdom of the 25th Amendment is clear,” Raskin continued, referring to the multiple White House officials who have tested positive for the virus. Raskin noted that the commission would be bipartisan, with members chosen by both Republicans and Democrats, and could only act in concert with the vice president.

Raskin said Congress could direct the commission to begin an inquiry into the president’s wellbeing, and the panel would then conduct a medical test. If the president refused the test, that would be taken into account.

Pelosi and Raskin’s introduction of the bill comes after President Trump was hospitalized over the weekend after testing positive for COVID-19, raising concerns about presidential succession. The White House said that Mr. Trump remained on the job even while he was at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, and that there were no plans for Vice President Mike Pence to assume presidential authority. Mr. Trump returned to the White House on Monday, and returned to work

Dentist Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta Explains the Field’s Most Common Area of Practice, Centered Around Preventive and Restorative Care

ATLANTA, GA / ACCESSWIRE / October 9, 2020 / Focused on preventive and restorative services intended to promote optimum oral health, general dentists make up more than two-thirds of the profession. A popular dentist based in the so-called Peach State of Georgia, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta explains more about the field.

“Often I’m asked, ‘What is general dentistry?'” saysDr. Frank Roach Atlanta, speaking from his office in the Gwinnett County city of Norcross.

According to Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta, as many as 80 percent of all qualified individuals-those using their dental degree in some fashion-in the United States are considered general dentists. “Distinct from those who are focused primarily on one area of dental practice, such as periodontics, general dentists handle an array of different services, vital to the continued oral health of their patients,” he explains.

The general dentistry field,Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta goes on to illustrate, primarily covers preventive and restorative services. “General dentists may also take care of cosmetic procedures,” adds the expert, “as well as overall health concerns, such as in the case of obstructive sleep apnea.”

For many people, the one healthcare provider that they see more than any other is their dentist. Invariably, this will be a general dentist, says Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta. “As general dentists, we are the primary providers of dental care to patients of all ages,” he points out.

Routine visits,Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta suggests, to a family dentist, are the most common occurrence in a general dentistry practice, followed by professional cleaning, and, in the presence of decay, the process of filling an affected tooth.

The majority of patients are advised, Dr. Roach says, to visit their dentist at regular intervals to keep their pearly whites in tip-top condition. “Anywhere from quarterly to once or twice per year should be the norm for a typical patient,” proposesDr. Frank Roach Atlanta, “although a quick conversation with your chosen dentist will provide a more concrete idea.”

All general dentists, Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta reports, have successfully completed four years of education at an accredited dental school. “They will also have fulfilled the requirements of their local state licensing board,” he explains, “including testing and, in some instances, continuing education.”

Proudly practicing dentistry for more than two decades, Dr. Frank Roach is based in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta metropolitan statistical area city of Norcross. Norcross, in turn, is located in Gwinnett County – a suburban county of Atlanta in the north-central portion of Georgia. Home to almost a million people, Gwinnett County is the second-most populous in the so-called Peach State after Fulton County.

In addition to general dentistry,Dr. Frank Roach Atlanta also focuses on dental implants, veneers, and teeth whitening, among a number of other services. In his spare time, Dr. Roach is a keen scuba diver, an avid tennis player, and is the proud guardian of his 100-pound canine companion, American pit bull terrier Elvis.

CONTACT:

Caroline Hunter
Web Presence, LLC
+1 7865519491

SOURCE: Dr. Frank Roach

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Regenerative Medicine Market | Increasing Prevalence of Chronic Diseases to Boost the Market Growth

The global regenerative medicine market size is poised to grow by USD 9.55 billion during 2020-2024, progressing at a CAGR of over 20% throughout the forecast period, according to the latest report by Technavio. The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment. The report also provides the market impact and new opportunities created due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Download a Free Sample of REPORT with COVID-19 Crisis and Recovery Analysis.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201009005293/en/

Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Regenerative Medicine Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire)

The increasing prevalence of various chronic diseases is one of the primary factors which will drive regenerative medicine market growth during the forecast period. The incidence of many musculoskeletal disorders and bone injuries such as arthritis, osteoporosis, and severe limb trauma injuries requiring hospitalization is also increasing. Regenerative medicine opens the possibility of overcoming previously untreatable diseases using new treatment methods like processed cells for reconstructing tissues. It has the unique capability of altering the fundamental mechanisms of disease and also helps in reducing healthcare costs by eliminating the need for long-term hospitalization or drug regimes. This is leading to the increased adoption of regenerative medicine for the treatment of chronic diseases.

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Report Highlights:

  • The major regenerative medicine market growth came from the cell and tissue-based segment. Cell therapy is used to administer living cells into an individual’s body to restore the functioning of the diseased or damaged body organ. This therapy uses somatic cells and stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells, progenitor cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells.

  • North America had the largest regenerative medicine market in 2019, and the region will offer several growth opportunities to market vendors during the forecast period. The increasing prevalence of chronic and acute diseases, the rapidly rising aging population, and high awareness about regenerative therapies will significantly influence regenerative medicine market growth in this region.

  • The global regenerative medicine market is fragmented. Allergan Plc, Amgen Inc., Hitachi Chemical Co. Ltd., Integra LifeSciences Holdings Corp., Medtronic Plc, MiMedx Group Inc., Organogenesis Holdings Inc., Smith & Nephew Plc, Takeda Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., and Zimmer Biomet Holdings Inc. are some of the major market participants. To help clients improve their market position, this regenerative medicine market forecast report provides a detailed analysis of the market leaders.

  • As the business impact of COVID-19 spreads, the global regenerative medicine market 2020-2024 is expected to have Neutral and At par growth. As the pandemic spreads in some regions and plateaus in other regions, we revaluate the impact on businesses and update our report forecasts.

Buy 1 Technavio report and get the second for 50% off. Buy 2 Technavio reports and get the third for free.

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Increasing Number of Clinical Trials

Democrats Zero In on President’s Fitness for Office as Election Looms

WASHINGTON — Speaker Nancy Pelosi, amplifying questions about President Trump’s fitness for office less than a month before the election, introduced legislation on Friday that would create a standing bipartisan group of outside experts tasked with evaluating the president’s mental and physical health and advising Congress on whether the commander in chief’s powers should be forcibly removed under the 25th Amendment.

The measure is certain to die at the end of the year, given that it would need a presidential signature to be enacted. But Democrats’ decision to promote it now — after the president’s coronavirus diagnosis and as Ms. Pelosi has suggested that his treatment might be affecting his judgment — was an unmistakable dig at the sitting president’s capacity to govern, just weeks before voters go to the polls.

“A president’s fitness for office must be determined by science and facts,” Ms. Pelosi said at a news conference on Capitol Hill, where she insisted that the bill, a version of which was introduced before Mr. Trump was hospitalized with the virus, had nothing to do with him. “This legislation applies to future presidents, but we are reminded of the necessity of action by the health of the current president.”

The measure, sponsored by Representative Jamie Raskin, Democrat of Maryland, would create a bipartisan commission of health experts, doctors and former senior executive branch officials, such as a former president, selected by top congressional leaders, to report to Congress on the president’s competence.

Mr. Trump has raged against the idea, calling Ms. Pelosi “Crazy Nancy” and accusing her of staging a coup, and on Friday suggested that Democrats had proposed the measure because they were concerned not about his competence, but about that of former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., his Democratic rival.

“Crazy Nancy Pelosi is looking at the 25th Amendment in order to replace Joe Biden with Kamala Harris,” Mr. Trump said on Twitter. “The Dems want that to happen fast because Sleepy Joe is out of it!!!”

Republicans blasted the legislation as an attempt to overturn the results of the 2016 election.

“Right here in this last three weeks before the election, I think those kinds of wild comments should be largely discounted,” Senator Mitch McConnell, the majority leader, told reporters in his home state of Kentucky.

Congress has never invoked the 25th Amendment to assemble a group like the one being proposed. The amendment was ratified in 1967, in the wake of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, to prepare the country for an immediate transfer of power because of an emergency or illness. It directs the vice president to work with a commission to determine whether the president is “unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office,” and could forcibly transfer those powers to the vice president until the president recovered.

Mr. Raskin argued on Friday that the saliency of convening such a commission had been underscored by the pandemic, and said that he wished Congress had set up the panel

How Much Toothpaste Should You Use? Dentist Goes Viral for Showing How Much You Really Need While Brushing

What’s a toothpaste commercial without a pristine toothbrush and a plump swish of toothpaste across the top of the bristles? Well, get ready to have your mind blown: The amount of toothpaste we should actually be using on our teeth is about a fraction of that—at least according to one dentist on TikTok.



Tip: You're probably using way more than what's necessary.


© Getty Images
Tip: You’re probably using way more than what’s necessary.

Dr. Gao Jye Teh, a Malaysian dentist who’s studying at King’s College London, recently went viral on TikTok for sharing some oral health advice, and has become social media’s dental hygiene star in the process. In the TikTok video, he showed viewers—all 6 million of them—what the right amount of toothpaste looks like. For people over 3 years of age, it’s the size of a single pea. (FYI,this is also written on the toothpaste packaging—you know, the stuff nobody reads.)

How Much Toothpaste Should You Use? Dentist Goes Viral for Showing How Much You Really Need

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Dr. Gao also shared his video to Instagram, writing in the caption, “Commercials are lying to you! You don’t need to use that much toothpaste.”

Dr. Gao said that using more than a pea-sized amount of toothpaste poses the greatest risk to children who haven’t yet got fully-developed adult teeth. “This is because fluoride, when ingested in large amounts, can cause a cosmetic condition known as dental fluorosis on the developing teeth,” he explained. “The cosmetic implications range from mild [discoloration] to yellow and brown stains to obvious pits in the teeth.”

Geoffrey Morris, DMD, cosmetic and restorative dentist in Boca Raton, Florida, confirmed this to Health, saying, “the recommended amount of toothpaste for adults is about the size of a pea on a soft bristle or electric toothbrush.”

As for kids under age 3, only a “smear” of toothpaste is required—about the size of a rice grain, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s to ensure they don’t accidentally swallow a lot of fluoride toothpaste, which isn’t supposed to be ingested.

RELATED: The Best Whitening Toothpaste, According to Experts

Using too little toothpaste can be just as bad as using too much, according to Dr. Gao, because your teeth won’t get the fluoride’s full protective benefits. “The problem with using too little toothpaste is you may not have enough surfactant to create the bubbles that help clean, as well as enough fluoride to protect the teeth,” Dr. Morris says.

Dr. Gao also offered a handy tip: “Once you brush your teeth, you should spit out the excess and not rinse your mouth with water. This is because the fluoride in the toothpaste takes time to act on your teeth.”

If you like to use mouthwash as part of your oral hygiene routine, Dr. Gao recommends using one that contains fluoride at a different time from brushing, as this will increase the amount of fluoride exposure and help to remineralize your teeth. “Seek advice from your dentist to decide

The Daily 202: Trump tries frantically to make up lost ground with seniors, promising free medicine and checks

Other polls released over the last week show Biden leading among voters 65 and older, including in the battlegrounds of Florida, Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. Pew’s survey was in the field from Wednesday, the day after the first presidential debate, through Monday, the day Trump checked himself out of Walter Reed after his three-night stay in the hospital. Pew’s unusually large sample size of 10,543 registered voters means smaller margins of error for subgroups, which allows for deeper analysis.

Trump and many of his top advisers see his weakness among seniors as an existential threat to his hopes for a second term, and the president is demanding that his aides use all the levers of the federal government to woo older voters who have drifted away during the final 25 days of the campaign.

The president tweeted a two-and-a-half minute video Thursday afternoon of himself speaking directly to seniors, whom he referred to as “MY FAVORITE PEOPLE IN THE WORLD.”

“I’m a senior,” the 74-year-old said to the camera. “I know you don’t know that. Nobody knows that. Maybe you don’t have to tell them, but I’m a senior.”

Trump said he was “very sick” when he went to the hospital, but the experimental antibody treatment he received helped him feel better immediately. He promised that he’s going to make sure that other seniors can also access the medicine he got by pushing the FDA to immediately authorize its emergency use. 

“They like to say ‘the vulnerable,’ but you’re the least vulnerable, but for this one thing, you are vulnerable. And so am I. But I want you to get the same care that I got,” Trump said. “You’re going to get the same medicine, you’re going to get it free, no charge, and we’re going to get it to you soon. … All free! … I do know what I’m doing. The seniors are going to be taken care of, and then everybody is going to be taken care of.”

Assuming the medication gets approved for wider use, doctors say there will not be enough doses to make it widely available and note that there are potentially significant side effects. Just as importantly, Trump cannot distribute any medicine free of charge unless he agrees to a coronavirus relief deal with Congress, something he has sent mixed messages about all week. Evan Hollander, a spokesman for the Democratic majority on the House Appropriations Committee, said Trump is lying: “Without new legislation, the Trump administration cannot make covid-19 treatment available for free.” 

About 4 in 5 of the 212,000 Americans killed by the coronavirus have been over the age of 65. This group is less antsy about getting workers back into offices or kids back into school. Many seniors have sacrificed a great deal, foregoing time with loved ones to avoid potential exposure to a virus they know is more likely to kill them.

After temporarily halting negative ads against Trump while he was hospitalized, the Biden campaign unveiled several new