Irregular periods linked to a greater risk of an early death

A team of mostly US-based researchers found that women who reported always having irregular menstrual cycles experienced higher mortality rates than women who reported very regular cycles in the same age ranges. The study took into account other potentially influential factors, such as age, weight, lifestyle, contraceptives and family medical history.

The study assessed 79,505 women with no history of cardiovascular disease, cancer or diabetes. The women reported the usual length and regularity of their menstrual cycles at three different points: between the ages of 14 to 17, 18 to 22, and 29 to 46 years. The researchers kept track of their health over a 24-year period.

“This study is a real step forward in closing the data gap that exists in women’s health. It raises many interesting research questions and areas of future study,” Dr. Jacqueline Maybin, a senior research fellow and consultant gynecologist at the University of Edinburgh’s MRC Centre for Reproductive Health, told the Science Media Centre in London.

“These data will encourage future interrogation of menstrual symptoms and pathologies as an indicator of long-term health outcomes and may provide an early opportunity to implement preventative strategies to improve women’s health across the lifespan,” said Maybin, who wasn’t involved in the research.

Irregular and long menstrual cycles have been associated with a higher risk of major chronic diseases including ovarian cancer, coronary heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and mental health problems, the study said.

Fertility apps can be 'misleading' for women, review finds

In particular, the research, which published in the BMJ medical journal Wednesday, found that women who reported that their usual cycle length was 40 days or more at ages 18 to 22 years and 29 to 46 years were more likely to die prematurely — defined as before the age of 70 — than women who reported a usual cycle length of 26 to 31 days in the same age ranges.

The links were strongest for deaths related to cardiovascular disease than for cancer or death from other causes.

The authors were from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School, Michigan State University and Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, China.

No cause for alarm

Experts said that women who experience irregular or long menstrual cycles shouldn’t be alarmed by the findings of the study. Maybin said it’s important to remember that irregular menstruation is likely a symptom, not a diagnosis.

“A specific underlying cause of irregular menstruation may increase the risk of premature death, rather than the irregular bleeding, per se. We already know that women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), a leading cause of irregular periods, have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure and cancer of the womb. It is important that women with PCOS speak to their doctor to reduce these risks,” she said.

Just say it: Yes, I'm menstruating

The study was observational and can only establish a correlation, not a causal link, between an irregular or long menstrual cycle and premature death. Other unmeasured factors could have influenced the results.

Maybin noted that the participants in

Women’s FA Cup: Manchester City check Rose Lavelle fitness before Arsenal tie

Rose Lavelle
Rose Lavelle scored in 2019’s Women’s World Cup final against the Netherlands in Lyon
Date: Thursday, 1 October Kick-off: 19:15 BST Coverage: Watch live on BBC Two, BBC iPlayer and online from 19:00

Holders Manchester City are monitoring Rose Lavelle’s improving fitness before Thursday’s Women’s FA Cup semi-final against 14-time winners Arsenal.

Whoever goes through will face Everton at Wembley on 1 November after the Toffees beat Birmingham City 3-0.

United States midfielder Lavelle has yet to play for Man City since arriving in August with a minor ankle injury.

But manager Gareth Taylor hopes to give a debut “over the next couple of games” to the 25-year-old World Cup winner.

“Rose has been training hard,” said Taylor. “What we’re trying to do with her is just make sure she’s ready.

“She’s been really keen to get back in. It’s just been a case of keeping the reins on her slightly, just before we let her go and do her thing.

“[We were] making sure that she had the adequate strength required in her leg before we started to push her through some real vigorous training.”

Arsenal, who were 4-0 winners over neighbours Tottenham in the quarter-finals on Saturday before Man City beat Leicester 2-1 on Sunday, are bidding to win their fourth game in a row.

The Gunners have scored 19 times in three games since resuming play in September after the summer hiatus.

“We’re in every tournament to win it,” said manager Joe Montemurro. “The scheduling is a little bit tricky but it is what it is and we need to make sure we’re prepared for it.

“We beat them [City] twice last year and unfortunately lost at the Academy ground but they are a very good team.

“They have recruited very well and it will be a really good indication for us of where we’re at.”

Source Article

Troubling Sleep Disorder in Athletes a Sign of CTE?

Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is surprisingly common in athletes and may signal chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) caused by brainstem tau and Lewy body pathologies, new research suggests.

CTE is a neurodegenerative disorder linked to years of repetitive head impacts from playing professional football and other contact sports.

“Repetitive head impacts may damage sleep-relevant brainstem nuclei and lead to REM sleep behavior disorder,” senior author Thor Stein, MD, PhD, neuropathologist at VA Boston Healthcare in Massachusetts, said in a webinar hosted by the Concussion Legacy Foundation.

“This is something both athletes and their doctors need to be aware of,” added Stein, who is an assistant professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at Boston University School of Medicine.

The findings were published online September 17 in Acta Neuropathologica.

Surprising Findings

In RBD, the paralysis that normally occurs during REM sleep is incomplete or absent, causing people to act out their dreams by talking, flailing their arms and legs, punching, kicking and other behaviors while asleep. 

“The disorder often comes to medical attention when there is an injury or potential for injury to the individual or the individual’s bed partner,” Stein noted.

To investigate ties between CTE and RBD, the researchers analyzed the brains of 247 deceased male athletes who played contact sports; the brains were donated to the Veterans Affairs-Boston University-Concussion Legacy Foundation (VA-BU-CLF) Brain Bank.

The athletes died at a mean age of 63 years. They all had a neuropathological diagnosis of CTE. Their relatives provided information on sleep.

Nearly one third of these athletes (n = 80, 32%) with CTE displayed symptoms characteristic of RBD when they were alive. “That really surprised us,” said Stein. “This is about 30 times more than what’s reported in the general population, where it has been estimated to be present in about 1% of people,” he noted.

In addition, there was a clear dose-response effect. Athletes with CTE and RBD had played contact sports for significantly more years than their peers without RBD (18.3 vs 15.1 years; P = .02). 

“The odds of reporting RBD symptoms increased about 4% per year of play,” first author Jason Adams, an MD/PhD student now at the University of California San Diego, said in a statement.

New Insight

The results also point to a potential cause for RBD.

Compared with athletes who had CTE and no RBD, those with CTE and RBD were four times more likely to have tau pathology within brainstem nuclei involved in REM sleep (odds ratio [OR], 3.96; 95% CI, 1.43 – 10.96; P = .008). Athletes with CTE and RBD were also more likely to have Lewy body pathology (OR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.18 – 4.72; P = .02).

“Contrary to our expectations, tau pathology in the raphe nuclei was more strongly associated with RBD than Lewy body pathology, suggesting that tau pathology is more likely to lead to sleep dysfunction in CTE,” Stein said.

Christopher John Nowinski, PhD, cofounder and CEO of the Concussion Legacy Foundation, said this study

Worried You’ll Lose Obamacare? These States Have the Cheapest Healthcare Costs



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article.

Trump’s vow of 200,000 daily COVID-19 vaccines would take years to reach all Americans

President Donald Trump boasted during this week’s debate that the military could administer 200,000 COVID-19 vaccines a day when one is ready — a feat that would still mean years before every American got a vaccine.



chart, histogram: Daily confirmed cases globally


© Good/TNS/TNS
Daily confirmed cases globally

During the debate section on the coronavirus pandemic, Trump touted his plan to distribute a future coronavirus vaccine while saying he disagrees with his administration’s health experts’ expected timeline for having one that’s widely available to the public.

“We’re going to deliver it right away,” the president said after stating he thinks one could be ready by Nov. 1. “We have the military all set up. Logistically they’re all set up. We have our military that delivers soldiers and they can do 200,000 a day.”

Trump has repeatedly contradicted public health officials about the future of a vaccine.

Dr. Robert Redfield, head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said earlier this month it would likely be next spring or summer before a vaccine is widely available. Trump later said Redfield was mistaken and that it would be available by the end of this year. Dr. Anthony Fauci, White House coronavirus adviser, has said it may be early 2021 before a vaccine is ready.



chart, line chart: Confirmed U.S. cases since March 1.


© Good/TNS/TNS
Confirmed U.S. cases since March 1.

It’s unclear what Trump intended the military’s role to be with the vaccine, as health professionals would also likely help administer the vaccines to the public.

But if Trump’s promise of 200,000 vaccines a day did come to fruition, it would still take several years to vaccinate every American.

The United States has a population of 329,877,505 as of July 2020, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. It would take roughly 1,649 days — or about 4.5 years — to vaccinate the entire population at a rate of 200,000 shots a day.

Clinical trials have suggested more than one dose of the vaccine might be necessary to be effective, McClatchy News reports, meaning it would take even longer to reach every American. If two doses are needed, the timeline could look more like nine years.

Once a vaccine is ready, the process is still far from over. The doses must be manufactured and then shipped across the country to hospitals, doctor’s offices and pharmacies before they can reach the public in coordination with the CDC and state and local health departments, The Atlantic reports.



chart, bar chart: Chart showing U.S. cases, deaths and recoveries.


© Good/TNS/TNS
Chart showing U.S. cases, deaths and recoveries.

“The COVID situation is significantly different and more complex than anything that we have had to deal with in the past,” Kris Ehresmann, infectious disease director at the Minnesota Department of Health, said, according to The Atlantic.



Robert R. Redfield wearing a suit and tie: CDC Director, Dr. Robert Redfield, testifies during a US Senate Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee hearing to examine Covid-19, focusing on an update on the federal response in Washington, D.C, on Sept. 23, 2020.


© ALEX EDELMAN/AFP/Getty Images North America/TNS
CDC Director, Dr. Robert Redfield, testifies during a US Senate Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee hearing to examine Covid-19, focusing on an update on the federal response in Washington, D.C, on Sept. 23, 2020.

After Trump’s comment during the debate, Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden pointed

Schwazze, Formerly Operating as Medicine Man Technologies, Inc., Provides Update on Acquisition Strategy

DENVER–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Sep 30, 2020–

Schwazze, formerly operating as Medicine Man Technologies Inc. (OTCQX: SHWZ) (“Schwazze ” or “the Company”), a leading vertically-integrated Colorado cannabis company, today provided an update on its acquisition strategy.

The Company announced the termination of previously named term sheet with MedPharm Holdings, a cannabis research and development operator, which expired today, September 30, 2020. As noted earlier this year, the Company had moved forward on numerous term sheets with Colorado cannabis operators but had completed limited due diligence at that time. After the rigorous review and vetting process of MedPharm, the Company was unable to reach a mutually beneficial agreement to acquire MedPharm.

Justin Dye, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Schwazze shared, “The decision to terminate the binding term sheet with MedPharm is the right step forward for Schwazze. We are committed to creating shareholder value and generating compelling investment returns and believe that by staying true to our core business strategy of building a vertically integrated platform, we will do just that. Our focus remains unchanged, as our intention is to bring together profitable cannabis operators while growing organically to create a robust, differentiated and most admired cannabis company.”

Schwazze reiterated its commitment to establishing a leading vertically integrated cannabis platform. To accomplish this, the Company has acquired Mesa Organics, a dispensary chain with four locations in Southern Colorado, Purplebee’s a leading extraction and manufacturing business and remains on track to acquire the 14 Colorado locations of Star Buds which includes 13 retail locations and a cultivation facility. The Company will continue to make decisions that uniquely position Schwazze to provide the most trusted products and experiences for consumers and the best value for shareholders. The Company remains in negotiations with the announced acquisitions Roots Rx and Canyon Cultivation.

For more information about Schwazze, please visit https://www.Schwazze.com/.

About Schwazze

Medicine Man Technologies, Inc. is now operating under its new trade name, Schwazze. Schwazze (OTCQX: SHWZ) is executing its vision to become a leading vertically integrated cannabis holding company with a portfolio consisting of top-tier licensed brands spanning cultivation, extraction, infused-product manufacturing, dispensary operations, consulting, and a nutrient line. Schwazze leadership includes Colorado cannabis leaders with proven expertise in product and business development as well as top-tier executives from Fortune 500 companies. As a leading platform for vertical integration, Schwazze is strengthening the operational efficiency of the cannabis industry in Colorado and beyond, promoting sustainable growth and increased access to capital, while delivering best-quality service and products to the end consumer. The corporate entity continues to be named Medicine Man Technologies, Inc.

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains “forward-looking statements.” Such statements may be preceded by the words “intends,” “may,” “will,” “plans,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “projects,” “predicts,” “estimates,” “aims,” “believes,” “hopes,” “potential,” or similar words. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance, are based on certain assumptions, and are subject to various known and unknown risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond the Company’s control and cannot be predicted or quantified. Consequently, actual

HPV vaccine protects against cancer, large study finds

The HPV vaccine substantially reduces a woman’s risk of developing cervical cancer, especially in women who were immunized at a younger age, a large Swedish study found.

The risk of developing cervical cancer was reduced by 88 percent in women who had been vaccinated before age 17, and by 53 percent in those vaccinated between ages 17 and 30, according to the study of nearly 1.7 million girls and women that was published in Thursday’s issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

The researchers said the study is significant because while previous research has shown that the HPV vaccine can protect against the human papillomavirus infection, genital warts and cervical precancer, solid evidence that the vaccine actually prevented invasive cervical cancer was lacking.

“This is the first study to show that HPV vaccination protects against cervical cancer on the population level,” study author Par Sparen, a professor of medical epidemiology at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, said in an email to NBC News.

“The study reassures that HPV vaccination is protective against cervical cancer, and that vaccination at young age is important for good protection,” Sparen said.

Women who were vaccinated as younger girls likely had better protection because they were immunized before they were exposed to HPV through sexual activity, the researchers said.

Human papillomaviruses are a group of viruses that cause genital warts and most cases of cervical cancer. HPV also can cause cancers of the vagina, vulva, anus, penis and throat. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that HPV causes nearly 35,000 cancer cases every year in women and men in the United States.

The study, which used nationwide registry data in Sweden, followed 1.7 million girls and women who were ages 10 to 30 between 2006 — the year the HPV vaccine was approved in that country — and 2017. Of them, 527,871 had received at least one dose of the vaccine during the study, most before age 17. Cervical cancer was diagnosed in 19 vaccinated women and 538 unvaccinated women during the study period.

The study is important because it “confirms what we know and also goes a step further,” Debbie Saslow, managing director of HPV and gynecological cancers at the American Cancer Society, said.

“We have really strong data that show that HPV vaccination prevents advanced cervical precancer, and all scientists in the world who work in cervical cancer agree that if you prevent advanced pre-cancer you prevent cancer, and that that is the accepted marker,” she said. “However, there are some critics and naysayers who say, ‘Yeah but show me that it prevents cancer,’ and this does that.”

Related: More than two-thirds of healthy Americans are teeming with wart viruses of all types, a new survey finds.

With the new paper, “we now have absolute numbers and data that say in the girls and young women who were vaccinated, they had very strong protection against cervical cancer, as compared to the women who weren’t vaccinated,” Saslow said.

The

Winnipeg dentist says teeth-grinding a sign of pandemic stress



a blurry photo of a toothbrush: A Winnipeg dentist says he's seen an influx of patients complaining of grinding their teeth -- likely due to pandemic-related stress.


© Getty Images
A Winnipeg dentist says he’s seen an influx of patients complaining of grinding their teeth — likely due to pandemic-related stress.

A Winnipeg dentist says he’s seen a significant uptick in people grinding their teeth in recent months, and there’s an obvious culprit: stress caused by COVID-19.

Dr. Ken Hamin of Reflections Dental Health Centre told 680 CJOB his office is seeing unprecedented numbers of patients coming in with the same problem.

“It’s the first time in probably 30 years that I’ve seen a trend — and the only thing I can account it towards is the stress of COVID-19,” said Hamin.

“We’ve seen a huge increase, probably three to four patients a week, coming in and saying, ‘I’ve started clenching or grinding’, or ‘I’ve got headaches.'”

Hamin said a night guard helps people reduce teeth grinding since it often occurs while we’re asleep, but sometimes, patients will be referred to a sleep study.

Read more: 11 million Canadians could experience ‘high levels of stress’ due to COVID-19: Health Canada

Winnipeg psychologist Dr. Syras Derksen told Global News that added stress during the pandemic is normal — especially when traditional holiday gatherings people look forward to — like Thanksgiving — are being advised against this year.

“I think the first thing to know is that it’s OK to grieve,” said Derksen.

“It’s important to go through a process of emotions as you realize that things are going to be different — that you’re going to have plan things different.

“You’re hoping that it’s going to be the same… but then as that realization sets in, you’re going to experience loss and you’re going to go through a series of emotions — and it’s OK to allow those to happen, and you’ll get through them.”

Source Article

This is What it’s Like to Navigate Healthcare While Black

We still have a long way to go before Black people receive the medical care they need.

This is Race and Medicine, a series dedicated to unearthing the uncomfortable and sometimes life-threatening truth about racism in healthcare. By highlighting the experiences of Black people and honoring their health journeys, we look to a future where medical racism is a thing of the past.


As a dark-skinned and sometimes sensitive little Black girl, I could never shake the feeling from my bones that my pain might be viewed as inconsequential to the very people who were supposed to provide medical care to me. It’s still something I have trouble reconciling.

With the legacy of medical racism dating back to antebellum America, it’s no surprise that Black patients seeking treatment today are still mistrustful, cautious, and protective.

As a child, I remember watching movies about how the U.S. Department of Public Health experimented on Black war veterans by withholding syphilis treatment without informed consent.

Later, I learned about white doctors testing the first gynecological instruments on enslaved Black women without anesthesia and using Black cells for groundbreaking HeLa cancer research without consent.

I sat down to talk to Black patients of all ages about their racist experiences in healthcare. Some of them wish to remain anonymous due to the stigma of openly discussing mental health, while others work in the healthcare industry and fear professional backlash.

Here are their stories.

“Maya,” 38, works as a doctor and has experienced racism among her colleagues and as a patient. Due to the professional risk of speaking out, she asked that her name be changed.

Maya’s experiences with racism in healthcare began as she looked for a job after her residency ended. Maya asked for a recommendation from the lead doctor she had worked with for 3 years and got a yes.

Once Maya got the job, which was a per diem temporary position, the woman who hired her let her know that her reference might not be ideal.

The lead doctor had said, “Well, Maya is not a go-getter.”

The woman hiring asked, “What do you mean? Is she smart? Does she know what she’s doing? Does she work hard?”

The lead doctor said yes, and Maya was hired.

The second doctor in the residency, a Black male, applied for a per diem job at the same clinic where the residency took place. The lead doctor wanted him to interview, even though she worked side by side with him for 3 years.

While she reluctantly recommended Maya and required the other Black doctor to interview, the same doctor went out of her way to create a job for the third resident, a white male medical student.

Per diem jobs are temporary, have no guaranteed hours, and benefits are rarely provided. It’s difficult to secure stable income, and many providers have to work multiple jobs just to make ends meet.

Like Maya, Black residents and doctors already exist at the margins of their field.

In

Coronavirus cases hit multiweek lows in D.C. region, but experts fear cold weather could reverse trend

But health experts cautioned that there’s no guarantee the numbers will continue to fall, as chillier October weather begins to usher outdoor activities indoors.

Taison Bell, an assistant professor of medicine specializing in infectious diseases and critical care at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, said the greater Washington region is “in a bit of a steady state” in its number of reported coronavirus cases. The region’s caseload had held steady for several weeks before starting to tick downward about 10 days ago.

He also cautioned that the arrival of cooler weather could increase the spread of the virus as people increasingly decide to congregate indoors.

Neil J. Sehgal, an assistant professor of health policy and management at the University of Maryland School of Public Health, urged residents to consider the pandemic as they make plans for the holidays. They should remember that this is “not the normal holiday season,” he said.

Sehgal said progress in some jurisdictions while battling the virus has started to slow, singling out Prince George’s County, where outbreaks have been reported at the University of Maryland. He said other college towns in the region, including Virginia’s Blacksburg and Charlottesville, also have seen caseloads rise as students go back to school.

“We haven’t controlled transmissions,” Sehgal said. “We’re still riding our first wave of the outbreak. We saw a summer dip, but we never stamped it out. There are still chains of transmission in the community.”

Short of a vaccine, Sehgal said, recent days are probably “as safe as it’s going to be” in terms of a lowered number of cases in the Washington region, also noting the likelihood of increased spread as the weather turns colder.

Still, D.C., Maryland and Virginia have made progress in battling the virus in recent days.

The seven-day rolling average of new cases in Washington’s Northern Virginia suburbs stood at 190 on Wednesday, with the region this week notching its lowest average caseloads since early August. Statewide, the number of new daily cases is the lowest since mid-July.

In D.C., the seven-day average dropped to 39 on Wednesday, the lowest in the city since early July.

Maryland’s seven-day average stood at 490 on Wednesday, up slightly in recent days but about half the number of daily cases as early August. Caseloads have held mostly steady in Montgomery and Prince George’s counties in recent weeks.

Montgomery County officials said Wednesday that they are continuing to accumulate supplies in preparation for a possible increase in coronavirus cases this fall or winter.

“We are in a lot better position than we were in the spring,” County Executive Marc Elrich (D) said at a news conference. “We made a decision in the beginning that we would accumulate enough supplies for a second surge.”

Among the supplies are 50 new ventilators that arrived this summer, officials said.

The seven-day rolling average of new cases in the county stood at 83 on Wednesday, with a test positivity rate of 2.6 percent. County health officer Travis Gayles