Coronavirus outbreak at North Carolina hair salon tied to at least 1 death: officials

At least one person has died following an outbreak of the novel coronavirus at a hair salon in North Carolina, officials announced this week.

Haywood County Health and Human Services in a news release on Tuesday announced that the person died on Oct. 1 at a local hospital.

At least one person has died following an outbreak of the novel coronavirus at a hair salon in North Carolina, officials announced this week.

At least one person has died following an outbreak of the novel coronavirus at a hair salon in North Carolina, officials announced this week.
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“The death certificate lists pneumonia due to COVID-19 infection as an underlying cause of death (the disease that initiated the events resulting in death.) The individual was elderly and had several underlying medical conditions,” officials said, noting that no other information will be released to protect the family’s privacy.

The coronavirus cluster is linked to Enchanting Hair Fashions salon in Canton, said officials, who did not reveal how many COVID-19 cases are linked to this specific cluster.

UNIFORM USE OF CORONAVIRUS FACE MASKS MAY HAVE PREVENTED OUTBREAK AT MISSOURI HAIR SALON: REPORT

“We extend our deepest sympathy to the family and loved ones. This is a sad reminder that COVID-19 is a serious and sometimes deadly illness. We urge all citizens to do their part by observing social distancing, wear masks and practice good hygiene,” said Health Director Patrick Johnson, in a statement.

It’s not clear if the stylists or salon patrons were wearing masks, though North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper mandated them in June.

The news comes after a review from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in July found that uniform mask-wearing at a hair salon in Missouri may have prevented nearly 140 clients from contracting the novel coronavirus from two hairstylists infected with COVID-19.

In May, two hairstylists at Great Clips in Springfield, Mo., tested positive for COVID-19 after seeing clients at the salon located at 1864 S. Glenstone Ave. The stylists treated some 139 clients between the two of them.

However, none of the clients were sickened with COVID-19. Experts are crediting the use of face maks, at least in part, for preventing what could have been a significant outbreak of the deadly virus.

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“Among 139 clients exposed to two symptomatic hair stylists with confirmed COVID-19 while both the stylists and the clients wore face masks, no symptomatic secondary cases were reported; among 67 clients tested for SARS-CoV-2, all test results were negative,” the report published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report reads. “Adherence to the community’s and company’s face-covering policy likely mitigated [the] spread of SARS-CoV-2.”

“The citywide ordinance and company policy might have played a role in preventing [the] spread of SARS-CoV-2 during these exposures,” the authors added in the report. “These findings support the role of source control in preventing transmission and can inform the development of public health policy during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

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Northern California evangelical school tied to ‘very large’ spike in virus cases

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A Northern California county will face greater restrictions as it grapples with a surge in coronavirus cases, many of them tied to an evangelical college where more than 120 students and staff have tested positive in the last two weeks, health officials said Tuesday.

Shasta County health officials say that an outbreak of cases among students and staff at the Bethel School of Supernatural Ministry contributed to a recent spike in COVID-19 cases that bumped the county on Tuesday into a new level of regulations on restaurants, bars, theaters and businesses.

“We have been fortunate enough to have a relatively low number of cases throughout the course of the pandemic,” said Kerri Schuette, spokeswoman for Shasta County Health and Human Services. “But we’ve had a very large increase in cases over the past two to three weeks, with 123 being associated with the Bethel School of Supernatural Ministry.”

A school spokesman declined to comment Tuesday but forwarded a statement from earlier this month saying that the school was aware its students and staff accounted for “a portion” of Shasta County’s new cases and the school was taking “swift action” to minimize further spread.

In its statement the school said it shifted to online instruction last week and canceled in-person church services for Oct. 4 and Oct. 11 that have been held outdoors on a sports field. It also asked anyone who came in contact with someone who contracted COVID-19 to quarantine at home.

“This has led to a large number of people staying home as a precaution,” the statement said, adding that staff and students have been required to wear face coverings, socially distance on campus and do daily temperature checks at the door since classes started in early September.


On its website, the school describes itself as “a ministry training center” that is not an accredited university “where our students embrace their royal identity, learn the values of the kingdom, and walk in the authority and power of the King.”

The school does not provide housing for students, saying on its website that it welcomes hundreds of international and U.S. students each year and “it is our hope that our students ‘infiltrate’ the neighborhoods of Redding.”

Shasta County recorded more than 500 new coronavirus cases in the past two weeks, pushing its total number of cases since March to 1,158.

Another cluster was traced to an assisted living facility, called the Windsor Care Facility, where 60 residents and 20 staff have tested positive for the virus since the start of the outbreak, with most of those cases occurring in the past three weeks, Schuette said.

State health officials announced Tuesday that Shasta County was getting bumped to the “red tier” of a color-coded framework for business and school reopenings. It means that restaurants, churches and other businesses can open with limits on the numbers of people allowed inside. Other nonessential businesses like bars must close.

Schuette said the county has been working closely with Bethel

Albany County says spike in COVID-19 cases likely tied to schools

ALBANY — Another county resident died from the coronavirus and the county is experiencing an increase in cases likely tied to the resumption of school, Albany County officials said Friday.

The victim, a man in his 70s with underlying health issues, is the county’s 135th known death from COVID-19. He was the 346th confirmed victim in the eight-county Capital Region.

At a morning briefing with reporters, Albany County Executive Dan McCoy said the percentage of new cases tied to outbreaks at the University at Albany are dropping but county officials warned they were seeing a slight increase in cases potentially tied to cases that have emerged since local school districts opened their doors in September..


On Sept. 17, 84 percent of the county’s new daily diagnoses were tied to the college. The following week, it dropped to 61 percent and it stood at just over 13 percent on Thursday, he said.

The surge in local coronavirus cases in August and early September was tied to social gathering among college students, a factor in the state’s decision to implement caseload limits that could ultimately lead to an end to in-person classes at the university. SUNY Oneonta took that step after a large outbreak at the very beginning of the fall semester.

“The students had to learn, right?,” McCoy said of the UAlbany situation. “Students came, got a little freedom and some of them didn’t do the right thing so that number went up. Now, I think they’re getting it.”

Still, County Health Commissioner Elizabeth Whalen said the county is starting to see “a little bit” of an uptick in cases. There were 28 new cases of the virus overnight, bringing the county’s five-day average of new daily cases to 14.8. That number was 8.4 at the start of September.

The uptick is likely tied to the resumption of school. At least 15 school districts in the eight-county area have announced positive cases since in-person learning began again this fall. Seven of them have suspended in-person learning to allow for tracing, testing and cleaning.

Additionally, on Tuesday, the county warned that it had seen a 12.5 percent increase in positive cases among 10- to 19-year-olds over the past week, compared to a 5.1 percent increase in 20- to 29-year-olds — who fueled much of the county’s cases over the summer.

“There was a concern that there would be a second surge of COVID in the fall,” Whalen said. “I don’t know whether what we’re seeing is constituting a surge but it is constituting a caution. So it’s important for people to know that COVID is still out there, there is still transmission in Albany County and people are still at risk.”

Earlier: An Albany elementary’s pre-k moves online after COVID-19 diagnosis

Third student tests positive for COVID-19 in East Greenbush

Hadley-Luzerne schools go all-virtual after sixth COVID-19 case

Queensbury closes two schools amid coronavirus cases

A number of test sites throughout the region offer testing for children, McCoy said. The state Department

Common Heartburn Meds Tied to Higher Diabetes Risk | Health News

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Often-used drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) ease heartburn symptoms, but a new study suggests they might also increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Chinese researchers drew on information from studies of more than 200,000 U.S. health care professionals and found that regular use of PPIs (such as Aciphex, Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid, Protonix) was associated with a 24% higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

The researchers also found that the longer people used the drugs, the higher their odds of diabetes.

“Regular PPI use was likely to be associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, particularly for those with prolonged use,” the authors wrote in the report published online Sept. 28 in the journal Gut.

Jinqiu Yuan, a researcher from the Sun Yat-Sen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China, led the study.

PPIs are available by prescription or over-the-counter to treat acid reflux, peptic ulcers and other digestive conditions. They are among the top 10 drugs used worldwide. Long-term use has previously been linked to a greater risk of bone fractures, kidney disease, digestive tract infections and stomach cancer.

Based on the new findings, the researchers suggested that people taking PPIs for a long time should have their blood sugar monitored for changes that might indicate developing diabetes.

It’s important to note, however, that this study was not designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship between PPIs and type 2 diabetes. It can only show a link between the two.

The researchers relied on data from three long-term studies of U.S. health professionals that began in the 1970s and 1980s. They included more than 176,000 women and nearly 29,000 men.

Participants provided information on their health and behaviors every two years. In the early 2000s, the questions expanded to include whether they had used a PPI two or more times a week.

The investigators tried to control for factors that might affect type 2 diabetes risk, including high blood pressure, weight and physical inactivity.

Besides linking regular use of PPIs to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, the researchers found that long-term use increased the odds, too. Study participants who used PPIs for up to two years had a 5% increased risk, and the risk rose 26% for those who took the drugs more than two years.

The study authors also noted that when people stopped taking these drugs, the risk of diabetes fell, and it continued to do so even more over time.

Surprisingly, the risk of diabetes associated with PPI use appeared to be highest in people with normal blood pressure and lower weight. Typically, higher weight is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

The study also found a 14% higher risk of type 2 diabetes in people taking another type of heartburn medication called H2 receptor blockers (such as Pepcid, Tagamet, Zantac).

It’s unclear exactly how taking acid-reducing medications might increase diabetes risk, the researchers said. One possible way might