The Latest: India’s new virus totals still on downward trend

India has registered a single-day spike of 74,442 new coronavirus cases, driving the country’s overall tally since the pandemic began to 6.6 million

NEW DELHI — India has registered a single-day spike of 74,442 new coronavirus cases, driving the country’s overall tally since the pandemic began to 6.6 million.

The Health Ministry on Monday also reported another 903 virus deaths in the past 24 hours, taking total fatalities up to 102,685.

India has reported the second most infections globally after the United States, but its daily new infections are now on a downward trend, though still the highest in the world. The number of active virus cases in the country has also remained below 1 million for the past two weeks.

The country’s recovery rate stands at 84%, the highest in the world, with more than 5.5 million people recovered from coronavirus so far, according to the Health Ministry.

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Trump takes a brief car ride outside hospital, ignoring own COVID infection

— Biden campaign says Democratic presidential nominee tested negative for virus

— Asian shares rise as investors are optimistic about Trump’s recovery from virus

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Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

MANILA, Philippines — Grade and high school students in the Philippines have started classes at home after the pandemic forced remote-learning onto an educational system already struggling to fund schools.

The shift to distance-learning that began Monday has been a logistical nightmare for the poverty-stricken Southeast Asian country that has long lacked enough classrooms, teachers and educational equipment. Nearly 25 million students enrolled this year in mostly 47,000 public schools nationwide that would have to be replicated in homes and enlist the help of parents and guardians as co-teachers.

A majority of families, especially from poor and rural communities, opted to use government-provided digital or printed learning materials, which students would read at home with the guidance of their elders before carrying out specified activities. Most lacked computers and reliable internet connections. Teachers could answer questions by telephone.

The rest of the families preferred for their children to get lessons online or through regional radio and TV educational broadcasts.

President Rodrigo Duterte has said school classes should resume only when a COVID-19 vaccine has been made available.

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SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea has reported 73 new cases of the coronavirus, its fifth straight day of below 100. Nevertheless, officials are concerned about the threat from increased travel during a five-day holiday that ended Sunday.

The figures released by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency on Monday brought the national caseload to 24,164, including 422 deaths.

Fifty-one of the new cases were reported from the greater capital area. The newest cluster of infections in the region is an army unit in Pocheon, north of Seoul, where more than

Regenerative Medicine Market Share, Trend, Opportunity, Affect On Demand By COVID-19 Pandemic And Forecast 2020-2025

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Sep 21, 2020 (AmericaNewsHour) —
Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis
According to Verified Market Research, the Global Regenerative Medicine Market was valued at USD 19.10 Billion in 2018 and is expected to witness a growth of 22.72% from 2019-2026 and reach USD 98.10 Billion by 2026.

What is Regenerative Medicine Market?
The field of regenerative medicine comprises of abundant strategies, which mainly includes use of materials and de novo generated cells, as well as various amalgamations thereof, to substitute the lost tissue, efficiently replacing it both anatomically and functionally, or to contribute to tissue restoration. The main objective of regenerative medicine is to propagate replacement tissue or organs for patients who have sustained an injury or have had a disease that permanently damaged their tissue. National Institutes of Health defines regenerative medicine as a process of creating living, functional tissues to repair or replace tissue or organ function lost due to age, disease, damage, or congenital defects.
Regenerative Medicine can be perceived as an interdisciplinary field of research and clinical applications which mainly focuses on the repair, replacement or regeneration of cells, tissues or organs. Regenerative Medicine mainly restores impaired function resulting from any cause. Regenerative medicine has the ability to rectify or substitute tissues and organs impaired by age, disease, or trauma, as well as to normalize congenital defects.

The Final Report will cover the impact analysis of COVID-19 on this industry:

Download Sample of This Strategic Report: https://www.kennethresearch.com/sample-request-10085009

Regenerative Medicine Market Outlook
Over the last decade, stem cell biology has experienced a breakthrough in scientific and technological developments that will together have foremost and continuing influence on regenerative medicine. These entails capability to produce pluripotent stem cells from adult body cells and to cultivate mini-organs from these or from adult stem cells in well-defined culture conditions. Both methodologies offer ways to develop functional cells of human tissue that could be used for transplantation and tissue repair.
Government policies favoring regenerative medicine is one of the major reasons which has been driving the market growth. The European Union (EU) and Dutch government have prioritized regenerative medicine as an area of key strategic relevance. Apart from this, rapid increase in aged population has also boomed the market in North American region. The North Carolina Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Society is an organization in the U.S. working to improve and advance basic research, commercial development and education in the field of regenerative medicine. In the U.S., two major government agencies – NIH and CIRM – gather funds for academic translational stem cell research and regenerative medicine development. Increasing global healthcare expenditure is also expected to fuel the market.

Lack of awareness and ethical issues regarding the use of Embryonic Stem Cell for R&D is expected to hinder the market for regenerative medicine. The market growth rate is highly influenced by the adoption rate of cell therapy in the market, as it is an integral part of regenerative medicine.

Trump’s infection is part of an ominous national trend as cases rise in most states

New Jersey and Delaware have experienced rising numbers, as has Texas, which just recently endured a midsummer surge. Wisconsin, a critical swing state in the presidential election, has been hammered. It had logged record highs in case counts for 20 straight days as of Thursday, and recorded more than 17,000 new confirmed infections in a single week.

Among the latest data points in the early-autumn surge: President Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis Friday, which instantly rocked the presidential campaign, became the biggest news story on the planet and provided a reminder, if any were needed, that this pandemic shows no signs of diminishing.

Covid-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, has killed at least 207,000 people in the United States and is continuing to spread easily through many regions of the country. Infectious-disease experts had hoped transmission could be driven to low levels before cold weather arrived. That hasn’t happened, and Trump and first lady Melania Trump on Friday became part of ominous daily case counts that alarm the nation’s top doctors.

“I’m concerned we are going into the fall and ultimately the winter season, when the weather changes, [and] we are stuck at this baseline of 40,000 new infections every day,” Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in an interview before Friday’s news about the president’s infection.

On Thursday, Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers (D) delivered a radio address pleading with residents to do anything and everything to slow the startling rate of infections in the state.

“Folks, if we are going to get this virus under control, then wearing a mask is the absolute least we need you to do,” said Evers, whose own statewide mask mandate is facing a legal challenge and attacks from Republicans. “We have got to put the brakes on this pandemic to keep our friends, family, employees and co-workers, and neighbors safe.”

Places west of the Mississippi River are also struggling. Montana has set highs in case counts for 16 straight days. Kansas, Nebraska and Utah are reporting spikes in infections. And although deaths and hospitalizations have dropped in recent weeks in populous states such as California and Florida, that progress has been offset by increased transmission elsewhere.

Colder weather historically gives a boost to respiratory viruses. People spend more time indoors. Dry indoor air helps viruses remain viable and dries out nasal passages, potentially facilitating infections. People who are exposed to less sunlight can experience lowered immune responses. The coronavirus is different from the seasonal flu, but like the flu, it may show some seasonal variation.

Fauci and other infectious-disease experts say a cold-weather surge is not inevitable. They urge people to adhere to simple public health guidelines that are effective in limiting transmission — wearing a mask, maintaining physical distance, avoiding crowds, interacting with people outside rather than inside if possible, and frequent hand-washing.

But many Americans continue to not take the pandemic seriously, or to miscalculate the risk factors. “We’re starting to see

Coronavirus cases hit multiweek lows in D.C. region, but experts fear cold weather could reverse trend

But health experts cautioned that there’s no guarantee the numbers will continue to fall, as chillier October weather begins to usher outdoor activities indoors.

Taison Bell, an assistant professor of medicine specializing in infectious diseases and critical care at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, said the greater Washington region is “in a bit of a steady state” in its number of reported coronavirus cases. The region’s caseload had held steady for several weeks before starting to tick downward about 10 days ago.

He also cautioned that the arrival of cooler weather could increase the spread of the virus as people increasingly decide to congregate indoors.

Neil J. Sehgal, an assistant professor of health policy and management at the University of Maryland School of Public Health, urged residents to consider the pandemic as they make plans for the holidays. They should remember that this is “not the normal holiday season,” he said.

Sehgal said progress in some jurisdictions while battling the virus has started to slow, singling out Prince George’s County, where outbreaks have been reported at the University of Maryland. He said other college towns in the region, including Virginia’s Blacksburg and Charlottesville, also have seen caseloads rise as students go back to school.

“We haven’t controlled transmissions,” Sehgal said. “We’re still riding our first wave of the outbreak. We saw a summer dip, but we never stamped it out. There are still chains of transmission in the community.”

Short of a vaccine, Sehgal said, recent days are probably “as safe as it’s going to be” in terms of a lowered number of cases in the Washington region, also noting the likelihood of increased spread as the weather turns colder.

Still, D.C., Maryland and Virginia have made progress in battling the virus in recent days.

The seven-day rolling average of new cases in Washington’s Northern Virginia suburbs stood at 190 on Wednesday, with the region this week notching its lowest average caseloads since early August. Statewide, the number of new daily cases is the lowest since mid-July.

In D.C., the seven-day average dropped to 39 on Wednesday, the lowest in the city since early July.

Maryland’s seven-day average stood at 490 on Wednesday, up slightly in recent days but about half the number of daily cases as early August. Caseloads have held mostly steady in Montgomery and Prince George’s counties in recent weeks.

Montgomery County officials said Wednesday that they are continuing to accumulate supplies in preparation for a possible increase in coronavirus cases this fall or winter.

“We are in a lot better position than we were in the spring,” County Executive Marc Elrich (D) said at a news conference. “We made a decision in the beginning that we would accumulate enough supplies for a second surge.”

Among the supplies are 50 new ventilators that arrived this summer, officials said.

The seven-day rolling average of new cases in the county stood at 83 on Wednesday, with a test positivity rate of 2.6 percent. County health officer Travis Gayles