Scrubs brand FIGS comes under fire for ‘insensitive’ ad featuring female physician

FIGS, a medical apparel company known for its fashionable scrubs, has come under fire for an “insensitive” video that portrayed female doctors of osteopathic medicine as “dummies.”



a person holding a sign: A medical worker walks past a sign that reads "Express Care."


© Spencer Platt/Getty Images, File
A medical worker walks past a sign that reads “Express Care.”

In the marketing materials, a woman wearing a set of pink scrubs and a name tag with the abbreviation DO, for doctor of osteopathic medicine, is holding a “Medical Terminology for Dummies” book upside down. Many in the medical community criticized the since-removed ad as misogynistic and disrespectful toward female physicians and DOs.

“We are outraged that in 2020, women physicians and doctors of osteopathic medicine are still attacked in thoughtless and ignorant marketing campaigns,” the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine said in a statement. “A company like FIGS that asks us to spend money on its product should be ashamed for promoting these stereotypes. We demand the respect we’ve earned AND a public apology.”

The organization Physicians for Patient Protection said it was “dismayed” by the Los Angeles-based company’s marketing.

“Our DO colleagues are highly trained physicians, many of whom hold leadership positions in academia and have authored medical texts themselves,” the organization said in a statement to ABC News. “Many of our DO colleagues are also women. And they may wear pink scrubs, but they’ve never needed to read any textbook made ‘for dummies.'”

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FIGS apologized for the video on Tuesday, saying it had “dropped the ball.”

“A lot of you guys have pointed out an insensitive video we had on our site — we are incredibly sorry for any hurt this has caused you, especially our female DOs (who are amazing!),” the company tweeted Tuesday. “FIGS is a female-founded company whose only mission is to make you guys feel awesome.”

Dr. Stephanie Markle, DO, MPH, an ICU doctor and surgeon in Kalamazoo, Michigan, told ABC News that the “blatantly misogynistic” ad has angered many in the medical community. Markle said the ad is particularly harmful as someone who experiences sexism and has to “constantly validate” herself as a female physician.

“I have to explain to people multiple times: I’m not the nurse, I’m not the dietitian, I’m not the janitor,” she said.

Female doctors also tend to make less than men, she noted. Male primary care physicians make about 25% more than their female counterparts, according to Medscape. Among specialists, they make 31% more, it found.

“The sexism is still so prevalent that this was such a slap to the face,” Markle said.

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DOs are fully licensed physicians who take a more holistic approach to medicine, compared to medical doctors. Dr. Miranda Rosenberg, MD, a resident in the ABC News Medical Unit, said the ad was particularly insensitive “especially after so many doctors have sacrificed so much

MYXfitness Is The First At-Home Fitness Brand to Integrate National News, Plus a Full Suite of Revolutionary Content On Its Platform

MYX’s member research shows content variety outside of structured workouts is becoming an important factor in what people crave as they tackle fitness at home. While on-demand, one-on-one coaching is essential, catching up on the news, virtually exploring an exotic locale or discovering motivational content, might be what the day calls for. MYX Media provides members those options and more, while still integrating heart-rate data as a powerful measure and motivator.

“Adding MYX Media to our one-on-one coaching and customized heart-rate training, further positions MYX as the most personalized experience in at-home fitness,” says Heberto Calves, President of MYXfitness. “The fitness-tech industry at large seems disproportionately focused on the competitive, ‘workout to win’ consumer. The MYX content and experience speak to the 58% of the market that identifies as ‘workout for life’. These consumers are looking for real results for real life and have asked for options, beyond coaching content, to stay motivated and engaged. MYX Media provides those options and redefines what people should expect from the at-home fitness experience.”

At launch, MYX Media will include:

  • News Streaming: Straightforward, opinion-free, 24/7 news from MYX’s partner Newsy. This partnership allows members to conveniently stream the news to stay informed on important headlines, while squeezing in a workout from the comfort of their own home. For Newsy’s full programming lineup, visit newsy.com/tv-schedule/.
  • Mat Chats: Original interview series with industry and subject-matter experts hosted by MYX Coaches. The series explores fitness, health and wellness topics that the MYX community will learn about together. It empowers members with information, tools and options on a number of subjects ranging from debunking nutrition myths and healthy relationships to sticking to your fitness goals and sleep.
  • Coach Diaries: Intimate interviews with MYX Coaches who share personal stories about their real lives to strengthen the bond between coaches and members. In each episode, a MYX Coach reveals how fitness and movement helped them get through personal obstacles like body image, sobriety, divorce, anxiety and more.
  • Scenic Rides: A series of exotic, scenic rides for virtual travels to far away locales such as New Zealand, Northern Italy, Hawaii and more. The timed rides offer an immersive, self-paced alternative to coach-led workouts with amazing views as you pedal across the Pacific Northwest, Costa Rica or the Chilean Patagonia.

MYX Media features (Newsy, Mat Chats, Coach Diaries, Scenic Rides) go live October 27, 2020. For interviews, access to content or demos please contact [email protected].  

About MYXfitness

MYXfitness delivers a smarter simpler way for all people to make fitness part of their daily lives. The brand’s cornerstone products, The MYX and The MYX Plus, offer professional-quality equipment at an affordable price, hundreds of on-demand classes, combined with expert coaching on a digital platform, designed to improve endurance, strength, mobility and flexibility. Using science-backed methods, MYXfitness utilizes proprietary heart rate technology and cross-training, brought to life through positive

Jasmine Food Named Their 16th Consecutive “Malaysia’s Reader’s Digest Most Trusted Brand Award”

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Oct. 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Amidst the current unprecedented time of economic downturn due to the Covid-19 outbreak, Jasmine Food Corporation (Jasmine) Sdn Bhd has demonstrated its sustainable performance as evidenced by 10th consecutive years of receiving awards by Reader’s Digest. The 2020 accolade saw Jasmine awarded with “Platinum Trusted Brand” in the Rice category among other Rice Brand in Malaysia. 

Jasmine Food supports Pusat Darah Negara’s (PDN) Blood Donation Drive
Jasmine Food supports Pusat Darah Negara’s (PDN) Blood Donation Drive

“We have established our presence for more than 5 decades as one of the leading rice market producers and distributors in Malaysia. We are proud of the awards that we have received for so many years. The awards, for us, is encouragement to enhance our trusted brand to keep providing the highest quality of our healthy rice variants,” Lim Swee Keat, CEO of Jasmine Food Corporation, explained.

Lim also concerns about healthy eating lifestyle. For that reason, Jasmine provides rice produced through the right cultivation that can grow healthy products. “Among our products range in the list are fragrant, basmathi, calrose, health rice, glutinous rice, rice vermicelli, and we also have imported white rice.”

Innovation is one crucial element that also attributes to the success of Jasmine, which is evidenced by the production of innovative products such as long grain basmathi rice. This type of low-fat and low carbohydrate rice contains a low level of glycemic index, protein, calcium and vitamins. Hence, Jasmine has won the trust and support achieved by partnering with the country’s health institute, Tung Shin Hospital, National Blood Donation Centre (PDN), National Diabetic Association, and National Heart Institute or Institute Jantung Negara (IJN).

“We became a subsidiary Padiberas Nasional Bhd (Bernas) in 1996 and have ever since imported a wide variety of rice from Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, India, Pakistan, Australia, and USA to cater to diverse needs of customers from various countries,” Lim added.

Reader’s Digest has for 22 consecutive years held such a prestigious accolade to gain insights into customers’ views and trusted brands, based on trustworthiness and credibility, quality, value, understanding of customer needs, innovation, and social responsibility. The insights were collected from around 8,000 individuals from five countries/regions, including Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the Philippines.  Platinum Trusted Brand Awards were given to brands that topped their category with an overwhelmingly higher score than their nearest competitor.

The trustworthiness, quality and credibility are also proven through Jasmine Rice’s money-back guarantee policy. Choose Jasmine products today, because you can trust in its quality and consistency.

For more information, visit: http://www.jasmine.com.my/ or https://www.facebook.com/jasminefoodcorporation

Photo – https://photos.prnasia.com/prnh/20201009/2927709-1

SOURCE Jasmine Food

Source Article

Trump’s Doctor Comes From a Uniquely American Brand of Medicine



(Johann Rousselot / laif / Redux)


© Provided by The Atlantic
(Johann Rousselot / laif / Redux)

After three of Andrew Taylor Still’s children died of spinal meningitis in 1864, the midwestern healer turned against mainstream medicine. Eschewing drugs and surgery, Still gravitated toward the wellness offerings of his era, dabbling in magnetic healing and hydrotherapy, before outlining a philosophy of his own. Drawing from the teachings of his Methodist-preacher father and his own experiences farming on the frontier, Still argued that the body was a self-healing machine. When physical, psychological, and spiritual afflictions interfered, a doctor’s job was to gently return a patient to homeostasis, usually through hands-on manipulation of the spine. Still called this new discipline osteopathy.

While allopathic, or medical, doctors can trace their lineage back to Hippocrates and ancient Greece, osteopathy is a uniquely American tradition, comparable to jazz, says Wolfgang Gilliar, the dean of osteopathic medicine at Touro University, in Nevada. One in five Americans has never heard of osteopathic doctors, according to the American Osteopathic Association, but they are a substantive presence in health care. They quietly account for more than 8.5 percent of all physicians in the United States and as of 2017, 26 percent of first-year medical students. While M.D.s may specialize in ever more complicated fields, many D.O.s are proud generalists, and they’re more likely to serve patients’ most basic health needs as primary-care doctors. They are especially prevalent in rural settings, but one is also in the White House: In 2018, President Donald Trump selected the osteopathic doctor Sean Conley as his physician.



a close up of a persons hand


© Johann Rousselot / laif / Redux


[Read: The president is not well]

Today, osteopathic manipulative medicine consists of dozens of manual techniques—many of them also employed by masseuses, chiropractors, and physical therapists. There’s high velocity, low amplitude, or HVLA, a pretzel of trust in which a doctor wraps their arm around a curled-up patient to deliver a quick, popping thrust. Strain/counterstrain, which involves holding a patient’s aching joint in a pain-free position, is so gentle that it can feel like nothing at all. D.O.s also do soft-tissue work, including kneading and stretching; lymphatic techniques, such as pumping a patient like a Shake Weight at 100 beats per second to encourage drainage; and myofascial release, a subtle but sustained pressure on irritated trigger points.

Many patients of osteopathic doctors, myself included, are exceedingly loyal. D.O.s believe that their holistic approach distinguishes their practice from that of allopathic doctors, and although they spend about the same amount of time with patients as other primary-care doctors, they are more likely than allopathic doctors to ask about a patient’s family life in relation to health. For those who respond to it, manipulative treatment can also provide a drug-free form of pain relief—something that the opioid crisis has shown patients desperately need, yet few doctors feel equipped to address. Whether they know the term or not, many Americans want what the osteopathic philosophy promises: a doctor who trusts their self-knowledge and sees them as a person,