Trump’s COVID-19 Diagnosis Date Clarified, Conflicting Update Cites ‘Very Concerning’ Vitals

Drew Angerer/Getty President Donald Trump departs the White House for New Jersey on Thursday

Shortly after Donald Trump’s physician announced that the president is “doing very well,” an anonymous White House source released a health update that greatly contradicts the doctor’s report.

Following Dr. Sean Conley’s address on Saturday morning outside of Walter Reed hospital, where Trump is scheduled to remain under observation for several days, a White House official said in a pool report that Trump’s vitals are “very concerning.”

“The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery,” the statement read.

The update from the anonymous source raises questions about Trump’s health as Conley shared vastly different information about the president, reporting that he was “doing great.”

RELATED: At Least 8 Test Positive for COVID-19 After Attending Trump’s White House SCOTUS Ceremony

“As reported yesterday, in consultation with this group I recommended we bring the president up to Walter Reed as a precautionary measure to provide state of the art monitoring and any care he might need,” Conley said during the Saturday morning press conference. “At this time the team and I are extremely happy with the progress the president has made.”

“The president’s been fever free for over 24 hours. We remain cautiously optimistic, but he’s doing great,” he added later, noting that his other symptoms, which included fatigue, “are now resolving and improving.”

During the press conference, Conley said they were “72 hours into the diagnosis.”

However, Conley later clarified in a press release that he misspoke about Trump’s diagnosis timeline.

“I incorrectly used the term ‘seventy two hours’ instead of ‘day three’ and ‘forty eight hours’ instead of ‘day two’ with regards to [Trump’s] diagnosis and the administration of the polyclonal antibody therapy,” he said in a statement.

Conley added, “The President was first diagnosed with COVID-19 on the evening of Thursday, October 1st and had received Regeron’s [sic] antibody cocktail on Friday, October 2nd.”

Another one of his physicians added during the conference that the president was not currently on oxygen or “having difficulty breathing” and was able to walk around. Dr. Sean Dooley also added that the president made a comment that day saying, “I feel like I could walk out of here today,” which the physician described as a “very encouraging” comment.

Trump’s doctors also said they plan to continue carrying out a five-day treatment plan of Remdesivir.

The president, 74, publicly revealed his coronavirus diagnosis in a tweet on early Friday morning.

And on Saturday afternoon, Trump praised the “Doctors, Nurses and

UN chief cites pandemic’s ‘unprecedent toll’

UNITED NATIONS — The United Nations chief says the COVID-19 pandemic has taken “an unprecedent toll” especially on the economies of many developing countries and the world has not responded with “the massive and urgent support those countries and communities need.”

Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said that in the United States, Canada, Europe and most of the developed world, governments have adopted packages valued in double-digits of GDP to help tackle the coronavirus crisis and its impact.

“The problem is to mobilize the resources to allow the developing countries to be able to do the same,” he told a joint press conference Tuesday with Jamaican Prime Minister Andrew Holness and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who have been jointly spearheading high-level meetings to try to raise the resources.

Guterres urged the international community to increase resources to the International Monetary Fund, including through a new allocation of special drawing rights and a voluntary reallocation of existing special drawing rights. He said many countries urgently need debt relief and called for the current debt suspensions to be extended and expanded to all developing and middle-income countries that need help. The private sector, including credit-rating agencies, also “must be engaged in relief efforts,” he said.

The U.N. chief said he is encouraged to see over 40 world leaders and the heads of the IMF, World Bank, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the African Union “coming together around these bold policies.”

He urged the international community to provide $35 billion — including $15 billion immediately — to fund “the ACT-Accelerator to ensure equitable access to diagnostics, treatments and vaccines” for all countries.

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK

— New York City officials to start issuing fines to people who refuse to wear masks in areas with spikes in the novel coronavirus

— llinois Gov. Pritzker to quarantine 2 weeks after contact with staffer who tested positive

— India vice president tests positive for virus, isolating at home

— How can I volunteer for a COVID-19 vaccine study?

— The coronavirus is infecting a rising number of American children and teens in a trend authorities say appears driven by school re-openings, resumption of sports and play dates.

— University of Notre Dame president Rev. John I. Jenkins apologized for not wearing a mask after pictures surfaced online of him shaking hands and sitting shoulder-to-shoulder with people at a recent Rose Garden ceremony.

— Tennessee Titans players, staff test positive for coronavirus; first outbreak in the NFL at Week 4.

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Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

RALEIGH, N.C. — The University of North Carolina system reported its first coronavirus-related student death on Tuesday since several campuses reopened with at least partial in-person learning last month.

Chad Dorrill, a 19-year student at Appalachian State University who lived off campus in Boone and took all of his classes online, died on Monday due to coronavirus complications, officials said.

“Any