Fitness tech company JAXJOX raises $10M as it gets ready to ship AI-enabled workout system



The JAXJOX InteractiveStudio exercise system. (JAXJOX Photo)


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The JAXJOX InteractiveStudio exercise system. (JAXJOX Photo)

JAXJOX, the Redmond, Wash.-based fitness technology company, has raised $10 million in a new funding round to help pay for the research and development of its signature InteractiveStudio workout equipment.

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The Series A round included investors Dowgate Capital Ltd. and entrepreneur Nigel Wray, and brings total funding to $17 million for the 3-year-old company.

JAXJOX is getting set to release its InteractiveStudio smart gym, a home fitness system that includes digitally adjustable weights, AI-enabled connected tech built into the equipment, and live and on-demand classes.

With connected tech built into individual pieces of free-weight equipment, such as a smart kettlebell, users don’t have to stand a certain distance from a screen to have form and motion tracked.

“By monitoring performance metrics and using AI, we can give users a more holistic view of their health and provide recommendations on improving their wellbeing,” founder and CEO Stephen Owusu said in a news release. “We believe that, for users, tracking power generated while lifting will become as important as tracking your heart rate while running.”

The InteractiveStudio is available for pre-order on the JAXJOX website and retails for $2,199 with a $39 monthly subscription. The system will also sell as part of an exclusive retail partnership this fall with Best Buy.

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UK’s COVID-19 Testing System Hit by Roche Supply Problems | World News

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s COVID-19 testing system, already struggling with a surge in new cases, was facing fresh disruption on Wednesday after Swiss pharmaceutical giant Roche

said problems at a new warehouse had delayed the dispatch of some products.

Roche is one of the main suppliers of diagnostic tests to Britain’s National Health Service (NHS) Test and Trace programme, which only days ago was hit by a technical glitch that delayed the reporting of 15,000 positive results.

Roche said the delay in dispatching some of its diagnostic products to the NHS was caused by unforeseen problems that arose during a switch from an old warehouse to a new UK distribution centre in September.

“We deeply regret that there has been a delay in the dispatch of some products and apologise to any of our customers who have been impacted,” Roche said in a statement.

“We are prioritising the dispatch of COVID-19 PCR and antibody tests and doing everything we can to ensure there is no impact on the supply of these to the NHS,” the company added, without specifying whether other products were affected.

Allan Wilson, president of Britain’s Institute of Biomedical Science, said Roche was a major supplier of materials such as reagents needed for routine blood tests, coagulation tests and in cancer diagnostics, as well as COVID-related materials.

“So it’s fair to say that laboratories are already running into supply problems,” Wilson said during an interview on BBC Radio 4. “We’re being very innovative in what we do, and we’re moving stuff around between laboratories, within the NHS, to make sure that all critical tests are fulfilled.”

Wilson said materials would be rationed when appropriate and the NHS was working closely with Roche to try and plug any gaps in the testing pathway.

Roche said staff at the new facility were working day and night to resolve the issue as soon as possible, and that extra staff had been recruited to help.

The timing of Roche’s problems could hardly be worse for Britain, which has seen a surge in new coronavirus infections in September and the testing system struggling to meet demand.

Wilson said a significant drop in Roche’s capacity could potentially have a major impact on NHS Test and Trace.

“The key to this, we’re not sure the duration of this, we’re hearing days or weeks. If it’s days, it will probably have minimal impact, but if it’s weeks, then yes, that could have a considerable impact on our ability to deliver tests across the whole gambit of diagnostic tests in the UK,” he said.

Trade minister Liz Truss said the problem did not appear to be causing delays in the Test and Trace programme at this point.

“There’s no evidence that those tests have been delayed,” Truss told Sky News.

However, British media reported the problem was already causing disruption, with hospital managers unsure whether expected deliveries of swabs and reagents would materialise.

The BBC quoted Tom Lewis, lead clinician for pathology at North Devon District

Wondercise Launches World-First Motion Matching Home Fitness System with Apple Watch Support

Set to revolutionize the fitness industry, Wondercise is the closest on-demand home workouts have come to scalable, virtual training with a personal touch.

Pioneering fitness technology startup Wondercise, creator of the world’s first home training system to analyze and compare user movements with those of an on-screen trainer in real-time, launches globally with Apple Watch and Garmin Wearable support.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201006005849/en/

Motion Matching technology brings the personal touch of taught classes to living rooms around the world (Photo: Business Wire)

Wondercise Motion Matching

Motion Matching – a feature missing from Apple’s Fitness+ service, enables users to maintain a focus on form, mirror trainers’ movements, and maximize workout results.

Wondercise offers unlimited access to over 50 classes at an affordable price, with sessions from trainers, including MMA champion Luis ‘Baboon’ Palomino, fitness influencer Adam Frater, and experts across a huge range of disciplines. These include Resistance Band Training, Hip Hop Dance, Kettlebell Crush, Tai Chi, Yoga and more. Thanks to its pioneering Motion Matching technology, Wondercise brings the personal touch of taught classes to living rooms around the world.

A Wonder Core company

Wondercise is built upon years of international insights into health and fitness; with its award-winning parent company, Wonder Core having achieved global acclaim with over ten million products sold.

“With the backdrop of COVID 19, a dramatic reduction in gym attendance, and an increase in time spent at home, it has become critical for everyone to have easy access to an affordable and effective fitness solution during this new normal. Wondercise’s Motion Matching technology and support for a wide range of wearables creates an ideal alternative for consumers and the broader fitness, wellbeing and health industries.”
Eric Chuang, Wondercise CEO

With the global rollout of the Wondercise service released in tandem with Apple Watch support, Wondercise is set to target the 51.4 percent of global smartwatch users who currently own an Apple Watch.*

* Counterpoint Research

About Wondercise

Established in 2015 by Wonder Core, Wondercise is a smart technology and fitness equipment brand that aims to improve personal sports performance by providing a complete fitness experience for all.

In just four years, Wonder Core has become a top-300 patent applicant in Taiwan, receiving invitations from the government to participate in national innovation events. Alongside its continued work to develop its Motion Matching technology, research is being carried out in partnership with gyms and hospitals.

For more information, visit: https://www.wondercise.com/EN

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201006005849/en/

Contacts

Eric Chuang
[email protected]

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Johnson plays down technical failure of Covid-19 testing data system

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson leaves 10 Downing Street for PMQs at the House of Commons on 30 September, 2020 in London, England.

Alberto Pezzali | NurPhoto via Getty Images

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Monday sought to play down a failure in England’s Covid-19 testing data system that delayed 15,841 results, saying the much higher updated figures were more in line with forecasts of the outbreak’s spread.

The glitch is likely to cast further doubt over Johnson’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic: his Conservative government’s response has been cast by political opponents as slow, poorly organized and confusing.

On Sunday, authorities reported a jump in daily Covid-19 cases to a record 22,961, after saying a technical issue had meant that thousands of test results had not been transferred into computer systems on time, including for contact tracers.

“The incidence that we’re seeing in the cases really sort of corresponds to pretty much where we thought we were,” Johnson said, speaking to reporters.

“To be frank, I think that the slightly lower numbers that we’d seen didn’t really reflect where we thought that the disease was likely to go, so I think these numbers are realistic,” said Johnson.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock will update parliament on the mishap later on Monday, he said.

Johnson, who earlier this year promised a “world-beating” test-and-trace system, has more recently said there have been missteps but that the government has been confronted with the biggest health crisis since the 1918 influenza outbreak.

The technical glitch, which was identified on Friday and has now been resolved, led to 15,841 cases not being uploaded into reporting dashboards used by the National Health Service (NHS) contact-tracing system.

“We fully understand the concern this may cause and further robust measures have been put in place as a result,” said Michael Brodie, the interim chief executive of Public Health England, the government-funded body in charge of public health management in Britain’s biggest region.

PHE said that all the people concerned had been given their test results in a timely fashion, and that those who had tested positive had been told to self-isolate.

Asked about a vaccine, Johnson said it felt like an AstraZeneca project must be on the verge of one.

“We are working very very hard to get one,” Johnson said of a vaccine. “We are not there yet.”

“I went to see the scientists at Oxford at the Jenner Institute, the AstraZeneca team — incredible what they’re doing. You know you really feel they must be on the verge of it, but its got to be properly tested,” Johnson said.

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Chesapeake Regional Information System for Our Patients (CRISP) Selects Get Real Health for Patient Portal Solution

Maryland Patients Will Have Secure Access to Their Health Data Starting With COVID-19 Test Results

Get Real Health, a member of the CPSI (NASDAQ: CPSI) family of companies and a provider of comprehensive patient engagement tools, announced today that the Chesapeake Regional Information System for our Patients (CRISP), Maryland’s statewide health information exchange, has selected Get Real Health’s patient engagement platform to help improve secure access to COVID-19 test results for patients in Maryland.

The first phase of the project will be rolled out across the state of Maryland and is expected to be available in November 2020. Included in the first phase is the proven Get Real Health patient engagement platform that will enable patients to access their COVID-19 test results quickly and easily in a secure environment. Available in both a web-based portal and native mobile application, individuals will have access to their COVID-19 test results anytime, anywhere for added efficiency and convenience.

This patient engagement solution will seamlessly integrate with the Health Information Exchange (HIE) currently in place as part of the CRISP suite of tools, facilitating the secure exchange of data from disparate providers and organizations throughout the region.

“These are unprecedented times related to protecting public health in our community due to COVID-19, and we are honored to work with the official health exchange for the state of Maryland,” said Robin Wiener, president of Get Real Health. “Helping to ease the stress of COVID-19 testing and playing a role in improving the health and safety of our fellow citizens is personal to us. As a Maryland company, we have benefited from the support of many state and local organizations over the years. Being a part of this project brings our mission full circle.”

“It is critical that patients have their COVID-19 test results as quickly as possible,” said Craig Behm, Maryland executive director of CRISP. “Although most patients will receive information directly from their physicians, those going to walk-up testing sites may need results through CRISP instead. Get Real Health’s focus on access and interoperability make them great partners in this endeavor.”

“The importance of patient involvement and empowerment in managing their care is more important than ever as we manage through this pandemic,” said Boyd Douglas, president and chief executive officer of CPSI. “We look forward to the benefits and impact that the Get Real Health patient engagement platform will have in Maryland and other states for years to come.”

About Get Real Health

Get Real Health, a member of the CPSI family of companies, combines a world of new information from patients, devices and apps with existing clinical data to help individuals and healthcare professionals engage and empower each other. By giving providers and patients the information and tools that they need to work together, we help our customers meet their ever-changing patient engagement needs. Our suite of products helps deliver value-based care, improve outcomes, activate patients, and increase patient loyalty and satisfaction, all while meeting regulatory requirements. For more information,

Israels shutdown and their medical system is collapsing….

…The new lockdown imposes stay-at-home orders on all Israel, allowing citizens to distance themselves from their residences by about half a mile if they need essentials such as food or medicine…

…Israel’s hospital system is overwhelmed and on a fast track to collapse, according to the nation’s top experts responsible for COVID-19 patients.

At an extraordinary press conference, Dr. Avishai Elis, the secretary of the Israel’s Internal Medicine Association, warned the public of an imminent disaster and the “tragic implications” of the paralysis which has taken hold of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government regarding the nation’s hospitals….

…For every coronavirus ward opening up, she noted, a non-coronavirus ward closes. There are not enough doctors to operate both. Patients who would otherwise receive top-notch care were being discharged early and “in the coming months hospitals will be forced to make unimaginable choices,” she said.

The Health Ministry announced on Thursday that due to shortages, it is experimenting with the reuse of PPE for medical staff in hospital COVID wards.

Hospital directors were also incensed by the Health Ministry’s refusal to provide doctors with flu shots from the first batch that arrived in Israel— advising them to wait till November—and by the ministry’s lack of transparency regarding contagion.

Dr. Tamy Shohat, a professor of preventive medicine and epidemiology at Tel Aviv University’s medical school, described her failed efforts, during the first wave to obtain raw data collected by Israeli authorities. “Today,” she said, “the situation is so desperate. We had 9,000 positive cases today. Where did they test? In which neighborhoods? Only among the ultra-Orthodox? Among people exposed to someone with COVID-19? All Israel? It is impossible to understand anything from this.”….

…On Sept. 22, Hebrew University professor Yinon Ashkenazy warned the authorities that Israel would cross the red line of 800 acute COVID-19 patients by the end of the week, meaning all the nation’s hospitals would be at full capacity.

His prediction was borne out. On Thursday, Israel had 812 COVID-19 patients in critical care, with the figures mounting….

….Following the effective handling of the pandemic’s first wave, its resurgence came a short two months after the government shambolically reopened schools, lifted constraints on massive public gatherings, and Netanyahu urged Israelis: “Enjoy yourselves. Have a beer.”…

…..On Thursday, for the first time in Israeli history, the army announced that military medical personnel will treat civilians in two coronavirus wards it will open at Haifa’s Rambam Medical Center.

Rambam, the largest hospital in Israel’s north, is among the best-prepared medical centers. Last week, in anticipation of the oncoming onslaught, it opened its Fortified Underground Emergency Hospital for the first time since it was built, in 2014, originally with the aim of protecting patients from incoming Hezbollah missiles located in nearby Southern Lebanon.

Hidden 54 feet underground, the bomb-proof bunker has 770 beds, including 170 adapted to patients on ventilators, and is now Israel’s largest dedicated coronavirus treatment center….

Brain-Eating Microbe Found In Texas Town’s Water System Following Boy’s Death

KEY POINTS

  • A 6-year-old boy died in early September from an infection caused by a brain-eating amoeba
  • Three of the 11 samples collected confirmed the presence of the naegleria fowleri microbe in Lake Jackson’s water system
  • Officials warned residents to not drink tap water directly and boil their water before use

The presence of a brain-eating parasite that led to the death of a 6-year-old boy was found in the water system of a Texas town near Houston. Officials said it will take at least 60 days to completely disinfect the water system.

Health officials started collecting water samples to conduct tests after the death of Josiah McIntyre in Lake Jackson, Texas, in early September. Three of the 11 samples collected tested positive for the naegleria fowleri microbe, Lake Jackson City Manager Modesto Mundo told Associated Press on Monday.

On Sept. 25, the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality (TCEQ) alerted the Brazosport Water Authority (BWA) about the presence of the microbe in its water system, prompting BWA to issue a warning in eight cities including Lake Jackson, Freeport, Angleton, Brazoria, Richwood, Oyster Creek, Clute, and Rosenberg.

The residents were asked not to use tap water for any reason except to flush toilets. The advisory was later canceled for the other communities, but not for Lake Jackson, a city of more than 27,000, where the authority’s water treatment plant was located. A day later, the warning was lifted for Lake Jackson residents, but they were still urged to boil the water before using it.

Mundo said the city’s water utility is working to replace any “old water” in its system with freshwater, thereby disinfecting and purging the system of the naegleria fowleri parasite. “We’ll be doing that for a 60-day period,” Mundo told the AP.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, naegleria fowleri is a free-living microscopic amoeba commonly found in warm freshwater and soil. It is known to infect people when contaminated water enters the body through nose and travels to the brain, causing a fatal disease called primary amebic meningoencephalitis. The infection typically occurs when people go swimming or diving in lakes and rivers, as well as through contaminated tap water.

Bacteria Bacteria, as seen under a microscope. Photo: PublicDomainPictures/Pixabay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Immune system holds clues to virus reaction

One of COVID-19’s scariest mysteries is why some people are mildly ill or have no symptoms and others rapidly die — and scientists are starting to unravel why.

An international team of researchers found that in some people with severe COVID-19, the body goes rogue and attacks one of its own key immune defenses instead of fighting the coronavirus. Most were men, helping to explain why the virus is hitting men harder than women.

And separate research suggests that children fare better than adults thanks to robust “first responder” immune cells that wane with age.


They’re the latest in a list of studies uncovering multiple features of the immune system’s intricate cascade that can tip the scales between a good or bad outcome. Next up: Figuring out if all these new clues might offer much-needed ways to intervene.

“We have the knowledge and capability of really boosting many aspects of the immune system. But we need to not use the sledge hammer,” cautioned Dr. Betsy Herold of New York’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine, who co-authored the child study.

Adding to the complexity, people’s wildly varying reactions also reflect other factors, such as how healthy they were to begin with and how much of the virus — the “dose” — they were exposed to.

“Infection and what happens after infection is a very dynamic thing,” said Alessandro Sette, a researcher at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology in San Diego, who is studying yet another piece of the immune response.

IMMUNE PRIMER

There are two main arms of the immune system. Innate immunity is the body’s first line of defense. As soon as the body detects a foreign intruder, key molecules, such as interferons and inflammation-causing cytokines, launch a wide-ranging attack.

Innate immune cells also alert the slower-acting “adaptive” arm of the immune system, the germ-specific sharpshooters, to gear up. B cells start producing virus-fighting antibodies, the proteins getting so much attention in the vaccine hunt.

But antibodies aren’t the whole story. Adaptive immunity’s many other ingredients include “killer” T cells that destroy virus-infected cells — and “memory” T and B cells that remember an infection so they spring into action quicker if they encounter that germ again.

A MISSING PIECE

Usually when a virus invades a cell, proteins called Type I interferons spring into action, defending the cell by interfering with viral growth. But new research shows those crucial molecules were essentially absent in a subset of people with severe COVID-19.

An international project uncovered two reasons. In blood from nearly 1,000 severe COVID-19 patients, researchers found 1 in 10 had what are called auto-antibodies — antibodies that mistakenly attack those needed virus fighters. Especially surprising, autoimmune disorders tend to be more common in women — but 95% of these COVID-19 patients were men.

The researchers didn’t find the damaging molecules in patients with mild or asymptomatic COVID-19.

In another 660 severely ill patients, the same team found 3.5% had gene mutations that didn’t produce Type I interferons.

Each

Deadly delays in L.A. County’s public hospital system

A tip from a doctor led Times reporters to investigate specialty appointment waits in Los Angeles County's public hospital system. <span class="copyright">(Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)</span>
A tip from a doctor led Times reporters to investigate specialty appointment waits in Los Angeles County’s public hospital system. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

It started with a phone call in the fall of 2018 from a doctor working for the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services.

Patients by the thousands were suffering unnecessarily because of extremely long waits to see specialists, the doctor said. Some were dying before they could get an appointment.

The tip launched an investigation that spanned nearly two years and focused on the county’s sprawling safety-net healthcare system that serves more than 2 million, primarily the region’s poorest and most vulnerable residents.

We interviewed dozens of current and former county healthcare providers, patients and outside medical experts. We also analyzed L.A. County data from hundreds of thousands of specialist referrals and obtained thousands of pages of medical records.

How we verified long waits

The stories we heard were always the same: Wait times were dangerously long.

But the patients and their families were most often relying on memory. Doctors and nurses can’t talk about cases for fear of retaliation from their bosses and concerns about violating strict medical privacy laws. We needed medical records to verify the accounts.

By law, medical records are private. So requests have to be signed by patients or, if the patient has died, by the person who signed the death certificate. We spent months driving across Southern California knocking on doors and collecting signatures.

More months passed as families waited to receive the records. When the documents finally arrived, county health officials had almost always withheld important parts of the medical files.

Conspicuously absent were records from eConsult, an internal email-like system that primary care doctors and nurses use to discuss cases and arrange face-to-face appointments with specialists. We helped the family members push back and demand everything they were entitled to.

It was only after county officials learned The Times was working with the families that they turned over records from the referral system — with an apology for the delay.

After asking for permission from the families, we shared the documents the county finally produced with medical experts inside and outside the county system. Long waits were obvious in every case.

Half a dozen of the patients died after waiting at least three months to see a doctor in a critical specialty — cardiology, oncology, gastroenterology and nephrology. It wasn’t always clear how much the long waits contributed to the patient’s death, but in every case, the experts said, the patient should have been treated much sooner.

Though the individual stories were heartbreaking, they were also anecdotal. We needed to find out whether they were unusual or represented a common experience for L.A. County patients.

How we calculated overall wait times

We knew that it was possible to measure wait times for routine specialist appointments provided by the Department of Health Services. In 2017, two county health services executives published a study with

Major hospital system struggling to recover computer network operations after cyberattack

Universal Health Services, a large hospital system with more than 400 locations across the country, was still working Tuesday to get its network and operations back online after a cyberattack early Sunday morning.



a close up of a sign: A logo sign outside the headquarters of Universal Health Services, Inc., in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania on June 28, 2015. Photo by Kristoffer Tripplaar *** Please Use Credit from Credit Field ***


© Kristoffer Tripplaar/Sipa/AP
A logo sign outside the headquarters of Universal Health Services, Inc., in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania on June 28, 2015. Photo by Kristoffer Tripplaar *** Please Use Credit from Credit Field ***

“We are making steady progress with recovery efforts,” the Pennsylvania-based company said in a statement late Tuesday. “Certain applications have already started coming online again, with others projected to be restored on a rolling basis across the U.S.”

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The company said it “experienced an information technology security incident in the early morning hours of September 27, 2020,” and as a result it was forced to shut down its entire computer network, impacting patient data, laboratory systems and clinical information.

“Patient care continues to be delivered safely and effectively,” the company’s statement noted, adding that at the moment there’s “no evidence that patient or employee data was accessed, copied or misused.”

Dr. Jonathan Reiner, a cardiologist at George Washington University Medical Center, a UHS acute care hospital impacted by the attack, told CNN it may take several days to reset the system.

“They proactively took down all, their entire network, to protect the network when they detected the attack and they’re working using these downtime protocols to maintain clinical operations in a safe way while they slowly bring systems back up online,” he said.

In the meantime, he said it’s a “big deal.”

Reiner said the affected facilities are back to using manual systems, which was once the norm, so patient safety isn’t necessarily a problem at all. “But it’s a big deal. It’s a big deal,” he repeated.

He said he had to cancel several surgical procedures Tuesday and added it’s “much more cumbersome to track down patient data.”

The UHS statement said its facilities are using “established back-up processes including offline documentation methods” — meaning pen and paper.

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